Catalogue


America's ranking among nations : a global perspective of the United States in graphic detail /
Michael D. Dulberger.
imprint
Lanham, Md. : Bernan Press, c2013.
description
xii, 201 p. : col. ill. ; 28 cm.
ISBN
1598886037 (pbk), 9781598886030 (pbk)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Lanham, Md. : Bernan Press, c2013.
isbn
1598886037 (pbk)
9781598886030 (pbk)
contents note
U.S. demographics in relation to the world -- U.S. demographics -- U.S. education in relation to the world -- U.S. education -- The U.S. economy in relation to the world -- U.S. economy -- The U.S. role in international trade -- U.S. employment in relation to the world -- U.S. employment -- U.S. energy in relation to the world -- U.S. energy -- U.S. health in relation to the world -- U.S. innovation in relation to the world -- U.S. national defense in relation to the world.
catalogue key
8944615
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Introduction or Preface
America's Ranking Among Nations A Global Perspective of the United States in Graphic Detail We've all heard the expression: You are entitled to your own opinions but not your own facts. Have you ever considered exactly how you learn the "facts"? In recent years, there has been a great deal of public discourse and shouting about America's decline in everything from economic, military, and environmental matters to the collapse of the American family unit, while the world changes around us at accelerating speed. We read about China's incredible economic growth, the European debt crisis, the Arab Awakening and the increasing polarization between wealthy and poor in America. To grasp the essence of these changes, and to judge their implications, it is essential that we first acquire a broad foundation of knowledge obtained from unbiased sources. With a strong foundation we become more capable of assimilating new information, assessing both its credibility and relevance, from which we can build our own points of view. This book was created to spare the reader the effort of seeking out and vetting validated informational resources and to provide key metrics, in graphic format, about the United States and how the United States compares with other nations. All the information presented includes the attributed sources to enable verification or augmentation of the data. The author's objective is to deliver maximum knowledge with minimum effort on the part of the reader. Unlike most books written on social-economic-global matters, this book presents facts without opinions, enabling the reader to literally see the United States' ranking vis-á-vis all the world's nations. The data used to create the charts have been distilled from extensive data sources to focus on comparing the U.S. against the most economically powerful countries and also against those countries that are in the top ten position-regardless of economic status. Many of the charts extend over a 5060 year period making trends visually obvious and easy for the reader to extrapolate as he/she chooses. Collectively these charts provide a compendium of revealing information about America's position among the world's nations, presented in a nonsensational, objective manner. Most people rely on the news media to stay informed about national and global events; however consider for a moment the news reporters' information sources. Those sources are often political leaders who have their own agenda and provide only supporting facts. It's not that the information is wrong but rather that it is selective. It is also unusual to receive a broad perspective on a topic from the media, which focuses on immediate issues rather than providing educational background data. Despite these informational handicaps, each of us has somehow created opinions on most topics, since our brains are trained to force-fit information we receive into the framework of our existing beliefs. These beliefs tend to become reinforced with time since we subconsciously filter new information to fit our established thought paradigms. Many of our "facts" may actually be dogma, so entrenched in our thinking that we are not even aware that we lack objectivity. We often develop personal positions on important issues without a solid foundation of supporting information. If asked to explain our views we most likely repeat political party rhetoric we've become comfortable with and have learned to align with. The critical criteria in determining the value of any informational resource are its pedigree, i.e., how reliable the source is, and the ease with which one can extract the specific information being sought. There are many organizations and individuals providing "facts" so one must view all sources with healthy skepticism. Ulterior motives are sometimes obvious (please donate to …) but some are more insidious, designed to influence public opinion as do many politically motivated websites and blogs. The late-night comedy shows you watch may have more influence on your attitudes about current events through their subliminal messages than your favorite newspapers. Fortunately, establishing a credible information baseline is much easier to achieve today than it would have been just a decade ago, thanks to universal access to high-speed Internet and hundreds of public databases now available just keystrokes away to anyone who takes the time to seek them out. You can now access thousands of characteristics about the residents and government of virtually any of the 193 sovereign nations on the planet. You can compare military manpower, obesity prevalence, infant mortality, national debt, crude oil imports, and even the number of cell phone subscriptions. Many databases extend back in time 50 years or more, and when graphically displayed can help you develop your own sense of change and what it portends for the future. It may not surprise you to learn that the United States Census Bureau publishes massive amounts of data, but did you know they publish international data, as does the Federal Reserve, Internal Revenue Service, United States Department of Energy, Congressional Budget Office, Bureau of Economic Analysis, Energy Information Administration and many other government agencies. Even the Central Intelligence Agency publishes extensive volumes comparing all the world's countries, and the results are readily available to the general public. In addition to the U.S. government resources there are also highly credible international organizations with accessible databases, including The World Bank, the World Health Organization and the United Nations, to name a few. (See Appendix V for the complete listing of information resources used in creating this book.) Ironically, a major digital-information age dilemma has become the overabundance of information. It's like having a fire hose when you only need a sip of water. Just try googling "U.S. ranking in the world for …." (fill in the blanks) and you'll find millions of results! This book will enable you to see for yourself America's standing relative to other nations in each of hundreds of metrics. The author is confident you will readily learn facts that will stimulate your thinking and may change the lens through which you view the world, regardless of your political persuasion. Perhaps you may even change some of your opinions! The more people in our democratic republic are exposed to global reality checks, the better will be the solutions debated around the family room and in the halls of Congress. The author is also confident that when you finish this book you'll return to it, again and again, as a refresher of the facts.
