Catalogue


The world of the Fullo : work, economy, and society in Roman Italy /
Miko Flohr.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
Oxford (Great Clarendon Street, Oxford, OX2 6DP) : Oxford University Press, 2013.
description
xvi, 401 p., [16] p. of plates : ill., map, plans ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0199659354 (hbk.), 9780199659357 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Oxford (Great Clarendon Street, Oxford, OX2 6DP) : Oxford University Press, 2013.
isbn
0199659354 (hbk.)
9780199659357 (hbk.)
catalogue key
8988719
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [357]-379) and index.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Long Description
The World of the 'Fullo' takes a detailed look at the fullers, craftsmen who dealt with high-quality garments, of Roman Italy. Analyzing the social and economic worlds in which the fullers lived and worked, it tells the story of their economic circumstances, the way they organized their workshops, the places where they worked in the city, and their everyday lives on the shop floor and beyond.Through focusing on the lower segments of society, Flohr uses everyday work as the major organizing principle of the narrative: the volume discusses the decisions taken by those responsible for the organization of work, and how these decisions subsequently had an impact on the social lives of people carrying out the work. It emphasizes how socio-economic differences between cities resulted in fundamentally different working lives for many of their people, and that not only were economicactivities shaped by Roman society, they in turn played a key role in shaping it. Using an in-depth and qualitative analysis of material remains related to economic activities, with a combined study of epigraphic and literary records, this volume portrays an insightful view of the socio-economic history of urban communities in the Roman world.
Main Description
The World of the 'Fullo' takes a detailed look at the craftsmen who dealt with high-quality garments in Roman Italy. Analyzing the social and economic worlds in which the fullers lived and worked, it tells the story of their economic circumstances and their everyday lives on the shop floor and beyond.Through focusing on the lower segments of society, Flohr uses everyday work as the major organizing principle of the narrative. Itemphasizes how socioeconomic differences between cities resulted in fundamentally different working lives for many of their people, and that not only were economic activities shaped by Roman society, they in turn played a key role in shaping it. Using an in-depth and qualitative analysis ofmaterial remains related to economic activities, with a combined study of epigraphic and literary records, this volume portrays an insightful view of the socioeconomic history of urban communities in the Roman world.
Main Description
The World of the 'Fullo' takes a detailed look at the fullers, craftsmen who dealt with high-quality garments, of Roman Italy. Analyzing the social and economic worlds in which the fullers lived and worked, it tells the story of their economic circumstances, the way they organized theirworkshops, the places where they worked in the city, and their everyday lives on the shop floor and beyond.Through focusing on the lower segments of society, Flohr uses everyday work as the major organizing principle of the narrative: the volume discusses the decisions taken by those responsible for the organization of work, and how these decisions subsequently had an impact on the social lives of peoplecarrying out the work. It emphasizes how socio-economic differences between cities resulted in fundamentally different working lives for many of their people, and that not only were economic activities shaped by Roman society, they in turn played a key role in shaping it. Using an in-depth and qualitative analysis of material remains related to economic activities, with a combined study of epigraphic and literary records, this volume portrays an insightful view of the socio-economic history of urban communities in the Roman world.
Main Description
The World of the Fullotakes a detailed look at the fullers, craftsmen who dealt with high-quality garments, of Roman Italy. Analyzing the social and economic worlds in which the fullers lived and worked, it tells the story of their economic circumstances, the way they organized their workshops, the places where they worked in the city, and their everyday lives on the shop floor and beyond. Through focusing on the lower segments of society, Flohr uses everyday work as the major organizing principle of the narrative: the volume discusses the decisions taken by those responsible for the organization of work, and how these decisions subsequently had an impact on the social lives of people carrying out the work. It emphasizes how socio-economic differences between cities resulted in fundamentally different working lives for many of their people, and that not only were economic activities shaped by Roman society, they in turn played a key role in shaping it. Using an in-depth and qualitative analysis of material remains related to economic activities, with a combined study of epigraphic and literary records, this volume portrays an insightful view of the socio-economic history of urban communities in the Roman world.
Table of Contents
List of Figuresp. xi
List of Plansp. xvii
List of Abbreviationsp. xviii
Introductionp. 1
The Roman economy debatep. 6
Fullones and fullonicae: evidence for fullingp. 12
Contextualizing the datap. 35
History of researchp. 43
The economy of fullingp. 52
The textile economy of Roman Italyp. 53
Who needs the fullo? Understanding demandp. 57
Approaching the evidencep. 72
A geography of consumptionp. 84
Discussionp. 93
The rational workshopp. 96
The fulling processp. 98
Investing in equipmentp. 121
Organizing the shop floorp. 149
Running the workshopp. 170
Discussionp. 179
Fulling and the urban environmentp. 181
The environmental effects of fullingp. 184
Living and working in a fullonicap. 189
Fulling and public spacep. 211
The urban geography of fullingp. 227
Discussionp. 239
Populating the fullonicap. 242
Towards a social network perspectivep. 242
Social interaction on the shop floorp. 246
The social basis of staff networksp. 265
Differentiation and hierarchyp. 273
Discussionp. 286
Fullones and Roman societyp. 288
Hierarchy and autonomyp. 289
Social ties with the urban communityp. 309
Being a 'fullo'p. 322
Discussionp. 346
Epiloguep. 350
Bibliographyp. 357
Plansp. 381
Indexp. 397
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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