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What fresh lunacy is this? : the authorised biography of Oliver Reed /
Robert Sellers.
imprint
London : Constable & Robinson, 2013.
description
xi, 500 p., 16 unnumbered p.s of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 25 cm.
ISBN
147210112X (hbk), 9781472101129 (hbk)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
London : Constable & Robinson, 2013.
isbn
147210112X (hbk)
9781472101129 (hbk)
catalogue key
9026098
 
Includes bibligraphical references (p. 493-494) and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
'I'm simply the result of the chemicals that were in my mother's ovaries and my father's balls. I'm a loose cannon. That's what I am, and I can't help it.'Oliver Reed: Hellraiser or national treasure? Victim of his own image or cultural icon?Oliver Reed is remembered by many as volatile, hard living talent who was lost too soon. A man whose off-screen antics often overshadowed those on-screen. The persona he created was so charismatic that often he felt obliged to act it out in the public arena, perpetuating the hellraiser myth.Yet the actor remains a national treasure - loved despite his flaws like George Best and Eric Morecambe, who transcended their chosen medium, even became too big for it, and grew into cultural icons.For the first time Oliver Reed's close family has collaborated on a project about Reed himself, revealing a complex man behind the facade, a person of great passions and loyalties underscored by deep-rooted vulnerabilities and insecurities. With never-heard-before anecdotes and new interviews with Reed's family, friends and peers, What Fresh Lunacy is This? is a revealing examination of his mould-breaking personality.
Summaries
Back Cover Copy
Praise for Robert SellersHellraisers: The Life and Inebriated Times of Richard Burton, Richard Harris, Peter O'Toole and Oliver Reed'So wonderfully captures the wanton belligerence of both bingeing and stardom you almost feel the guys themselves are telling the tales.' GQDon't Let the Bastards Grind You Down'A rollicking good read ... a vivid snapshot of this exciting time.' Lynn Barber, Sunday TimesHollywood Hellraisers'Compared to the slavering slop served up in today's celeb rags, this is industrial-strength juice.' Empire
Bowker Data Service Summary
Oliver Reed may not have been Britain's biggest film star - for a period in the early 70s he came within a hairsbreadth of replacing Sean Connery as James Bond - but he is an august member of that small band of people, like George Best and Eric Morecambe, who transcended their chosen medium, became too big for it even, and grew into cultural icons. For the first time Reed's close family has agreed to collaborate on a project about the man himself. The result is a fascinating new insight into a man seen by many as merely a brawling, boozing hellraiser. And yet he was so much more than this.
Bowker Data Service Summary
sOliver Reed may not have been Britain's biggest film star - for a period in the early 70s he came within a hairsbreadth of replacing Sean Connery as James Bond - but he is an august member of that small band of people, like George Best and Eric Morecambe, who transcended their chosen medium, became too big for it even, and grew into cultural icons. For the first time Reed's close family has agreed to collaborate on a project about the man himself. The result is a fascinating new insight into a man seen by many as merely a brawling, boozing hellraiser. And yet he was so much more than this. For behind that image, which all too often he played up to in public, was a vastly complex individual, a man of deep passions and loyalty but also deep-rooted vulnerability and insecurities.
Main Description
Oliver Reed may not have been Britain's biggest film star - for a period in the early 70s he came within a hairsbreadth of replacing Sean Connery as James Bond - but he is an august member of that small band of people, like George Best and Eric Morecambe, who transcended their chosen medium, became too big for it even, and grew into cultural icons.For the first time Reed's close family has agreed to collaborate on a project about the man himself. The result is a fascinating new insight into a man seen by many as merely a brawling, boozing hellraiser. And yet he was so much more than this. For behind that image, which all too often he played up to in public, was a vastly complex individual, a man of deep passions and loyalty but also deep-rooted vulnerability and insecurities. Why was a proud, patriotic, intelligent, successful and erudite man so obsessed about proving himself to others, time and time again?Although the Reed myth is of Homeric proportions, he remains a national treasure and somewhat peculiar icon.Praise for other books by Robert Sellers: Hellraisers: The Life and Inebriated Times of Richard Burton, Richard Harris, Peter O'Toole, and Oliver Reed: 'So wonderfully captures the wanton belligerence of both binging and stardom you almost feel the guys themselves are telling the tales.' GQ. Vic Armstrong: The True Adventures of the World's Greatest Stuntman:'This is the best and most original behind-the-scenes book I have read in years, gripping and revealing.' Roger Lewis, Daily Mail. Don't Let the Bastards Grind You Down: '...a rollicking good read... Sellers has done well to capture a vivid snapshot of this exciting time.' Lynn Barber, Sunday Times.

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