Catalogue


Towards a pre-modern psychiatry /
Jenifer Booth.
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2013, c2013
description
xv, 221 p.
ISBN
1137286202 (hardback), 9781137286208 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2013, c2013
isbn
1137286202 (hardback)
9781137286208 (hardback)
catalogue key
8944639
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Jenifer Booth is an independent scholar. She has an MA in Psychiatry, Philosophy and Society from the University of Sheffield, UK, an MLitt in Philosophy (with Distinction) from the University of Dundee and a PhD in Philosophy from the University of Durham. She has worked with the mental health service user movement in Lothian.
Summaries
Description for Bookstore
Applies a modified version of MacIntyre's philosophy to psychiatry with help from Irigaray on psychotherapy.
Long Description
Responding to the work of previous critics of psychiatry, who have associated its undue dominance with both a modern scientific paradigm and political factors, Jenifer Booth puts forward a theoretical challenge based on MacIntyre's work on Aquinas and Aristotle, but adding the museum and assembly as conceptual thinking tools. MacIntyre's work on practices, tradition-constituted enquiry, Marxist ideology and Kuhn are all used in putting forward a pre-modern view of knowledge. The feminist philosophy of Luce Irigaray widens the project to include psychotherapy. Booth puts forward a workable and kind version of psychiatric medicine which sets the work of the mental health service user movement in context. This book should be of value to anyone who has ever wondered why doctors have so much power or who has thought that spiritual and social factors should have more weight in medicine. It will be of interest to moral philosophers, theologians and feminist theologians, philosophers of medicine and museums studies professionals alike.
Main Description
Responding to the work of previous critics of psychiatry, who have associated its undue dominance with both a modern scientific paradigm and political factors, Jenifer Booth puts forward a theoretical challenge based on MacIntyre's work on Aquinas and Aristotle, but adding the museum and assembly as conceptual thinking tools.MacIntyre's work on practices, tradition-constituted enquiry, Marxist ideology and Kuhn are all used in putting forward a pre-modern view of knowledge. The feminist philosophy of Luce Irigaray widens the project to include psychotherapy. Booth puts forward a workable and kind version of psychiatric medicine which sets the work of the mental health service user movement in context.This book should be of value to anyone who has ever wondered why doctors have so much power or who has thought that spiritual and social factors should have more weight in medicine.It will be of interest to moral philosophers, theologians and feminist theologians, philosophers of medicine and museums studies professionals alike.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgementsp. xii
List of Abbreviations in Referencesp. xv
An Outline of the Problemp. 1
Why MacIntyre's Philosophy Can Address This Situationp. 13
Introductionp. 13
Tools for the work of reconstruction: the philosophy of Alasdair MacIntyrep. 14
Features of MacIntyre's work which particularly relate to this project, and an outline of the project (with chapter summaries)p. 21
Why the knowledge framework of Three Rival Versions of Moral Enquiry is importantp. 24
Tradition-constituted enquiry as a response to Kuhn: the role of the museum and the assembly in the projectp. 26
The importance of narrativep. 32
The role of Christianity in Maclntyre's Aristotelianism and his Marxism and in this projectp. 36
The Contemporary Aristotelian Museum as a Way of 'Re-seeing' Knowledgep. 45
Introductionp. 45
The Aristotelian use of the museump. 45
Features emphasised by the Aristotelian use of the museump. 48
Aristotle's concept of theoriap. 48
Knowledge of the world of which the knower forms an integral partp. 49
Aristotle's method of saving 'the appearances' of the opinions of 'the many' and 'the wise'p. 50
The museum-goers judge traditions based on their intelligibilityp. 52
Previously disregarded knowledge of 'the many' is given attentionp. 56
The type of friendship instantiated in the Aristotelian museum is narrative friendshipp. 57
The Aristotelian museum can enhance our practical wisdom towards disadvantaged groups and prioritise practical wisdom over technep. 58
Chapter summaryp. 61
