Catalogue


Social change and the family in Taiwan /
Arland Thornton and Hui-Sheng Lin ; with contributions by Jui-Shan Chang ... [et al.].
imprint
Chicago : University of Chicago Press, c1994.
description
ix, 456 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0226798585 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Chicago : University of Chicago Press, c1994.
isbn
0226798585 (cloth : alk. paper)
general note
Spine title: Social change & the family in Taiwan.
catalogue key
900496
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 425-442) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1995-09:
In this interdisciplinary study Thornton's model of modernization and societal change is applied to Taiwan. Data sources are a series of island-wide surveys conducted since 1965 on ever-married women, on education, work experience, and living arrangements, plus supplementary ethnographic materials. The authors were responsible for carrying out the surveys, and the volume reflects the maturity of their scholarship. The model combines in a sophisticated fashion elements of modernization theory, without acknowledging challenges to that theory. In their summary the authors state that their findings "suggest that the forces of change in Taiwan--urbanization, industrialization, and the expansion of nonfamilial institutions and ideologies--affect the environment within which people organize their activities, alter the range of options available to individuals, and change the structure of authority in Chinese families." For instance, the model proposes decreasing parental control as youth gain resources of their own. In turn, spatial contiguity affects the ability of youth to gain these resources. In this study the spatial variable often takes precedence over class variables. Yet both should be used. It would also be useful if the economic circumstances of the enterprises were distinguished. A must read for students of the newly industrialized nations. Graduate, faculty. J. W. Salaff; University of Toronto
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, September 1995
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Summaries
Main Description
Until the 1940s, social life in Taiwan was generally organized through the familymarriages were arranged by parents, for example, and senior males held authority. In the following years, as Taiwan evolved rapidly from an agrarian to an industrialized society, individual decisions became less dependent on the family and more influenced by outside forces. Social Change and the Family in Taiwan provides an in-depth analysis of the complex changes in family relations in a society undergoing revolutionary social and economic transformation. This interdisciplinary study explores the patterns and causes of change in education, work, income, leisure time, marriage, living arrangements, and interactions among extended kin. Theoretical chapters enunciate a theory of family and social change centered on the life course and modes of social organization. Other chapters look at the shift from arranged marriages toward love matches, as well as changes in dating practices, premarital sex, fertility, and divorce. Contributions to the book are made by Jui-Shan Chang, Ming-Cheng Chang, Deborah S. Freedman, Ronald Freedman, Thomas E. Fricke, Albert Hermalin, Mei-Lin Lee, Paul K. C. Liu, Hui-Sheng Lin, Te-Hsiung Sun, Arland Thornton, Maxine Weinstein, and Li-Shou Yang.
Main Description
Until the 1940s, social life in Taiwan was generally organized through the familymarriages were arranged by parents, for example, and senior males held authority. In the following years, as Taiwan evolved rapidly from an agrarian to an industrialized society, individual decisions became less dependent on the family and more influenced by outside forces.Social Change and the Family in Taiwanprovides an in-depth analysis of the complex changes in family relations in a society undergoing revolutionary social and economic transformation.This interdisciplinary study explores the patterns and causes of change in education, work, income, leisure time, marriage, living arrangements, and interactions among extended kin. Theoretical chapters enunciate a theory of family and social change centered on the life course and modes of social organization. Other chapters look at the shift from arranged marriages toward love matches, as well as changes in dating practices, premarital sex, fertility, and divorce.Contributions to the book are made by Jui-Shan Chang, Ming-Cheng Chang, Deborah S. Freedman, Ronald Freedman, Thomas E. Fricke, Albert Hermalin, Mei-Lin Lee, Paul K. C. Liu, Hui-Sheng Lin, Te-Hsiung Sun, Arland Thornton, Maxine Weinstein, and Li-Shou Yang.
Table of Contents
Preface
Introduction
Historical and Ethnographical Perspectives on the Chinese Family
The Social and Economic Transformation of Taiwan
Theoretical Mechanisms of Family Change
The Changing Organization of Individual Activities
From Arranged Marriage toward Love Match
Determinants of Historical Changes in Marital Arrangements, Dating, and Premarital Sexual Intimacy and Pregnancy
Trends in the Timing and Prevalence of Marriage
Determinants of Historical Changes in Marital Timing
Trends in Marital Dissolution
The Fertility Transition in Taiwan
Co-Residence and Other Ties Linking Couples and Their Parents
Determinants of Co-Residence in Extended Households
Weakening the Linkage between the Ancestors, the Living, and Future Generations
Continuity and Change
Sources of Data
Truncation Bias
References
List of Contributors
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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