Catalogue


The emblematic queen : extra-literary representations of early modern queenship /
edited by Debra Barrett-Graves.
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2013, c2013
description
x, 234 p.
ISBN
1137303093 (alk. paper), 9781137303097 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
series title
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2013, c2013
isbn
1137303093 (alk. paper)
9781137303097 (alk. paper)
contents note
Introduction: extra-literary emblematics / by Debra Barrett-Graves, California State University, East Bay -- Caterina Cornaro Queen of Cyprus -- Bejewled majesty: Queen Elizabeth I, precious stones and statecraft -- "Bear your body more seeming": open-kneed portraits of Elizabeth I -- Mermaids, sirens, and Mary Queen of Scots: icons of wantonness and pride -- Martyrdom and memory: Elizabeth Curle's portrait of Mary, Queen of Scots -- Anne of Denmark and the court masque: displaying and authoring queenship -- "A lily among thorns": the emblematic eclipse of Spain's Maria Lusa de Orleans in the hieroglyphs of her funeral exequies -- Afterward / by John Watkins, University of Minnesota.
catalogue key
8947553
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 199-217) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Debra Barrett-Graves is Professor of English at California State University, East Bay, USA. Among her publications are Extraordinary Women of the Medieval and Renaissance World (2000) and Elizabeth I: Always Her Own Free Woman (2003). Her article "Edmund Spenser's Use of the Poison-Tipped Tongue in The Faerie Queene" (2005-2006) received the Robert A. Miller Memorial Award.
Reviews
Review Quotes
'Hereditary monarchies have always depended for their very survival on interdynastic marriages and fertile queens, yet the ambiguities of their power and status as women have often been obscured in their historical profiles. As the Renaissance emblem came to play such a central role in symbolic representations of royalty, however, we can now witness those ambiguities and difficulties in the emblematic representation of royal spouses of the early modern period that are explored in the revealing studies that make up this volume.' - Michael Bath, Senior Research Fellow, University of Glasgow, UK and author of Emblems for a Queen: The Needlework of Mary Queen of Scots 'The essays in this volume shine fascinating light on material objects bearing the symbolic images by which Renaissance queens pressed their claims to authority and sought to preserve their fame. In exploring the many interpretive possibilities that arise when royal emblems are seen in relation to competing cultural and political forces in the reigns that produced them, the authors show just how fresh the insights can be when history, art history, and cultural studies come together as intimate friends.' - Donald Stump, Professor of English, Saint Louis University, co-founder of the Queen Elizabeth I Society and co-editor of Elizabeth I and the 'Sovereign Arts' and The Age of Elizabeth
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Summaries
Description for Bookstore
An exploration of representations of early modern female consorts and regnants via extra-literary emblematics such as paintings, jewelry, miniature portraits, carvings, placards, masques, funerary monuments, and imprese.
Long Description
Our interdisciplinary collection of essays provides an engaging study of how Caterina Cornaro, Queen of Cyprus (1454-1510); Queen Elizabeth I of England (1533-1603); Mary Stuart Queen of Scots (1542-1587); Anne of Denmark (1574-1619); and Spain's María Luisa de Orleáns (1662-1689) either succeeded in promoting authority and inspiring loyalty, or, conversely, had identities shaped for them for various political, religious, or cultural reasons. Knowledge of material culture, and how such objects created specific gender identities, reveals new insights into these queens' lives, as they flourished in court, as members of their communities received them, and as individuals appropriated and shaped their reputations during their lives and after their deaths.
Long Description
The lives and literary afterlives of queens consort and regnant were of considerable interest for their early modern contemporaries. References to these women appeared frequently as what have been referred to as 'extra-literary' emblematics, including paintings, jewelry, miniature portraits, carvings, placards, masques, and funerary monuments. Objects such as these were also represented through intertextual allusions in emblematic miscellany collections, mythographic works, and other prominent source materials of the time. Studied together, these ubiquitous aspects of material culture offer genuinely new avenues to understanding how early modern queens negotiated their political power within male-dominated societies. The interdisciplinary analyses gathered here range across art, literature, history, and cultural studies to illustrate just how pervasive emblematic references were in both material culture and the in development of unique identities.
Main Description
The lives and literary afterlives of queens consort and regnant were of considerable interest for their early modern contemporaries. References to these women appeared frequently as what have been referred to as "extra-literary" emblematics, including paintings, jewelry, miniature portraits, carvings, placards, masques, and funerary monuments. Objects such as these were also represented through intertextual allusions in emblematic miscellany collections, mythographic works, and other prominent source materials of the time. Studied together, these ubiquitous aspects of material culture offer genuinely new avenues to understanding how early modern queens negotiated their political power within male-dominated societies. The interdisciplinary analyses gathered here range across art, literature, history, and cultural studies to illustrate just how pervasive emblematic references were in both material culture and the development of unique identities. Book jacket.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Introduction: Extra-Literary Emblematicsp. 1
Caterina Cornaro, Queen of Cyprusp. 11
Bejeweled Majesty: Queen Elizabeth I, Precious Stones, and Statecraftp. 35
"Bear Your Body More Seeming": Open-Kneed Portraits of Elizabethp. 53
Mermaids, Sirens, and Mary, Queen of Scots: Icons of wantonness and Pridep. 69
Martyrdom and Memory: Elizabeth Curie's Portrait of Mary, Queen of Scotsp. 101
Anne of Denmark and the Court Masque: Displaying and Authoring Queenshipp. 133
"A Lily among Thorns": The Emblematic Eclipse of Spain's María Luisa de Orleans in the Hieroglyphs of Her Funeral Exequiesp. 155
Afterwordp. 189
Bibliographyp. 199
Notes on Contributorsp. 219
Indexp. 223
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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