How 'the Many' Can Be Authoritative. 'The Many' Start to Contribute to the Practicep. 62
Introductionp. 62
How can 'the many' be authoritative?p. 62
Replacing the authority of post-holdersp. 65
The assembly as a way of 're-seeing' enquiry as Thomisticp. 66
Speaking patientp. 69
Vulnerability (assemblies should be private where necessary)p. 70
Museums and assemblies used togetherp. 72
Women as serialised by practicesp. 73
Debating practicesp. 74
A diagram of debate about practicesp. 76
The Habermasian approach of Sharon Meagherp. 77
Having communities of narrative friends demands deontological friendsp. 79
Mannersp. 82
Chapter summaryp. 83
MacIntyre's Original Model Adjusted to Take Account of Patiency and Dissentp. 85
The experience of the mental health service user movement allows characterisation of dissent from the practice of psychiatryp. 85
Follyp. 91
Orexis can be rationalp. 92
Folly and practical wisdomp. 93
MacIntyre's dissent against the ideological function of liberalism as an addition to the modelp. 96
Ideology, 'rational myth' and false consciousnessp. 97
MacIntyre's three figures who represent liberal modernity, and their relationship to ideologyp. 99
Chapter summaryp. 102
Psychiatric Medicine: Performing Tradition-constituted Enquiry on the Tradition of the Psychiatristsp. 103
Introductionp. 103
Revising the core concept of mental illness in analytic philosophyp. 104
Dependent Rational Animals provides a model of human nature which protects against eugenicsp. 106
Bringing the tradition of medicine into dialogue with Christianityp. 108
Bringing the tradition of medicine into dialogue with a further aspect of Christianity emphasised by MacIntyre, which allows consideration of ought in mental illnessp. 110
Ideological knowledge in psychiatry: the 'value-free' model of mental illness uses a highly scientific 'rational myth' to impose an oughtp. 111
Scientific knowledge of mental illness is organised from a point of viewp. 112
Getting beyond ideology by negotiation between two sorts of friendship: different roles with respect to the patient, as defined by Goffman and Campbellp. 114
How the narrative sociology of After Virtue relates to the narrative friend of the psychiatric patientp. 114
Chapter summaryp. 117
Collective Advocacy: The Mentally Ill Start to Contribute to a Practicep. 118
Introductionp. 118
The need for dissent from the practice required that a new branch of the practice was formedp. 118
Speaking patient: considerations which apply to the mentally illp. 119
Irrationality: communities of patientsp. 119
Irrationality: ascriptions of reasonsp. 120
Debating a practice: the collective advocacy model is supported by MacIntyre's philosophyp. 122
Advocacy as a branch of universityp. 124
A public health function for psychiatryp. 126
Chapter summaryp. 127
Using Irigaray's Philosophy to Overcome the Technical Paradigm in Psychotherapyp. 128
Introductionp. 128
What is psychotherapy?p. 129
Irigaray's critique of Freudp. 132
Irigaray on Lacan's 'phallocentric symbolic order'p. 135
A local embodied reality from which the current symbolic order can be criticisedp. 138
Our conception of the imaginary changesp. 144
Irigaray provides an account of wisdom in dealing with sexual difference (Irigaray's Ethics of Sexual Difference)p. 145
Dealing with sexual difference and how one should approach sinp. 147
Group therapyp. 152
A substitute for prayer?p. 153
Ingleby's argument that psychotherapy belongs in the alternative paradigmp. 154
Chapter summaryp. 156
Psychiatry as a Nurturing Practicep. 157
Introductionp. 157
Objectivity in nurturing practicesp. 158
Examples of objectivity in a nurturing practicep. 165
The controversy over the named person in the 2003 Mental Health (Care and Treatment) (Scotland) Actp. 167
The controversy over the make-up of mental health tribunal panelsp. 169
Independent advocacy and the concept of a clean practicep. 170
Retaining a concept of genuine authority in psychiatryp. 174
Conclusionsp. 176
Project summaryp. 176
Conclusions for psychiatryp. 179
Reforming psychiatric judgementp. 179
Rehabilitation of the public health function of psychiatryp. 180
Widening the practice spacep. 182
Objectivity in psychiatry requires categorisation of psychiatristsp. 183
Patients become the authoritative authors of their life's narrative: the authoritative narrative paradigmp. 184
Conclusions for psychotherapyp. 185
Further projectsp. 190
Notesp. 197
Bibliographyp. 205
Indexp. 215
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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