Introduction or Preface
America's Ranking Among NationsA Global Perspective of the United States in Graphic DetailWe've all heard the expression: You are entitled to your own opinions but not your own facts. Have you ever considered exactly how you learn the facts? In recent years, there has been a great deal of public discourse and shouting about America's decline in everything from economic, military, and environmental matters to the collapse of the American family unit, while the world changes around us at accelerating speed. We read about China's incredible economic growth, the European debt crisis, the Arab Awakening and the increasing polarization between wealthy and poor in America. To grasp the essence of these changes, and to judge their implications, it is essential that we first acquire a broad foundation of knowledge obtained from unbiased sources. With a strong foundation we become more capable of assimilating new information, assessing both its credibility and relevance, from which we can build our own points of view.This book was created to spare the reader the effort of seeking out and vetting validated informational resources and to provide key metrics, in graphic format, about the United States and how the United States compares with other nations. All the information presented includes the attributed sources to enable verification or augmentation of the data. The author''s objective is to deliver maximum knowledge with minimum effort on the part of the reader. Unlike most books written on social-economic-global matters, this book presents facts without opinions, enabling the reader to literally see the United States' ranking vis-á-vis all the world's nations. The data used to create the charts have been distilled from extensive data sources to focus on comparing the U.S. against the most economically powerful countries and also against those countries that are in the top ten position-regardless of economic status. Many of the charts extend over a 5060 year period making trends visually obvious and easy for the reader to extrapolate as he/she chooses. Collectively these charts provide a compendium of revealing information about America's position among the world's nations, presented in a nonsensational, objective manner. Most people rely on the news media to stay informed about national and global events; however consider for a moment the news reporters' information sources. Those sources are often political leaders who have their own agenda and provide only supporting facts. It's not that the information is wrong but rather that it is selective. It is also unusual to receive a broad perspective on a topic from the media, which focuses on immediate issues rather than providing educational background data. Despite these informational handicaps, each of us has somehow created opinions on most topics, since our brains are trained to force-fit information we receive into the framework of our existing beliefs. These beliefs tend to become reinforced with time since we subconsciously filter new information to fit our established thought paradigms. Many of our facts may actually be dogma, so entrenched in our thinking that we are not even aware that we lack objectivity. We often develop personal positions on important issues without a solid foundation of supporting information. If asked to explain our views we most likely repeat political party rhetoric we've become comfortable with and have learned to align with. The critical criteria in determining the value of any informational resource are its pedigree, i.e., how reliable the source is, and the ease with which one can extract the specific information being sought. There are many organizations and individuals providing facts so one must view all sources with healthy skepticism. Ulterior motives are sometimes obvious (please donate to …) but some are more insidious, designed to influence public opinion as do many politically motivated websites and blogs. The late-night comedy shows you watch may have more influence on your attitudes about current events through their subliminal messages than your favorite newspapers. Fortunately, establishing a credible information baseline is much easier to achieve today than it would have been just a decade ago, thanks to universal access to high-speed Internet and hundreds of public databases now available just keystrokes away to anyone who takes the time to seek them out.You can now access thousands of characteristics about the residents and government of virtually any of the 193 sovereign nations on the planet. You can compare military manpower, obesity prevalence, infant mortality, national debt, crude oil imports, and even the number of cell phone subscriptions. Many databases extend back in time 50 years or more, and when graphically displayed can help you develop your own sense of change and what it portends for the future.It may not surprise you to learn that the United States Census Bureau publishes massive amounts of data, but did you know they publish international data, as does the Federal Reserve, Internal Revenue Service, United States Department of Energy, Congressional Budget Office, Bureau of Economic Analysis, Energy Information Administration and many other government agencies. Even the Central Intelligence Agency publishes extensive volumes comparing all the world's countries, and the results are readily available to the general public. In addition to the U.S. government resources there are also highly credible international organizations with accessible databases, including The World Bank, the World Health Organization and the United Nations, to name a few. (See Appendix V for the complete listing of information resourcesused in creating this book.)Ironically, a major digital-information age dilemma has become the overabundance of information. It's like having a fire hose when you only need a sip of water. Just try googling U.S. ranking in the world for …. (fill in the blanks) and you'll find millions of results!This book will enable you to see for yourself America's standing relative to other nations in each of hundreds of metrics. The author is confident you will readily learn facts that will stimulate your thinking and may change the lens through which you view the world, regardless of your political persuasion. Perhaps you may even change some of your opinions! The more people in our democratic republic are exposed to global reality checks, the better will be the solutions debated around the family room and in the halls of Congress. The author is also confident that when you finish this book you'll return to it, again and again, as a refresher of the facts.
