Catalogue

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Evaluating culture : well-being, institutions and circumstance /
Matthew Thomas Johnson.
imprint
Houndsmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire : Palgrave Macmillan, 2013.
description
xi, 204 p. ; 23 cm
ISBN
0230296564 (hardback), 9780230296565 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Houndsmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire : Palgrave Macmillan, 2013.
isbn
0230296564 (hardback)
9780230296565 (hardback)
contents note
Machine generated contents note: -- List of Illustrations -- Note on the Author -- Acknowledgements -- Introduction -- 1. The Case Against Cultural Evaluation: Relativism, Culturalism and Romanticism -- 2. Needs, Goods and Self-actualization -- 3. Capabilities, Zero-sum Choices and Equality -- 4. What is Culture? What does it do? What should it do? -- 5. Circumstance, Materialism and Possibilism -- 6. Applying the Theory: Sources of Harm in Aboriginal Australian Communities -- Conclusion -- Endnotes -- Bibliography -- Index.
abstract
"From which evaluative foundation should we develop public policies designed to promote wellbeing among different cultural groups in different circumstances? This book seeks to advance an objective, universal theory of cultural evaluation grounded in a eudaemonic account of human wellbeing. The approach brings together a 'thick vague' conception of the good; a determinate, particularist conception of circumstance; an egalitarian moral philosophy with concessions to sufficientarianism, and a normative functionalist view of culture, to assess the value of cultural institutions to those that they affect. Engaging closely with needs and capabilities paradigms, the approach seeks to identify and explain cultural deficits in given circumstances. The applicability of the theory is illustrated through analysis of the effect of settler-indigenous relations on Aboriginal Australian people. This book is ideal for students and scholars of cultural theory and public policy"--
catalogue key
9025801
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 181-200) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Matthew Thomas Johnson is a British Academy postdoctoral fellow at the University of York, UK, working in political philosophy on issues of cultural diversity and human well-being, specifically with regard to physically invasive practices. He has written on such topics as contemporary Marxism, circumcision, and the thought of John Gray, and has previously taught at Newcastle University, the University of Queensland and the University of Iceland.
Reviews
Review Quotes
Johnson's book is a challenging and highly controversial defence of cultural evaluation. Its philosophical range is exceptionally wide, while its political engagement is informed and sophisticated. Focusing on the case of Aboriginal Australians, Johnson shows both the need for cultural evaluation and the dangers of intervention. This is a book which will be read with profit by anyone working on the politics of cultural diversity. Sue Mendus, Department of Politics, University of York, UK
Johnson's book is a challenging and highly controversial defence of cultural evaluation. Its philosophical range is exceptionally wide, while its political engagement is informed and sophisticated. Focusing on the case of Aboriginal Australians, Johnson shows both the need for cultural evaluation and the dangers of intervention. This is a book which will be read with profit by anyone working on the politics of cultural diversity. Sue Mendus, Department of Politics, University of York, UK This book is remarkable in its ambition. By suggesting an objective basis on which cultures might be evaluated, it seeks to advocate interventions that prevent serious damage to human well-being. This provocative and insightful argument will stimulate significant debate as we grapple with a rapidly globalising world in which different cultures become increasingly intertwined. Shane O'Neill, School of Politics, International Studies and Philosophy, Queen's University Belfast, UK
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
From which evaluative base should we develop policies designed to promote wellbeing among different cultural groups in varying circumstances? This book engages with needs and capabilities to advance normative functionalist assessment of the success with which cultural institutions promote eudaemonic wellbeing in given, determinate circumstances.
Long Description
From which evaluative foundation should we develop public policies designed to promote wellbeing among different cultural groups in different circumstances? This book seeks to advance an objective, universal theory of cultural evaluation grounded in a eudaemonic account of human wellbeing. The approach brings together a 'thick vague' conception of the good; a determinate, particularist conception of circumstance; an egalitarian moral philosophy with concessions to sufficientarianism, and a normative functionalist view of culture, to assess the value of cultural institutions to those that they affect. Engaging closely with needs and capabilities paradigms, the approach seeks to identify and explain cultural deficits in given circumstances. The applicability of the theory is illustrated through analysis of the effect of settler-indigenous relations on Aboriginal Australian people. This book is ideal for students and scholars of cultural theory and public policy.
Main Description
From which evaluative foundation should we develop public policies designed to promote wellbeing among different cultural groups in different circumstances? This book seeks to advance an objective, universal theory of cultural evaluation grounded in a eudaemonic account of human wellbeing. The approach brings together a 'thick vague' conception of the good; a determinate, particularist conception of circumstance; an egalitarian moral philosophy with concessions to sufficientarianism, and anormative functionalist view of culture, to assess the value of cultural institutions to those that they affect. Engaging closely with needs and capabilities paradigms, the approach seeks to identify and explain cultural deficits in given circumstances. The applicability of the theory is illustrated through analysis of the effect of settler-indigenous relations on Aboriginal Australian people. This book is ideal for students and scholars of cultural theory and public policy.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgementsp. viii
About the Authorp. xi
Introductionp. 1
The Case Against Cultural Evaluation: Relativism, Culturalism and Romanticismp. 13
Needs, Goods and Self-Actualizationp. 42
Capabilities, Zero-Sum Choices, Equality and Scopep. 72
What Is Culture? What Does It Do? What Should It Do?p. 97
Circumstance, Materialism and Possibilismp. 120
Applying the Theory: Sources of Harm in Aboriginal Australian Communitiesp. 142
Conclusionp. 168
Notesp. 174
Bibliographyp. 181
Indexp. 201
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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