Catalogue

COVID-19: Updates on library services and operations.

Miera y Pacheco : a Renaissance Spaniard in eighteenth-century New Mexico /
John L. Kessell ; illustrations by Bernardo de Miera y Pacheco.
imprint
Norman : University of Oklahoma Press, [2013], c2013
description
xviii, 194 p.
ISBN
0806143770 (hbk. : alk. paper), 9780806143774 (hbk. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Norman : University of Oklahoma Press, [2013], c2013
isbn
0806143770 (hbk. : alk. paper)
9780806143774 (hbk. : alk. paper)
contents note
Estefania's prometido -- Just long enough in El Paso -- A patron -- The year 1760 -- Artist for hire and rancher -- A vision quest with the friars -- Anza in command -- "To die in Your Royal service".
catalogue key
9001648
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 179-185) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"In Miera y Pacheco, master narrative historian John L. Kessell reveals the multiple careers of don Bernardo de Miera y Pacheco, cartographer, artist, and keen observer of eighteenth-century New Mexico. This is a long-overdue biography, and it is essential reading for understanding an extraordinarily gifted man who led a remarkable life in the late Spanish colonial period."-- Richard Flint , author of No Settlement, No Conquest: A History of the Coronado Entrada
"In Miera y Pacheco , master narrative historian John L. Kessell reveals the multiple careers of don Bernardo de Miera y Pacheco, cartographer, artist, and writer on seventeenth-century New Mexico. This is a long-overdue biography, and it is essential reading for understanding an extraordinarily gifted man who led a remarkable life in the late Spanish colonial period." Richard Flint , author of No Settlement, No Conquest: A History of the Coronado Entrada
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Remembered today as an early cartographer and prolific religious artist, don Bernardo de Miera y Pacheco (1713-1785) engaged during his lifetime in a surprising array of other pursuits: engineer and militia captain on Indian campaigns, district officer, merchant, debt collector, metallurgist, luckless silver miner, presidial soldier, dam builder, and rancher. This long-overdue, richly illustrated biography recounts Mieras complex life in cinematic detail, from his birth in Cantabria, Spain, to his sudden and unexplained appearance at Janos, Chihuahua, and his death in Santa Fe at age seventy-one. In "Miera y Pacheco," John L. Kessell explores each aspect of this Renaissance mans life in the colony. Beginning with his marriage to the young descendant of a once-prominent New Mexican family, we see Miera transformed by his varied experiences into the quintessential Hispanic New Mexican. As he traveled to every corner of the colony and beyond, Miera gathered not only geographical, social, and political data but also invaluable information about the Southwests indigenous peoples. At the same time, Miera the artist was carving and painting statues and panels of the saints for the altar screens of the colony. Mieras most ambitious surviving map resulted from his five-month ordeal as cartographer on the Dominguez-Escalante expedition to the Great Basin in 1776. Two years later, with the arrival of famed Juan Bautista de Anza as governor of New Mexico, Miera became a trusted member of Anzas inner circle, advising him on civil, military, and Indian affairs. Mieras maps and his religious art, represented here, have long been considered essential to the cultural history of colonial New Mexico. Now Kessells biography tells the rest of the story. Anyone with an interest in southwestern history, colonial New Mexico, or New Spain will welcome this study of Miera y Pachecos eventful life and times.
Main Description
Remembered today as an early cartographer and prolific religious artist, don Bernardo de Miera y Pacheco (1713--1785) engaged during his lifetime in a surprising array of other pursuits: engineer and militia captain on Indian campaigns, district officer, merchant, debt collector, metallurgist, luckless silver miner, presidial soldier, dam builder, and rancher. This long-overdue, richly illustrated biography recounts Miera's complex life in cinematic detail, from his birth in Cantabria, Spain, to his sudden and unexplained appearance at Janos, Chihuahua, and his death in Santa Fe at age seventy-one. In Miera y Pacheco , John L. Kessell explores each aspect of this Renaissance man's life in the colony. Beginning with his marriage to the young descendant of a once-prominent New Mexican family, we see Miera transformed by his varied experiences into the quintessential Hispanic New Mexican. As he traveled to every corner of the colony and beyond, Miera gathered not only geographical, social, and political data but also invaluable information about the Southwest's indigenous peoples. At the same time, Miera the artist was carving and painting statues and panels of the saints for the altar screens of the colony. Miera's most ambitious surviving map resulted from his five-month ordeal as cartographer on the Domínguez-Escalante expedition to the Great Basin in 1776. Two years later, with the arrival of famed Juan Bautista de Anza as governor of New Mexico, Miera became a trusted member of Anza's inner circle, advising him on civil, military, and Indian affairs. Miera's maps and his religious art, represented here, have long been considered essential to the cultural history of colonial New Mexico. Now Kessell's biography tells the rest of the story. Anyone with an interest in southwestern history, colonial New Mexico, or New Spain will welcome this study of Miera y Pacheco's eventful life and times.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem