Catalogue


Black slaves, Indian masters : slavery, emancipation, and citizenship in the Native American south /
Barbara Krauthamer.
imprint
Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, [2013], c2013
description
xiii, 211 p. : ill., maps ; 25 cm
ISBN
1469607107 (cloth : alk. paper), 9781469607108 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, [2013], c2013
isbn
1469607107 (cloth : alk. paper)
9781469607108 (cloth : alk. paper)
contents note
Black slaves, Indian masters: race, gender, and power in the deep south -- Enslaved people, missionaries, and slaveholders: christianity, colonialism, and struggles over slavery -- Slave resistance, sectional crisis, and political factionalism in antebellum Indian territory -- The Treaty of 1866: emancipation and the conflicts over Black people's citizenship rights and Indian nations' sovereignty -- Freedmen's political organizing and the ongoing struggles over citizenship, sovereignty, and squatters -- A new home in the west: allotment, race, and citizenship.
catalogue key
9001663
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 181-198) and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
From the late eighteenth century through the end of the Civil War, Choctaw and Chickasaw Indians bought, sold, and owned Africans and African Americans as slaves, a fact that persisted after the tribes' removal from the Deep South to Indian Territory. Through the end of the nineteenth century, ongoing conflicts among Choctaw, Chickasaw, and U.S. lawmakers left untold numbers of former slaves and their descendants in the two Indian nations without citizenship in either the Indian nations or the United States. In this groundbreaking study, Barbara Krauthamer rewrites the history of southern slavery, emancipation, race, and citizenship to reveal the centrality of Native American slaveholders and the black people they enslaved.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"A brilliant exploration of the entangled histories of African American slavery and Indian dispossession. Rich, superbly researched, and fascinating."--Stephanie M.H. Camp, University of Washington, Seattle
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Summaries
Main Description
From the late eighteenth century through the end of the Civil War, Choctaw and Chickasaw Indians bought, sold, and owned Africans and African Americans as slaves, a fact that persisted after the tribes' removal from the Deep South to Indian Territory. The tribes formulated racial and gender ideologies that justified this practice and marginalized free black people in the Indian nations well after the Civil War and slavery had ended. Through the end of the nineteenth century, ongoing conflicts among Choctaw, Chickasaw, and U.S. lawmakers left untold numbers of former slaves and their descendants in the two Indian nations without citizenship in either the Indian nations or the United States. In this groundbreaking study, Barbara Krauthamer rewrites the history of southern slavery, emancipation, race, and citizenship to reveal the centrality of Native American slaveholders and the black people they enslaved. Krauthamer's examination of slavery and emancipation highlights the ways Indian women's gender roles changed with the arrival of slavery and changed again after emancipation and reveals complex dynamics of race that shaped the lives of black people and Indians both before and after removal.

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