Catalogue

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Rights of man ; Common sense /
Thomas Paine ; with an introduction by Michael Foot.
imprint
New York : Knopf, c1994.
description
lii, 306 p. ; 21 cm.
ISBN
0679433147
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
uniform title
series title
imprint
New York : Knopf, c1994.
isbn
0679433147
general note
A Borzoi book.
catalogue key
9001426
 
Includes bibliographical references.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"[Thomas Paine] accepted [no] definitions or frontiers, claiming to be the first of a new breed necessary to save mankind and womankind: a citizen of the world . . . Well beyond his own lifetime it was the power of his pen that restored his vision of the world as it might be . . . America made Thomas Paineand he helped to make America." from the Introduction by Michael Foot
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Summaries
Main Description
(Book Jacket Status: Jacketed) The authorities in power in England during Thomas Paine's lifetime saw him as an agent provocateur who used his seditious eloquence to support the emancipation of slaves and women, the demands of working people, and the rebels of the French and American Revolutions. History, on the other hand, has come to regard him as the figure who gave political cogency to the liberating ideas of the Enlightenment. His great pamphlets,Rights of ManandCommon Sense, are now recognized for what they areclassic arguments in defense of the individual's right to assert his or her freedom in the face of tyranny.
Main Description
(Book Jacket Status: Jacketed) The authorities in power in England during Thomas Paine's lifetime saw him as an agent provocateur who used his seditious eloquence to support the emancipation of slaves and women, the demands of working people, and the rebels of the French and American Revolutions. History, on the other hand, has come to regard him as the figure who gave political cogency to the liberating ideas of the Enlightenment. His great pamphlets, Rights of Man and Common Sense, are now recognized for what they areclassic arguments in defense of the individual's right to assert his or her freedom in the face of tyranny.
Main Description
The authorities in power in England during Thomas Paine's lifetime saw him as an agent provocateur who used his seditious eloquence to support the emancipation of slaves and women, the demands of working people, and the rebels of the French and American Revolutions. History, on the other hand, has come to regard him as the figure who gave political cogency to the liberating ideas of the Enlightenment. His great pamphlets, Rights of Man and Common Sense, are now recognized for what they areclassic arguments in defense of the individual's right to assert his or her freedom in the face of tyranny.
Main Description
Two works in one volume.
Unpaid Annotation
History has come to regard him as the figure who gave political cogency to the liberating ideas of the Enlightenment, and his great pamphlets, Common Sense and Rights of Man, are seen as classic arguments in defense of the individual's right to assert his or her freedom in the face of tyranny.

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