Catalogue

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Government by dissent : protest, resistance, and radical democratic thought in the early American republic /
Robert W.T. Martin.
imprint
New York : New York University Press, 2013, c2013
description
xi, 262 p.
ISBN
0814738249 (cl : alk. paper), 9780814738245 (cl : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : New York University Press, 2013, c2013
isbn
0814738249 (cl : alk. paper)
9780814738245 (cl : alk. paper)
contents note
Introduction -- Regulation not rebellion : from "rough music" to democratic disorder -- "Secret plodders" : anti-federalism, anonymity, and the struggle for democratic dissent -- Institutionalizing counterpublicity : the democratic societies of the 1790s -- James Madison : public opinion and dissentient democracy -- "Salutary collisions" and multiple discourses : a farmer, two lawyers, and one unknown democrat -- "The saucy sons of enquiry" : Thomas Cooper and democratic dissent -- Conclusion.
catalogue key
8967216
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 243-255) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Martin has given us a gifta timely reminder that ours is a nation born in dissent and nourished on disagreement. With a wealth of illustrative cases he reminds us that we Americans are and always have been a fractious people, and our democracy all the more vital for that."-Terence Ball,Arizona State University
"The most thorough examination we have of how early Americans wrestled with what types of political dissent should be permitted, even promoted, in the new republic they were forming. Martin shows the modern relevance of their debates in ways that all will find valuableeven those who dissent from his views!"-Rogers M. Smith,Christopher H. Browne Distinguished Professor of Political Science, University of Pennsylvania
"The most thorough examination we have of how early Americans wrestled with what types of political dissent should be permitted, even promoted, in the new republic they were forming. Martin shows the modern relevance of their debates in ways that all will find valuable - even those who dissent from his views!" Rogers M. Smith, Christopher H. Browne Distinguished Professor of Political Science, University of Pennsylvania "Martin has given us a gift - a timely reminder that ours is a nation born in dissent and nourished on disagreement. With a wealth of illustrative cases he reminds us that we Americans are and always have been a fractious people, and our democracy all the more vital for that." Terence Ball, Arizona State University
"The most thorough examination we have of how early Americans wrestled with what types of political dissent should be permitted, even promoted, in the new republic they were forming. Martin shows the modern relevance of their debates in ways that all will find valuable-even those who dissent from his views!" Rogers M. Smith, Christopher H. Browne Distinguished Professor of Political Science, University of Pennsylvania "Martin has given us a gift-a timely reminder that ours is a nation born in dissent and nourished on disagreement. With a wealth of illustrative cases he reminds us that we Americans are and always have been a fractious people, and our democracy all the more vital for that." Terence Ball, Arizona State University
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
We generally think of democracy as government by consent; a government of, by, and for the people. We commonly downplay or even denigrate the role of dissent in democratic governments. But in this book, Martin explores the idea that the people most important in a flourishing democracy are those who challenge the status quo.
Main Description
"The most thorough examination we have of how early Americans wrestled with what types of political dissent should be permitted, even promoted, in the new republic they were forming.Martin shows the modern relevance of their debates in ways that all will find valuableeven those who dissent from his views!" Rogers M. Smith, Christopher H. Browne Distinguished Professor of Political Science, University of Pennsylvania We generally think of democracy as government by consent; a government of, by, and for the people.We commonly downplay or even denigrate the role of dissent in democratic governments. But in Government by Dissent, Robert W.T. Martin explores the idea that the people most important in a flourishing democracy are those who challenge the status quo. The American political radicals of the 1790s understood, articulated, and defended the crucial necessity of dissent to democracy. Dissent has rarely been the mainstream of democratic politics. But the figures explored hereforgotten farmers as well as revered framersunderstood that dissent is always the essential undercurrent of democracy and is often the critical crosscurrent. Only by returning to their political insights can we hope to reinvigorate our own popular politics. Robert W.T. Martinis Professor of Government and Chair of the Government Department at Hamilton College. His works includeThe Free and Open Press: The Founding of American Democratic Press Liberty, 1640-1800 (2001), andThe Many Faces of Alexander Hamilton(co-edited with Douglas Ambrose, 2006), both from NYU Press.
