Catalogue

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Forces for good? : military masculinities and peacebuilding in Afghanistan and Iraq /
Claire Duncanson, Lecturer, School of Social and Political Science, University of Edinburgh, UK.
imprint
Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire ; New York, NY : Palgrave Macmillan, 2013.
description
xiii, 193 p.
ISBN
0230282261 (hardback), 9780230282261 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire ; New York, NY : Palgrave Macmillan, 2013.
isbn
0230282261 (hardback)
9780230282261 (hardback)
contents note
Machine generated contents note: -- Acknowledgements -- List of Abbreviations -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Can Soldiers Ever Be Used to Achieve Peace? Feminists Debate Military Intervention -- 3. What Can We Learn From Soldiers' Personal Narratives? Methodologies and Methods -- 4. British Soldier Identity and the Warfighting Ethos -- 5. British Soldiers Doing and Undoing Empire in Iraq and Afghanistan -- 6. Regendered Soldiers and the Transformation of Hegemonic Masculinity -- 7. Conclusion.
abstract
"Forces for Good? explores British soldier 'herographies' to identify constructions of gender, race, class and nation and their consequences on complex, multi-dimensional operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. This book aims to intervene in the debates within critical feminist scholarship over whether soldiers can ever be agents of peace. Many feminist analyses of military intervention point to the way in which interventions are legitimated by gendered narratives where representatives of civilization are tasked with addressing violent conflict in troubled lands, a story which distracts from the root causes of the violence and enables the furthering of a neoliberal agenda. This book advances this critique by adding the important but hitherto neglected case of the British Army, and challenges its determinism, which Duncanson argues to be normatively, empirically and theoretically problematic.Exploring the impact of identity and gender constructions on the prospects for successful peacebuilding, this book will appeal to a range of scholars in politics, international relations, peace studies, gender and women's studies, sociology and anthropology. "--
catalogue key
8967427
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 171-191) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Claire Duncanson is a Lecturer in International Relations in the School of Social and Political Science at the University of Edinburgh, UK. Her research and teaching is focused at the intersection of international security, international development and gender politics.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
'Forces for Good?' explores British soldier 'herographies' to identify constructions of gender, race, class and nation and their consequences on complex, multi-dimensional operations in Iraq and Afghanistan.
Long Description
Forces for Good? explores British soldier 'herographies' to identify constructions of gender, race, class and nation and their consequences on complex, multi-dimensional operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. This book aims to intervene in the debates within critical feminist scholarship over whether soldiers can ever be agents of peace.Many feminist analyses of military intervention point to the way in which interventions are legitimated by gendered narratives where representatives of civilization are tasked with addressing violent conflict in troubled lands, a story which distracts from the root causes of the violence and enables the furthering of a neoliberal agenda. This book advances this critique by adding the important but hitherto neglected case of the British Army, and challenges its determinism, which Duncanson argues to be normatively, empirically and theoretically problematic. Exploring the impact of identity and gender constructions on the prospects for successful peacebuilding, this book will appeal to a range of scholars in politics, international relations, peace studies, gender and women's studies, sociology and anthropology.
Main Description
Forces for Good? explores British soldier 'herographies' to identify constructions of gender, race, class and nation and their consequences on complex, multi-dimensional operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. This book aims to intervene in the debates within critical feminist scholarship over whether soldiers can ever be agents of peace. Many feminist analyses of military intervention point to the way in which interventions are legitimated by gendered narratives where representatives of civilization are tasked with addressing violent conflict in troubled lands, a story which distracts from the root causes of the violence and enables the furthering of a neoliberal agenda. This book advances this critique by adding the important but hitherto neglected case of the British Army, and challenges its determinism, which Duncanson argues to be normatively, empirically and theoretically problematic. Exploring the impact of identity and gender constructions on the prospects for successful peacebuilding, this book will appeal to a range of scholars in politics, international relations, peace studies, gender and women's studies, sociology and anthropology.
Main Description
Forces for Good? explores British soldier 'herographies' to identify constructions of gender, race, class and nation and their consequences on complex, multi-dimensional operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. This book aims to intervene in the debates within critical feminist scholarship over whether soldiers can ever be agents of peace. Many feminist analyses of military intervention point to the way in which interventions are legitimated by gendered narratives where representatives of civilization are tasked with addressing violent conflict in troubled lands, a story which distracts from the root causes of the violence and enables the furthering of a neoliberal agenda. This book advances this critique by adding the important but hitherto neglected case of the British Army, and challenges its determinism, which Duncanson argues to be normatively, empirically and theoretically problematic.Exploring the impact of identity and gender constructions on the prospects for successful peacebuilding, this book will appeal to a range of scholars in politics, international relations, peace studies, gender and women's studies, sociology and anthropology.
Main Description
Forces for Good? explores British soldier 'herographies' to identify constructions of gender, race, class and nation and their consequences on complex, multi-dimensional operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. This book aims to intervene in the debates within critical feminist scholarship over whether soldiers can ever be agents of peace.Many feminist analyses of military intervention point to the way in which interventions are legitimated by gendered narratives where representatives of civilization are tasked with addressing violent conflict in troubled lands, a story which distracts from the root causes of the violence and enables the furthering of a neoliberal agenda. This book advances this critique by adding the important but hitherto neglected case of the British Army, and challenges its determinism, which Duncanson argues to be normatively, empirically and theoretically problematic.Exploring the impact of identity and gender constructions on the prospects for successful peacebuilding, this book will appeal to a range of scholars in politics, international relations, peace studies, gender and women's studies, sociology and anthropology.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgementsp. vi
Glossary of Acronyms and Termsp. viii
British Soldier Autobiographiesp. xii
Introductionp. 1
Can Soldiers Ever Be Used to Achieve Peace? Feminists Debate Military Interventionp. 18
What Can We Learn from Soldiers' Narratives? Methodologies and Methodsp. 52
British Soldier Identities and the War-Fighting Ethosp. 72
British Soldiers Doing and Undoing Empire in Iraq and Afghanistanp. 403
Regendered Soldiers and the Transformation of Hegemonic Masculinityp. 134
Conclusionp. 161
Notesp. 165
Bibliographyp. 171
Indexp. 192
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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