Catalogue


Emancipation Day : a novel /
Wayne Grady.
imprint
[Toronto] : Doubleday Canada, c2013.
description
330 pages ; 23 cm.
ISBN
9780385677660
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
author
imprint
[Toronto] : Doubleday Canada, c2013.
isbn
9780385677660
catalogue key
9000565
 
Issued also in electronic format.
Purchase; DSO; 2013; RB309934.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"This finely wrought novel navigates the complexities of love, race, and loyalties of choice. With a deft hand, Grady convinces us that whatever appearances may suggest, nothing is ever black and white." --Vincent Lam, author of The Headmaster's Wager and Bloodletting and Miraculous Cures "A haunting, memorable, believable portrait of a man so desperate to deny his heritage that he imperils his very soul." --Lawrence Hill, author of The Book of Negroes "A brave book to challenge every reader's thinking on race, family, fear, and love. Profound and compelling." --Annabel Lyon, author of The Golden Mean and The Sweet Girl "Wayne Grady's masterful novel is a compelling story about secrets and shame, denial and self-discovery, racism, and love that goes deeper than skin deep. Grady shows how the ties of family bind and also set us free. This novel is unforgettable." --Lisa Moore, author of Alligator "Wayne Grady has created characters out of life, out of love, out of recognition and sympathy. They are not to be missed." --Linda Spalding, author of The Purchase
"This finely wrought novel navigates the complexities of love, race, and loyalties of choice. With a deft hand, Grady convinces us that whatever appearances may suggest, nothing is ever black and white." -Vincent Lam, author of The Headmaster's Wager and Bloodletting and Miraculous Cures "A haunting, memorable, believable portrait of a man so desperate to deny his heritage that he imperils his very soul." -Lawrence Hill, author of The Book of Negroes "A brave book to challenge every reader's thinking on race, family, fear, and love. Profound and compelling." -Annabel Lyon, author of The Golden Mean and The Sweet Girl "Wayne Grady has created characters out of life, out of love, out of recognition and sympathy. They are not to be missed." -Linda Spalding, author of The Purchase
"A stellar debut. This literary novel is set in the heart of the big-band era.... The music swings. So does the story. Though Grady portrays the complexities of race and racial politics, there's nothing overtly didactic here. It's a novel of ideas that succeeds precisely because it's also a good story." --Winnipeg Free Press "This finely wrought novel navigates the complexities of love, race, and loyalties of choice. With a deft hand, Grady convinces us that whatever appearances may suggest, nothing is ever black and white." --Vincent Lam, author of The Headmaster's Wager and Bloodletting and Miraculous Cures "A haunting, memorable, believable portrait of a man so desperate to deny his heritage that he imperils his very soul." --Lawrence Hill, author of The Book of Negroes "A brave book to challenge every reader's thinking on race, family, fear, and love. Profound and compelling." --Annabel Lyon, author of The Golden Mean and The Sweet Girl "Wayne Grady's masterful novel is a compelling story about secrets and shame, denial and self-discovery, racism, and love that goes deeper than skin deep. Grady shows how the ties of family bind and also set us free. This novel is unforgettable." --Lisa Moore, author of Alligator "Wayne Grady has created characters out of life, out of love, out of recognition and sympathy. They are not to be missed." --Linda Spalding, author of The Purchase
This item was reviewed in:
Globe & Mail, August 2013
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Summaries
Main Description
How far would a son go to belong? And how far would a father go to protect him? With his curly black hair and his wicked grin, everyone swoons and thinks of Frank Sinatra when Navy musician Jackson Lewis takes the stage. It's World War II, and while stationed in St. John's, Newfoundland, Jack meets the well-heeled, romantic Vivian Clift, a local girl who has never stepped off the Rock and is desperate to see the world. They marry against Vivian's family's wishes--hard to say what it is, but there's something about Jack that they just don't like--and as the war draws to a close, the new couple travels to Windsor to meet Jack's family. But when Vivian meets Jack's mother and brother, everything she thought she knew about her new husband gets called into question. They don't live in the dream home that Jack depicted, they all look different from one another--and different from anyone Vivian has ever seen--and after weeks of waiting to meet Jack's father, William Henry, he never materializes. Steeped in jazz and big-band music, spanning pre- and post-war Windsor-Detroit, St. John's, Newfoundland, and 1950s Toronto, this is an arresting, heartwrenching novel about fathers and sons, love and sacrifice, race relations and a time in our history when the world was on the cusp of momentous change.

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