Catalogue


Lessons from Fort Apache : beyond language endangerment and maintenance /
M. Eleanor Nevins.
imprint
Chichester, West Sussex : Wiley-Blackwell 2013, c2013
description
x, 265 p. : ill. ; 26 cm
ISBN
1118424239 (cloth : alk. paper), 9781118424230 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Chichester, West Sussex : Wiley-Blackwell 2013, c2013
isbn
1118424239 (cloth : alk. paper)
9781118424230 (cloth : alk. paper)
catalogue key
8941393
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
M. Eleanor Nevins is Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Middlebury College, Vermont, USA. A specialist in linguistic and cultural anthropology, her work addresses the interplay of language, education, religion, globalization, and indigenous communities. An accomplished scholar of Western Apache poetics and rhetoric, Nevins teaches courses in linguistic and cultural anthropology, ethnography, and Native American literatures. Her work has appeared in a number of edited volumes as well as in the journals Language in Society, Language and Communication, Heritage Management, and Journal of Linguistic Anthropology.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"In Lessons from Fort Apache , Eleanor Nevins provides an eye-opening map of the ideologically complex, often densely tangled contact zone that language maintenance projects inevitably inhabit and charts in eloquent, persuasive terms a politically symmetrical path toward language sustainability." Richard Bauman, Indiana University, Bloomington "In Lessons from Fort Apache , Nevins provides vividly instructive portrayals of the ideological struggles of language revitalization efforts. She teaches us to attain new understandings of the hidden complexity of these important intra- and intercultural projects." Paul V. Kroskrity, University of California, Los Angeles
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Summaries
Back Cover Copy
Lessons from Fort Apache is an ethnography of indigenous language dynamics on the Fort Apache reservation in North America with implications for global concerns over language endangerment. Moving beyond a narrow focus on linguistic documentation, the author examines the ways in which the linguistic and cultural identities of indigenous populations are attributed with meaning against yet other sociocultural concerns and interests. While affirming the value of language documentation and maintenance, Nevins also provides a much-needed appraisal of the potential conflicts in authority claims and language practices bet The author argues that the debates surrounding the revitalization of indigenous languages need broadening to include larger questions of social mediation, shifting cultural identities, and evaluation of the politics intrinsic to the relationship between indigenous community members and university-accredited experts like language researchers and educators. This engaging ethnography examines these questions, and investigates the language dynamics of the Fort Apache Reservation, including unintended challenges that standardized textual models can sometimes pose to local interests. Nevins reveals the community's historical and contemporary concerns for language documentation, maintenance, and revitalization. Her text provides perceptive commentary on the need for language maintenance programs and for flexibility in finding politically sustainable forms of collaboration and exchange between researchers, teachers, and those community members who base their claims to an indigenous language in alternate terms.
Back Cover Copy
This study deploys detailed analysis of the language dynamics in the Fort Apache indigenous community in North America to explore deepening global concerns over diminishing linguistic heritages. Moving beyond a narrow focus on linguistic documentation, the author examines the ways in which the linguistic and cultural identities of indigenous populations are attributed with meaning against yet other socio-cultural concerns and interests. While affirming the value of language documentation and maintenance, Nevins also provides a much-needed appraisal of the potential conflicts in authority claims and language practices between community members and the educators and scholars who research their linguistic heritage. The author argues that the debates surrounding the revitalization of indigenous languages need broadening to include larger questions of social mediation, shifting cultural identities, and evaluation of the politics intrinsic to the relationship between indigenous community members and university accredited experts like language researchers and educators. This engaging ethnography examines these questions, and investigates the language dynamics of the Fort Apache Reservation and the unintended challenges that standardized textual models can sometimes pose to local interests. Nevins reveals the community's historical and contemporary concerns for language documentation, maintenance and revitalization. Her text provides perceptive commentary on the need for language maintenance programs and for flexibility in finding politically sustainable forms of collaboration and exchange between researchers, teachers and those community members whose claim to authority in an indigenous languages are cast in alternate terms.
Back Cover Copy
This study deploys detailed analysis of the language dynamics in the Fort Apache indigenous community in North America to explore deepening global concerns over diminishing linguistic heritages. Moving beyond a narrow focus on linguistic documentation, the author examines the ways in which the linguistic and cultural identities of indigenous populations are subsumed by larger socio-cultural groupings and interests. Nevins provides a much-needed appraisal of the potential conflicts between community members and the educators and scholars who research their unique linguistic heritage. The author believes that the debates surrounding the revitalization of indigenous languages need broadening to include larger questions of social mediation, shifting cultural identities, and evaluation of the low levels of participation among indigenous people in language programs. This engaging ethnography examines these questions, and investigates the language dynamics of the Fort Apache Reservation and the particular effects of the dominant non-indigenous textual models that are inimical to their local interests. Nevins reveals the community's historical and contemporary concerns for language documentation, maintenance and revitalization. Her text provides perceptive commentary on the need for language maintenance programs and for flexibility in the face of evolving indigenous languages that reflect wider-scale cultural influences.
Bowker Data Service Summary
This incisive ethnographic analysis of indigenous language documentation, maintenance, and revitalisation focuses on linguistic heritage issues on the Native American reservation at Fort Apache and explores the broader social, political and religious influences on changing language practices in indigenous communities.
Main Description
This incisive ethnographic analysis of indigenous language documentation, maintenance, and revitalization focuses on linguistic heritage issues on the Native American reservation at Fort Apache and explores the broader social, political and religious influences on changing language practices in indigenous communities. Offers a focused ethnographic analysis of an indigenous community that also explores global issues of language endangerment and maintenance and their socio-historical contexts Addresses the complexities and conflicts in language documentation and revitalization programs, and how they articulate with localized discourse genres, education practices, religious beliefs, and politics Examines differing evaluations of language loss, and maintenance, among members of affected communities, and their creative responses to challenges posed by encompassing socio-cultural regimes, including university accredited language experts Provides an ethnographic analysis of speech in indigenous communities that moves beyond narrowly conceived language documentation to consider changing linguistic and social identities
Main Description
This incisive ethnographic analysis of indigenous language endangerment, maintenance, and revitalization focuses on the linguistic heritage of the Native American reservation at Fort Apache and explores the broader social, political and religious influences on evolving languages in native communities. Offers a focused ethnographic analysis of an indigenous community that also explores global issues of language endangerment and maintenance and their socio-historical contexts Addresses the complexities and conflicts in language maintenance and revitalization programs, and how they are influenced by localized dialects, education systems, religious beliefs, and politics Examines differing evaluations of language loss, and maintenance, among members of affected communities, and the challenges of adapting to wider socio-cultural influences Provides an ethnographic analysis of speech in indigenous communities that moves beyond narrowly conceived language documentation to consider evolving linguistic and social identities
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. viii
Introductionp. 1
Indigenous Languages and the Mediation of Communitiesp. 12
Learning to Listen: Corning to Terms with Conflicting Meanings of Language Lossp. 47
They Live in Lonesome Dove: English in Indigenous Placesp. 79
Stories in the Moment of Encounter: Documentation Boundary Workp. 113
What No Coyote Story Means: The Borderland Genre of Traditional Storytellingp. 152
"Some 'No No' and Some 'Yes'": Silence, Agency, and Traditionalist Wordsp. 186
Sustainability: Possible Socialities of Documentation and Maintenancep. 215
Lawrence Mithlop. 229
Eva Lupe on Her Early Lifep. 237
Indexp. 250
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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