Introduction or Preface
America''s Ranking Among NationsA Global Perspective of the United States in Graphic DetailWe''ve all heard the expression: You are entitled to your own opinions but not your own facts. Have you ever considered exactly how you learn the "facts"? In recent years, there has been a great deal of public discourse and shouting about America''s decline in everything from economic, military, and environmental matters to the collapse of the American family unit, while the world changes around us at accelerating speed. We read about China''s incredible economic growth, the European debt crisis, the Arab Awakening and the increasing polarization between wealthy and poor in America. To grasp the essence of these changes, and to judge their implications, it is essential that we first acquire a broad foundation of knowledge obtained from unbiased sources. With a strong foundation we become more capable of assimilating new information, assessing both its credibility and relevance, from which we can build our own points of view.This book was created to spare the reader the effort of seeking out and vetting validated informational resources and to provide key metrics, in graphic format, about the United States and how the United States compares with other nations. All the information presented includes the attributed sources to enable verification or augmentation of the data. The author''s objective is to deliver maximum knowledge with minimum effort on the part of the reader. Unlike most books written on social-economic-global matters, this book presents facts without opinions, enabling the reader to literally see the United States'' ranking vis--vis all the world''s nations. The data used to create the charts have been distilled from extensive data sources to focus on comparing the U.S. against the most economically powerful countries and also against those countries that are in the top ten position--regardless of economic status. Many of the charts extend over a 50-60 year period making trends visually obvious and easy for the reader to extrapolate as he/she chooses. Collectively these charts provide a compendium of revealing information about America''s position among the world''s nations, presented in a nonsensational, objective manner. Most people rely on the news media to stay informed about national and global events; however consider for a moment the news reporters'' information sources. Those sources are often political leaders who have their own agenda and provide only supporting facts. It''s not that the information is wrong but rather that it is selective. It is also unusual to receive a broad perspective on a topic from the media, which focuses on immediate issues rather than providing educational background data. Despite these informational handicaps, each of us has somehow created opinions on most topics, since our brains are trained to force-fit information we receive into the framework of our existing beliefs. These beliefs tend to become reinforced with time since we subconsciously filter new information to fit our established thought paradigms. Many of our "facts" may actually be dogma, so entrenched in our thinking that we are not even aware that we lack objectivity. We often develop personal positions on important issues without a solid foundation of supporting information. If asked to explain our views we most likely repeat political party rhetoric we''ve become comfortable with and have learned to align with. The critical criteria in determining the value of any informational resource are its pedigree, i.e., how reliable the source is, and the ease with which one can extract the specific information being sought. There are many organizations and individuals providing "facts" so one must view all sources with healthy skepticism. Ulterior motives are sometimes obvious (please donate to ...) but some are more insidious, designed to influence public opinion as do many politically motivated websites and blogs. The late-night comedy shows you watch may have more influence on your attitudes about current events through their subliminal messages than your favorite newspapers. Fortunately, establishing a credible information baseline is much easier to achieve today than it would have been just a decade ago, thanks to universal access to high-speed Internet and hundreds of public databases now available just keystrokes away to anyone who takes the time to seek them out.You can now access thousands of characteristics about the residents and government of virtually any of the 193 sovereign nations on the planet. You can compare military manpower, obesity prevalence, infant mortality, national debt, crude oil imports, and even the number of cell phone subscriptions. Many databases extend back in time 50 years or more, and when graphically displayed can help you develop your own sense of change and what it portends for the future.It may not surprise you to learn that the United States Census Bureau publishes massive amounts of data, but did you know they publish international data, as does the Federal Reserve, Internal Revenue Service, United States Department of Energy, Congressional Budget Office, Bureau of Economic Analysis, Energy Information Administration and many other government agencies. Even the Central Intelligence Agency publishes extensive volumes comparing all the world''s countries, and the results are readily available to the general public. In addition to the U.S. government resources there are also highly credible international organizations with accessible databases, including The World Bank, the World Health Organization and the United Nations, to name a few. (See Appendix V for the complete listing of information resourcesused in creating this book.)Ironically, a major digital-information age dilemma has become the overabundance of information. It''s like having a fire hose when you only need a sip of water. Just try googling "U.S. ranking in the world for ...." (fill in the blanks) and you''ll find millions of results!This book will enable you to see for yourself America''s standing relative to other nations in each of hundreds of metrics. The author is confident you will readily learn facts that will stimulate your thinking and may change the lens through which you view the world, regardless of your political persuasion. Perhaps you may even change some of your opinions! The more people in our democratic republic are exposed to global reality checks, the better will be the solutions debated around the family room and in the halls of Congress. The author is also confident that when you finish this book you''ll return to it, again and again, as a refresher of the facts.