Main Description
"The most thorough examination we have of how early Americans wrestled with what types of political dissent should be permitted, even promoted, in the new republic they were forming.Martin shows the modern relevance of their debates in ways that all will find valuableeven those who dissent from his views!" Rogers M. Smith, Christopher H. Browne Distinguished Professor of Political Science, University of Pennsylvania We generally think of democracy as government by consent; a government of, by, and for the people.We commonly downplay or even denigrate the role of dissent in democratic governments. But inGovernment by Dissent, Robert W.T. Martin explores the idea that the people most important in a flourishing democracy are those who challenge the status quo. The American political radicals of the 1790s understood, articulated, and defended the crucial necessity of dissent to democracy. Dissent has rarely been the mainstream of democratic politics. But the figures explored hereforgotten farmers as well as revered framersunderstood that dissent is always the essential undercurrent of democracy and is often the critical crosscurrent. Only by returning to their political insights can we hope to reinvigorate our own popular politics. Robert W.T. Martin is Professor of Government and Chair of the Government Department at Hamilton College. His works include The Free and Open Press: The Founding of American Democratic Press Liberty, 1640-1800 (2001), and The Many Faces of Alexander Hamilton (co-edited with Douglas Ambrose, 2006), both from NYU Press.
Main Description
We generally think of democracy as government by consent; a government of, by, and for the people. We commonly downplay or even denigrate the role of dissent in democratic governments. But in Government by Dissent , Robert W.T. Martin explores the idea that the people most important in a flourishing democracy are those who challenge the status quo. The American political radicals of the 1790s understood, articulated, and defended the crucial necessity of dissent to democracy. Dissent has rarely been the mainstream of democratic politics. But the figures explored here - forgotten farmers as well as revered framers - understood that dissent is always the essential undercurrent of democracy and is often the critical crosscurrent. Only by returning to their political insights can we hope to reinvigorate our own popular politics. Robert W.T. Martin is Professor of Government and Chair of the Government Department at Hamilton College. His works include The Free and Open Press: The Founding of American Democratic Press Liberty, 1640-1800 (2001), and The Many Faces of Alexander Hamilton (co-edited with Douglas Ambrose, 2006), both from NYU Press.
Main Description
We generally think of democracy as government by consent; a government of, by, and for the people. We commonly downplay or even denigrate the role of dissent in democratic governments. But in Government by Dissent, Robert W.T. Martin explores the idea that the people most important in a flourishing democracy are those who challenge the status quo. The American political radicals of the 1790s understood, articulated, and defended the crucial necessity of dissent to democracy. Dissent has rarely been the mainstream of democratic politics. But the figures explored here-forgotten farmers as well as revered framers-understood that dissent is always the essential undercurrent of democracy and is often the critical crosscurrent. Only by returning to their political insights can we hope to reinvigorate our own popular politics. Robert W.T. Martin is Professor of Government and Chair of the Government Department at Hamilton College. His works include The Free and Open Press: The Founding of American Democratic Press Liberty, 1640-1800 (2001), and The Many Faces of Alexander Hamilton (co-edited with Douglas Ambrose, 2006), both from NYU Press.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Note on the Textp. xi
Introductionp. 1
Regulation, Not Rebellion: From "Rough Music" to Democratic Disorderp. 21
"Secret Plodders": Anti-Federalism, Anonymity, and the Struggle for Democratic Dissentp. 55
Institutionalizing Counterpublicity: The Democratic Societies of the 1790sp. 83
James Madison: Public Opinion and Dissentient Democracyp. 115
"Salutary Collisions" and Multiple Discourses: A Farmer, a Lawyer, and Two Unknown Democratsp. 147
The "Saucy Sons of Enquiry": Thomas Cooper and Democratic Dissentp. 177
Conclusionp. 197
Notesp. 207
Bibliographyp. 243
Indexp. 257
About the Authorp. 262
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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