Catalogue


Parliament in British politics /
Philip Norton.
edition
2nd edition.
imprint
Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire : Palgrave Macmillan, 2013, c2013
description
xiv, 336 p.
ISBN
0230291937 (pbk.), 9780230291935 (pbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire : Palgrave Macmillan, 2013, c2013
isbn
0230291937 (pbk.)
9780230291935 (pbk.)
contents note
Machine generated contents note: -- Parliament in Perspective -- The Development of Parliament -- PART I: PARLIAMENT AND GOVERNMENT -- Recruiting Ministers -- The Making of Public Policy -- Legislation -- The Administration of Government -- PART II: BEYOND WHITEHALL -- Parliament and the European Union -- Parliament and Devolution -- Parliament and the Courts -- PART III: PARLIAMENT AND THE PEOPLE -- Representing the People -- The Voice of the Constituents -- Speaking for Different Interests -- Reaching the Public -- Conclusion: Parliamentary Reform.
abstract
"This fully revised new edition includes expanded coverage of Parliament's relationship with the courts, devolved assemblies and the European Union. Distinctively, the book goes beyond the usual focus of Parliament-Government relations to encompass policy-makers beyond Whitehall and Parliament's broader relationship with citizens"--
catalogue key
8941328
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 299-321).
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Philip Norton is Professor of Government and Director of the Centre for Legislative Studies, University of Hull, UK, and, as Lord Norton of Louth, has been a member of the House of Lords since 1998.
Reviews
Review Quotes
'This is the single best book published on the Westminster Parliament: admirably clear, superbly researched, and brilliantly argued.' - Philip Cowley, University of Nottingham, UK.
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Philip Norton is a leading academic and parliamentarian. In this major work, he revisits the central question of his highly acclaimed earlier work 'Does Parliament Matter', in relation to its role in governance, and its relationship to the average British 'subject'.
Description for Bookstore
Written by a leading authority in the field, this is a fully revised and updated introduction to Parliament and its place in British politics
Main Description
The second edition of this popular text provides an authoritative and comprehensive assessment of Parliament's role in contemporary British politics. Distinctively, the book goes beyond the usual focus of Parliament-Government relations to encompass policy-makers beyond Whitehall and ParliamentÆs relationship with citizens. The first part of the book explores Parliament relations with Government û from its function as a recruiting ground to its powers to constrain and check the executive. The author examines how Parliament has adapted to change to its competencies by assessing its relationship with the European Union, devolved assemblies and the courts. He also assess to what extent Parliament constitutes a focal point for the expression of different view in society and identifies ways in which it can be strengthened as the pivotal link between citizen and Government. The new edition has been fully revised and updated to show how Parliament has adapted to recent developments, including internal parliamentary reform and changes to the constitutional landscape following the Treaty of Lisbon. Written by a leading authority, also a parliamentarian himself, this book is essential reading for anyone wanting to understand ParliamentÆs role in contemporary Britain. Book jacket.
Main Description
This fully revised new edition includes expanded coverage of Parliament's relationship with the courts, devolved assemblies and the European Union. Distinctively, the book goes beyond the usual focus of Parliament-Government relations to encompass policy-makers beyond Whitehall and Parliament's broader relationship with citizens.
Main Description
Written by a leading authority in the field, this is a fully revised and updated introduction to Parliament and its place in British politics This fully revised new edition includes expanded coverage of Parliament's relationship with the courts, devolved assemblies and the European Union. Distinctively, the book goes beyond the usual focus of Parliament-Government relations to encompass policy-makers beyond Whitehall and Parliament's broader relationship with citizens.
Main Description
Written by a leading authority in the field, this is a fully revised and updated introduction to Parliament and its place in British politicsThis fully revised new edition includes expanded coverage of Parliament's relationship with the courts, devolved assemblies and the European Union. Distinctively, the book goes beyond the usual focus of Parliament-Government relations to encompass policy-makers beyond Whitehall and Parliament's broader relationship with citizens.