First Chapter
America's Ranking Among NationsA Global Perspective of the United States in Graphic DetailWe've all heard the expression: You are entitled to your own opinions but not your own facts. Have you ever considered exactly how you learn the "facts"? In recent years, there has been a great deal of public discourse and shouting about America's decline in everything from economic, military, and environmental matters to the collapse of the American family unit, while the world changes around us at accelerating speed. We read about China's incredible economic growth, the European debt crisis, the Arab Awakening and the increasing polarization between wealthy and poor in America. To grasp the essence of these changes, and to judge their implications, it is essential that we first acquire a broad foundation of knowledge obtained from unbiased sources. With a strong foundation we become more capable of assimilating new information, assessing both its credibility and relevance, from which we can build our own points of view.This book was created to spare the reader the effort of seeking out and vetting validated informational resources and to provide key metrics, in graphic format, about the United States and how the United States compares with other nations. All the information presented includes the attributed sources to enable verification or augmentation of the data. The author's objective is to deliver maximum knowledge with minimum effort on the part of the reader. Unlike most books written on social-economic-global matters, this book presents facts without opinions, enabling the reader to literally see the United States' ranking vis--vis all the world's nations. The data used to create the charts have been distilled from extensive data sources to focus on comparing the U.S. against the most economically powerful countries and also against those countries that are in the top ten position--regardless of economic status. Many of the charts extend over a 50-60 year period making trends visually obvious and easy for the reader to extrapolate as he/she chooses. Collectively these charts provide a compendium of revealing information about America's position among the world's nations, presented in a nonsensational, objective manner. Most people rely on the news media to stay informed about national and global events; however consider for a moment the news reporters' information sources. Those sources are often political leaders who have their own agenda and provide only supporting facts. It's not that the information is wrong but rather that it is selective. It is also unusual to receive a broad perspective on a topic from the media, which focuses on immediate issues rather than providing educational background data. Despite these informational handicaps, each of us has somehow created opinions on most topics, since our brains are trained to force-fit information we receive into the framework of our existing beliefs. These beliefs tend to become reinforced with time since we subconsciously filter new information to fit our established thought paradigms. Many of our "facts" may actually be dogma, so entrenched in our thinking that we are not even aware that we lack objectivity. We often develop personal positions on important issues without a solid foundation of supporting information. If asked to explain our views we most likely repeat political party rhetoric we've become comfortable with and have learned to align with. The critical criteria in determining the value of any informational resource are its pedigree, i.e., how reliable the source is, and the ease with which one can extract the specific information being sought. There are many organizations and individuals providing "facts" so one must view all sources with healthy skepticism. Ulterior motives are sometimes obvious (please donate to ...) but some are more insidious, designed to influence public opinion as do many politically motivated websites and blogs. The late-night comedy shows you watch may have more influence on your attitudes about current events through their subliminal messages than your favorite newspapers. Fortunately, establishing a credible information baseline is much easier to achieve today than it would have been just a decade ago, thanks to universal access to high-speed Internet and hundreds of public databases now available just keystrokes away to anyone who takes the time to seek them out.You can now access thousands of characteristics about the residents and government of virtually any of the 193 sovereign nations on the planet. You can compare military manpower, obesity prevalence, infant mortality, national debt, crude oil imports, and even the number of cell phone subscriptions. Many databases extend back in time 50 years or more, and when graphically displayed can help you develop your own sense of change and what it portends for the future.It may not surprise you to learn that the United States Census Bureau publishes massive amounts of data, but did you know they publish international data, as does the Federal Reserve, Internal Revenue Service, United States Department of Energy, Congressional Budget Office, Bureau of Economic Analysis, Energy Information Administration and many other government agencies. Even the Central Intelligence Agency publishes extensive volumes comparing all the world's countries, and the results are readily available to the general public. In addition to the U.S. government resources there are also highly credible international organizations with accessible databases, including The World Bank, the World Health Organization and the United Nations, to name a few. (See Appendix V for