Catalogue


To see the Saw movies : essays on torture porn and post-9/11 horror /
edited by James Aston and John Walliss.
imprint
Jefferson, North Carolina : McFarland & Company, Inc., Publishers, c2013.
description
v, 199 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0786470895 (Paper), 9780786470891 (Paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Jefferson, North Carolina : McFarland & Company, Inc., Publishers, c2013.
isbn
0786470895 (Paper)
9780786470891 (Paper)
abstract
"This collection addresses the Saw franchise--the highest grossing horror series of all time. The films are often derided as "torture porn." This collection addresses the cultural, religious and philosophical themes that run through the films; how the series explores such issues as freewill and determinism; representations of the body; and a Deleuzian perspective to the franchise"--
catalogue key
8994083
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Main Description
This is the first edited collection addressing the Saw franchise, which to date is the highest grossing horror series of all time. The films are often derided by critics as torture porn, and as just an excuse to show blood and gore. This collection of fresh essays by academic authors from Europe, America and Australia addresses the cultural, religious and philosophical themes that run through the films, covering such themes as how the franchise reflects a post-9/11 shift in U.S. popular culture towards increasing pessimism and how it may be read as a metaphor for the subsequent war on terror ; how the series explores such issues as freewill and determinism; representations of the body; and a Deleuzian perspective to the franchise.
Bowker Data Service Summary
The 'Saw' films are often derided by critics as 'torture porn,' and as just an excuse to show blood and gore. This collection of fresh essays by academic authors from Europe, America and Australia addresses the cultural, religious and philosophical themes that run through the films, covering many themes often overlooked by casual observers.
Main Description
The Saw films, often derided by critics as "torture porn" and an excuse to show blood and gore, are the highest-grossing horror series in cinema history. In view of their hold on audiences and their controversial content, they deserve study. This first collection of fresh essays by academic authors from Europe, America and Australia addresses the cultural, religious and philosophical facets of the films, investigating how the franchise reflects a post-9/11 shift in U.S. popular culture towards increasing pessimism and how it may be read as a metaphor for the "war on terror"; dissecting how the series explores such issues as freewill and determinism; assessing the films' representations of the body; and applying a Deleuzian perspective to the franchise.
Table of Contents
Introductionp. 1
"I've never murdered anyone in my life. The decisions are up to them": Ethical Guidance and the Turn Toward Cultural Pessimismp. 13
Body Horrorp. 30
The Spectacle of Correction: Video Games, Movies and Controlp. 45
From Jigsaw to Phibes: God, Free Will and Foreknowledge in Conflictp. 73
A Voice and Something More: Jigsaw as AcousmĂȘtre and Existential Gurup. 86
Twisted Pictures: Morality, Nihilism and Symbolic Suicidep. 105
The Jigsaw Assemblagep. 123
Work Is Hell: Life in the Mannequin Factoryp. 139
Monstrous Bodies and Gendered Abjectionp. 157
Hearing the Game: Sound Designp. 176
About the Contributorsp. 195
Indexp. 197
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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