Catalogue


Aristocratic vice : the attack on duelling, suicide, adultery, and gambling in eighteenth-century England /
Donna T. Andrew.
imprint
New Haven : Yale University Press, [2013], c2013
description
x, 318 p.
ISBN
0300184336 (cloth : alk. paper), 9780300184334 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New Haven : Yale University Press, [2013], c2013
isbn
0300184336 (cloth : alk. paper)
9780300184334 (cloth : alk. paper)
contents note
Introduction: the middle way: cultural skirmishes -- Contesting cultural authority: the code of honor and its critics -- "That wild decision of the private sword" -- Against "nature, religion and good manners": debating suicide -- "The chief topics of conversation": adultery and divorce in the Bon Ton -- Deserving "most the cognizance of the magistrate and the censor": combating gaming -- Vice in an age of respectability -- Conclusion: an end to aristocratic vice?
catalogue key
8967214
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 303-313) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Donna Andrew continues to illuminate the mental landscapes of eighteenth-century Britain. . . . No historian of the period has made greater or more effective use of the newspaper press as a source for cultural history than she. This book is evidently the product of a great deal of work and is likely to stimulate further work."-Joanna Innes, University of Oxford
"Donna Andrew continues to illuminate the mental landscapes of eighteenth-century Britain. No historian of the period has made greater or more effective use of the newspaper press as a source for cultural history than she. This book is evidently the product of a great deal of work and is likely to stimulate further work."--Joanna Innes, University of Oxford
"Donna Andrew's splendid exploration of the cultural skirmishes over aristocratic vice makes a vital contribution to our understanding of the middling presence and the public sphere in the long eighteenth century."--Nicholas Rogers, York University
"Donna Andrew's splendid exploration of the cultural skirmishes over aristocratic vice makes a vital contribution to our understanding of the middling presence and the public sphere in the long eighteenth century."-Nicholas Rogers, York University
"I know of no other book or academic article that juxtaposes these four vices and does so through extensive use of the newspaper press, which has until recently been under-explored. Andrew has demonstrated an impressive knowledge of the contents of 18th-century newspapers and she brings great familiarity with non-canonical sources around morality (notably sermons and pamphlet literature)."--Sarah Lloyd, University of Hertfordshire
"I know of no other book or academic article that juxtaposes these four vices and does so through extensive use of the newspaper press, which has until recently been under-explored. Andrew has demonstrated an impressive knowledge of the contents of 18th-century newspapers and she brings great familiarity with non-canonical sources around morality (notably sermons and pamphlet literature)."-Sarah Lloyd, University of Hertfordshire
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This title examines the outrage against - and attempts to end - the four vices associated with the artistocracy in 18th century in England: duelling, suicide, adultery, and gambling. All four, it was commonly believed, owed their origin to pride.
Description for Bookstore
Aristocratic Vice examines the outrage against the four vices associated with the aristocracy in eighteenth-century England-duelling, suicide, adultery, and gambling-and the subsequent emergence of the middle class.
Description for Bookstore
Aristocratic Vice examines the outrage against the four vices associated with the aristocracy in eighteenth-century Englandduelling, suicide, adultery, and gamblingand the subsequent emergence of the middle class.
Main Description
Aristocratic Vice examines the outrage against--and attempts to end--the four vices associated with the aristocracy in eighteenth-century England: duelling, suicide, adultery, and gambling. Each of the four, it was commonly believed, owed its origin to pride. Many felt the law did not go far enough to punish those perpetrators who were members of the elite. In this exciting new book, Andrew explores each vice's treatment by the press at the time and shows how a century of public attacks on aristocratic vices promoted a sense of "class superiority" among the soon-to-emerge British middle class. "Donna Andrew continues to illuminate the mental landscapes of eighteenth-century Britain. . . . No historian of the period has made greater or more effective use of the newspaper press as a source for cultural history than she. This book is evidently the product of a great deal of work and is likely to stimulate further work."--Joanna Innes, University of Oxford
Main Description
Aristocratic Vice examines the outrage against-and attempts to end-the four vices associated with the aristocracy in eighteenth-century England: duelling, suicide, adultery, and gambling. Each of the four, it was commonly believed, owed its origin to pride. Many felt the law did not go far enough to punish those perpetrators who were members of the elite. In this exciting new book, Andrew explores each vice's treatment by the press at the time and shows how a century of public attacks on aristocratic vices promoted a sense of "class superiority" among the soon-to-emerge British middle class. "Donna Andrew continues to illuminate the mental landscapes of eighteenth-century Britain. . . . No historian of the period has made greater or more effective use of the newspaper press as a source for cultural history than she. This book is evidently the product of a great deal of work and is likely to stimulate further work."-Joanna Innes, University of Oxford

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