the complete listing of information resourcesused in creating this book.)Ironically, a major digital-information age dilemma has become the overabundance of information. It's like having a fire hose when you only need a sip of water. Just try googling "U.S. ranking in the world for ...." (fill in the blanks) and you'll find millions of results!This book will enable you to see for yourself America's standing relative to other nations in each of hundreds of metrics. The author is confident you will readily learn facts that will stimulate your thinking and may change the lens through which you view the world, regardless of your political persuasion. Perhaps you may even change some of your opinions! The more people in our democratic republic are exposed to global reality checks, the better will be the solutions debated around the family room and in the halls of Congress. The author is also confident that when you finish this book you'll return to it, again and again, as a refresher of the facts.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Library Journal on 2013-05-01:
This work is a compendium of graphic displays showing the standing of the United States in comparison to other countries in categories ranging from economic, educational, and environmental matters to health and national defense. Approximately 180 column, line, pie, bar, and scatter charts explore an array of broad topics such as birth rates, religious identification, household income, trade balance, energy consumption, and military expenditures. All of the charts are colorful, easy to read, and informative. Each page contains an almost full-page chart or graph, a brief explication of its data, the origin of the information, and a link to the data's source. The chapter on United States innovation in relation to the world has some particularly interesting graphs, including ones on cell phone subscriptions and Internet use. The work concludes with a resource page of web addresses and a very useful index. Because of its limited number of topics, those engaging in serious research will not find this title comprehensive enough to meet their needs. However, Dulberger successfully achieves his objective of creating a single volume of metrics with appeal to users with broad interest in global affairs. -VERDICT An eye-catching book that provides valuable comparative data for readers with general interest in international topics rather than a work of in-depth scholarship.-Rob Tench, Perry Lib., Old Dominion Univ. (c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Appeared in Choice on 2013-08-01:
Rankings of various kinds often are needed to answer reference queries. America's Ranking among Nations consists of 14 chapters on topics such as demographics, education, the economy, international trade, employment, energy, health, innovation, and national defense. Each chapter has a one-page narrative overview and colorful, full-page graphic displays. Each chart includes the source for the data and the website address of the originating organization. The sources are authoritative and credible. They include the Bureau of Labor Statistics (CH, Sup'97, 34SUP-102), the CIA's The World Factbook (CH, Dec'09, 47-1794), the U.S. Census Bureau (CH, Feb'12, 49-3060), and the World Health Organization (CH, Mar'04, 41-4081). Significant shortcomings, however, limit the book's usefulness. The information provided is several years old, since statistics are not always gathered continuously by the organizations and time lags occur between data collection and publication. Another deficiency is the limited range of statistics, e.g., chapter 4, on education, lists only nine tables; and chapter 5, on the economy, lists only seven tables. Information in the appendixes has little value, consisting of lists of the members of the G20, European Union, OECD, and OPEC, along with one page of resources. A better source for users seeking information about the United States and other countries is CountryWatch (CountryWatch Premium, CH, Mar'13, 50-3623), which is available online and which offers superior country information and graphical displays. Summing Up: Not recommended. C. E. Geck independent scholar
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Highly recommended, especially for public and college library reference shelves."
This item was reviewed in:
Library Journal, May 2013
Choice, August 2013
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Long Description
America's Ranking Among Nations is a compendium of graphic displays revealing America's position among the world's nations, on a wide array of topics ranging from economic, military and environmental matters to family unit demographics. Each page provides a foundation of attributed facts, presented in a graphic, objective manner, derived from public databases published by U.S. federal agencies and reputable international sources. This book will appeal to a very broad readership at all levels within academia as well as with the informed general public. The contents encompass world and U.S. current affairs, economics, energy, education and demographics, to create a convenient reference for all of these areas of study. Anyone who wants to hone his/her global perspective of the U.S., on matters ranging from math literacy of high school students, infant mortality, national debt, crude oil imports and even the number of cell phone subscriptions, will benefit. It delivers maximum knowledge with minimum effort on the part of the reader. Readers will learn facts to stimulate their thinking which may change the lens through which they view the world.

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