Table of Contents
List of Figures and Tablesp. x
Prefacep. xii
Parliament in Perspectivep. 1
The Decline of Legislaturesp. 2
The Paradox of Legislaturesp. 4
The Power of Legislaturesp. 5
The Functions of Legislaturesp. 7
Explaining Parliament in Britainp. 12
Parliament and governmentp. 12
Beyond Whitehallp. 13
Parliament and citizenp. 14
The issue of reformp. 14
The Development of Parliamentp. 16
The House of Commonsp. 17
Originsp. 17
Early functionsp. 18
Sixteenth to eighteenth centuriesp. 19
The nineteenth centuryp. 20
The twentieth centuryp. 22
Recent changesp. 23
The House of Lordsp. 36
Reform: powersp. 37
Reform: compositionp. 38
The changing nature of the Housep. 40
The Changing Constitutional Environmentp. 45
Conclusionp. 46
Parliament and Government
Recruiting Ministersp. 51
Ministers in Parliamentp. 51
The Shift to the Commonsp. 52
Growth in Numbersp. 54
Consequences for Ministersp. 55
Ministerial recruitmentp. 55
A training groundp. 58
Wider consequencesp. 60
Parliamentp. 61
Career attractivenessp. 61
Stability in membershipp. 62
Proximity to ministersp. 62
Socializationp. 63
Governmentp. 64
Controlp. 64
Ministerial selectionp. 65
Legitimationp. 66
Conclusionp. 67
The Making of Public Policyp. 69
The Policy-Making Processp. 70
Initiationp. 72
Formulationp. 75
The Impact of Parliament: Decision-Makingp. 77
Agenda settingp. 77
Initiating legislationp. 78
Pre-legislative scrutinyp. 82
The Impact of Parliament: Anticipated Reactionp. 84
The Impact of Parliament: Institutional Constraintsp. 86
Conclusionp. 87
Legislationp. 89
Legislative Processp. 89
The House of Commonsp. 89
House of Lordsp. 94
Private members' billsp. 96
Private legislationp. 97
Secondary legislationp. 98
Post-legislative scrutinyp. 100
The Effect of Parliament?p. 101
Saying no to governmentp. 101
Persuading the governmentp. 105
Institutional constraintsp. 108
Conclusionp. 109
The Administration of Governmentp. 111
Inside the Chamberp. 111
Debates in the Commonsp. 111
Debates in the Lordsp. 119
Question Timep. 121
Outside the Chamberp. 126
Select committeesp. 126
House of Lordsp. 134
Back-bench and all-party groupsp. 136
Meetings and correspondencep. 138
Impact?p. 139
Limitationsp. 139
Strengthsp. 142
Conclusionp. 147
Beyond Whitehall
Parliament and the European Unionp. 151
Membershipp. 152
The House of Commonsp. 153
European Scrutiny Committeep. 153
European committeesp. 155
Floor of the Housep. 156
Select committeesp. 157
The House of Lordsp. 157
The European Union Committeep. 157
The floor of the Housep. 160
External Linksp. 160
Lisbon Treaty and the Yellow Card Procedurep. 161
Parliamentary Adaptationp. 162
Conclusionp. 165
Parliament and Devolutionp. 167
Whitehall and Westminsterp. 169
Scrutinyp. 171
Inter-Parliamentary Contactp. 174
Parliamentary Adaptationp. 175
Internal challengesp. 176
The West Lothian Questionp. 177
Conclusionp. 180
Parliament and the Courtsp. 182
Human Rights Actp. 184
The Joint Committee on Human Rightsp. 187
Parliamentary Adaptationp. 192
Conclusionp. 194
Parliament and Citizen
Representing the Peoplep. 199
Acting on Behalf of Some Individual or Groupp. 200
Freely Electedp. 206
Socially Typicalp. 211
Symbolicp. 215
The Challenge to Legitimacyp. 216
The Voice of Constituentsp. 219
The Changing Nature of Constituency Demandsp. 219
MPs' Responsivenessp. 224
Effectsp. 227
Governmentp. 227
MPsp. 228
Constituentsp. 233
Conclusionp. 237
Speaking for Different Interestsp. 240
The Role of Partyp. 240
The Impact of Groupsp. 243
Explanations of Changep. 246
Interest groupsp. 246
Governmentp. 250
Parliamentp. 251
Consequencesp. 253
Benefitsp. 253
Limitationsp. 256
Conclusionp. 259
Reaching the Publicp. 263
Lack of Contactp. 264
Developing Linksp. 265
More opennessp. 265
Specializationp. 268
Use of the Internetp. 269
Consequencesp. 273
The positive impactp. 273
Limitationsp. 275
Conclusionp. 278
The Reform of Parliamentp. 280
Explaining Reformp. 281
Reforming the Commonsp. 283
Reforming the Lordsp. 285
Reforming Parliamentp. 288
Conclusionp. 294
Further Readingp. 295
Bibliographyp. 299
Indexp. 323
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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