Catalogue


The collaboration : Hollywood's pact with Hitler /
Ben Urwand.
imprint
Cambridge, Massachusetts : The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2013.
description
327 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0674724747 (Cloth), 9780674724747 (Cloth)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge, Massachusetts : The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2013.
Cambridge, Massachusetts ; London, England : The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2013.
isbn
0674724747 (Cloth)
9780674724747 (Cloth)
contents note
Hitler's obsession with film -- Enter Hollywood -- "Good" -- "Bad" -- "Switched off" -- Switched on -- Epilogue.
catalogue key
9016223
 
Includes bibliographical references (pages [255]-315) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 2013-07-22:
Urwand keeps the jaw-dropping revelations coming in this damning indictment of the complicity of the major Hollywood studios-and their mostly Jewish heads-in the Nazis' campaign to exterminate Europe's Jews. Initially, profit was the main motivation behind the decisions to give the famously media-savvy German government veto power over scenes and lines it deemed inappropriate, incendiary, or-in the words of a law passed in Germany in 1932 that threatened to completely bar companies that distributed anti-German movies anywhere from further trade in the Fatherland-"detrimental to German prestige." (The first film to suffer the self-serving edits of the Nazi censors was 1930's All Quiet on the Western Front.) Even as news of the Third Reich's extreme anti-Semitism reached the States, Hollywood studios continued with business as usual. That money-driven momentum soon translated into active efforts to thwart the production of an anti-Hitler film, The Mad Dog of Europe (written by Herman Mankiewicz, the man who would go on to write Citizen Kane), which had the potential to get information about the German dictator out to a broad audience. Urwand deserves immense credit for this groundbreaking-and truly unique-take on the WWII era. 25 photos. (Oct.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
Reviews
Review Quotes
A tremendous piece of work, fully sustained, building momentum charged by thrillingly detailed storytelling, increasing suspense, and a consistent movement from outrages to atrocities, with a stunning conclusion of heroism and tragedy--and it is as well a devastating RIP to what we've been told, all down these years, about 'the genius of the system.'
Full of startling and surprising revelations, presented in exemplary fashion, without any moralizing or sensationalism. The Collaboration shows how Hollywood and especially the big studios went along with German demands to censor movies not only before but especially after the Nazi seizure of power.
Offers a keen, unsettling look at the unholy alliance Hollywood made with the Nazis, which allowed both to keep packing movie theaters in Germany up until the outbreak of war...There was pressure on the studios to censor defense of Jews in certain films and suppress films that portrayed Nazis in an unflattering light ( The Mad Dog of Europe ). The result of this complicated and slippery relationship, as Urwand depicts with subtlety, was the absolute disappearance from film of Nazis and Jews until the end of the decade.
Urwand draws on a wealth of previously uncited documents to argue that Hollywood studios, in an effort to protect the German market for their movies, not only acquiesced to Nazi censorship but also actively and enthusiastically cooperated with that regime's global propaganda effort.
Urwand keeps the jaw-dropping revelations coming in this damning indictment of the complicity of the major Hollywood studios--and their mostly Jewish heads--in the Nazis' campaign to exterminate Europe's Jews...Urwand deserves immense credit for this groundbreaking--and truly unique--take on the WWII era.
Urwand ...presents explosive new evidence about the shocking extent of the partnership between the Nazis and major Hollywood producers...[A] riveting book...As you turn its pages you realize with dismay that collaboration is the only fitting word for the relationship between Hitler and Hollywood in the 1930s. Using new archival discoveries, Urwand alleges that some of the Hollywood studio heads, nearly all of whom were Jewish, cast their lot with Hitler almost from the moment he took power, and that they did so eagerly--not reluctantly. What they wanted was access to German audiences. What Hitler wanted was the ability to shape the content of Hollywood movies--and he got it...What is shocking and new about Urwand's account is its blow-by-blow description of Hollywood executives tailoring their product to meet the demands of the Nazi regime.
This item was reviewed in:
Publishers Weekly, July 2013
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
To continue doing business in Germany after Hitler's ascent to power, Hollywood studios agreed not to make films that attacked the nazis or condemned Germany's persecution of Jews. Ben Urwand reveals this bargain - a 'collaboration' that drew in a cast of characters ranging from notorious German political leaders such as Goebbels to Hollywood icons such as Louis B. Mayer.
Main Description
To continue doing business in Germany after Hitlers ascent to power, Hollywood studios agreed not to make films that attacked the Nazis or condemned Germanys persecution of Jews. Ben Urwand reveals this bargain for the first time--a "collaboration" "(Zusammenarbeit)" that drew in a cast of characters ranging from notorious German political leaders such as Goebbels to Hollywood icons such as Louis B. Mayer. At the center of Urwands story is Hitler himself, who was obsessed with movies and recognized their power to shape public opinion. In December 1930, his Party rioted against the Berlin screening of "All Quiet on the Western Front," which led to a chain of unfortunate events and decisions. Fearful of losing access to the German market, all of the Hollywood studios started making concessions to the German government, and when Hitler came to power in January 1933, the studios--many of which were headed by Jews--began dealing with his representatives directly. Urwand shows that the arrangement remained in place through the 1930s, as Hollywood studios met regularly with the German consul in Los Angeles and changed or canceled movies according to his wishes. Paramount and Fox invested profits made from the German market in German newsreels, while MGM financed the production of German armaments. Painstakingly marshaling previously unexamined archival evidence, "The Collaboration" raises the curtain on a hidden episode in Hollywood--and American--history.
Main Description
To continue doing business in Germany after Hitler's ascent to power, Hollywood studios agreed not to make films that attacked the Nazis or condemned Germany's persecution of Jews. Ben Urwand reveals this bargain for the first time--a "collaboration" (Zusammenarbeit) that drew in a cast of characters ranging from notorious German political leaders such as Goebbels to Hollywood icons such as Louis B. Mayer. At the center of Urwand's story is Hitler himself, who was obsessed with movies and recognized their power to shape public opinion. In December 1930, his Party rioted against the Berlin screening of All Quiet on the Western Front , which led to a chain of unfortunate events and decisions. Fearful of losing access to the German market, all of the Hollywood studios started making concessions to the German government, and when Hitler came to power in January 1933, the studios--many of which were headed by Jews--began dealing with his representatives directly. Urwand shows that the arrangement remained in place through the 1930s, as Hollywood studios met regularly with the German consul in Los Angeles and changed or canceled movies according to his wishes. Paramount and Fox invested profits made from the German market in German newsreels, while MGM financed the production of German armaments. Painstakingly marshaling previously unexamined archival evidence, The Collaboration raises the curtain on a hidden episode in Hollywood--and American--history.
Table of Contents
Hitler's Obsession with Film
Enter Hollywood
Good
Bad
Switched Off
Switched On
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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