Catalogue


Algernon Charles Swinburne : unofficial laureate /
edited by Catherine Maxwell and Stefano Evangelista.
imprint
Manchester, UK ; New York : Manchester University Press ; New York : Distributed in the U.S. exclusively by Palgrave Macmillan, 2013.
description
xiv, 256 p. : ill., facsims. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0719086256, 9780719086250
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Manchester, UK ; New York : Manchester University Press ; New York : Distributed in the U.S. exclusively by Palgrave Macmillan, 2013.
isbn
0719086256
9780719086250
general note
Papers based on international centenary conference held in London, July 2009.
catalogue key
8944690
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [232]-251) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Catherine Maxwell is Professor of Victorian Literature at Queen Mary, University of London Stefano Evangelista is Fellow and Tutor in English at Trinity College, University of Oxford
Summaries
Long Description
Algernon Charles Swinburne (1837-1909), dramatist, novelist and critic was late Victorian England's unofficial Poet Laureate. Swinburne was admired by his contemporaries for his technical brilliance, his facility with classical and medieval forms, and his courage in expressing his sensual, erotic imagination. His first and best-known verse collection, Poems and Ballads (1866), notable for its consummate craftsmanship and provocative subject matter, created an unrivalled sensation. His radical republican views as expressed in his later political collection Songs before Sunrise (1871) reinforced his reputation as a controversial figure. He was immensely important in his own day but, like several of his contemporaries, suffered neglect and misrepresentation during the first half of the twentieth century. Now, however, Swinburne is acknowledged to be one of the most important Victorian poets, the founding figure for British aestheticism, and the dominant influence for fin-de-siècle and many modernist poets. Forging a vital link between French and English literary culture, he was responsible for promoting avant-garde poets such as Gautier and Baudelaire who would have considerable impact on English decadent writers. This collection of eleven new essays by leading international scholars offers a thorough revaluation of this fascinating and complex figure. It situates him in the light of current critical work on cosmopolitanism, politics, form, Victorian Hellenism, gender and sexuality, the arts, and aestheticism and its contested relation to literary modernism.
Main Description
Algernon Charles Swinburne (1837-1909), dramatist, novelist and critic was late Victorian England's unofficial Poet Laureate. Swinburne was admired by his contemporaries for his technical brilliance, his facility with classical and medieval forms, and his courage in expressing his sensual, erotic imagination. He was one of the most important Victorian poets, the founding figure for British aestheticism, and the dominant influence for fin-de-siècle and many modernist poets. This collection of eleven new essays by leading international scholars offers a thorough revaluation of this fascinating and complex figure. It situates him in the light of current critical work on cosmopolitanism, politics, form, Victorian Hellenism, gender and sexuality, the arts, and aestheticism and its contested relation to literary modernism. The essays in this collection reassess Swinburne's work and reconstruct his vital and often provocative contribution to the Victorian cultural debate.
Table of Contents
List of figuresp. ix
Acknowledgementsp. x
Notes on contributorsp. xi
A note on the textsp. xv
Introductionp. 1
Cultural discourse
Swinburne's French voice: cosmopolitanism and cultural mediation in aesthetic criticismp. 15
Swinburne's swimmers: from insular peace to the Anglo-Boer Warp. 33
Swinburne: a nineteenth-century Hellene?p. 52
A juggler's trick'? Swinburne's journalism 1857-75p. 69
Form
Metrical discipline: Algernon Swinburne on 'The Flogging-Block'p. 95
What goes around: Swinburne's A Century of Roundelsp. 125
Desire lines: Swinburne and lyric crisisp. 138
Influence
'Good Satan': the unlikely poetic affinity of Swinburne and Christina Rossettip. 157
Parleying with Robert Browning: Swinburne's aestheticism, blasphemy, and the dramatic monologuep. 174
Whose muse? Sappho, Swinburne, and Amy Lowellp. 193
Atmosphere and absorption: Swinburne, Eliot, Drinkwaterp. 213
Referencesp. 232
Indexp. 252
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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