Catalogue


Tears of repentance : Christian indian identity and community in colonial southern New England /
Julius H. Rubin.
imprint
Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, [2013], c2013
description
xiii, 405 p.
ISBN
0803243553 (cloth : alk. paper), 9780803243552 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, [2013], c2013
isbn
0803243553 (cloth : alk. paper)
9780803243552 (cloth : alk. paper)
catalogue key
8941326
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 357-381) and index.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This title offers new ways of examining how native groups and individuals recast Protestant theology to restore their native communities and cultures.
Main Description
Tears of Repentance revisits and re-examines the familiar stories of intercultural encounters between Protestant missionaries and Native peoples in southern New England from the seventeenth to the early nineteenth centuries. Focusing on Protestant missionaries' accounts of their ideals, purposes, and goals among the Native communities they served and of the religion as lived, experienced, and practiced among Christianized Indians, Julius H. Rubin offers a new way of understanding the motives and motivations of those who lived in New England's early Christianized Indian village communities. Rubin explores how Christian Indians recast Protestant theology into an Indianized quest for salvation from their worldly troubles and toward the promise of an otherworldly paradise. The Great Awakening of the eighteenth century reveals how evangelical pietism transformed religious identities and communities and gave rise to the sublime hope that New Born Indians were children of God who might effectively contest colonialism. With this dream unfulfilled, the exodus from New England to Brothertown envisioned a separatist Christian Indian commonwealth on the borderlands of America after the Revolution. Tears of Repentance is an important contribution to American colonial and Native American history, offering new ways of examining how Native groups and individuals recast Protestant theology to restore their Native communities and cultures.
Main Description
Tears of Repentance revisits and reexamines the familiar stories of intercultural encounters between Protestant missionaries and Native peoples in southern New England from the seventeenth to the early nineteenth centuries. Focusing on Protestant missionaries' accounts of their ideals, purposes, and goals among the Native communities they served and of the religion as lived, experienced, and practiced among Christianized Indians, Julius H. Rubin offers a new way of understanding the motives and motivations of those who lived in New England's early Christianized Indian village communities. Rubin explores how Christian Indians recast Protestant theology into an Indianized quest for salvation from their worldly troubles and toward the promise of an otherworldly paradise. The Great Awakening of the eighteenth century reveals how evangelical pietism transformed religious identities and communities and gave rise to the sublime hope that New Born Indians were children of God who might effectively contest colonialism. With this dream unfulfilled, the exodus from New England to Brothertown envisioned a separatist Christian Indian commonwealth on the borderlands of America after the Revolution. Tears of Repentance is an important contribution to American colonial and Native American history, offering new ways of examining how Native groups and individuals recast Protestant theology to restore their Native communities and cultures.
Table of Contents
List of Tablesp. vii
Prefacep. ix
Introductionp. 1
Praying Towns and Praying-to-God Indiansp. 19
The Penitential Sense of Lifep. 39
The Pattern of Religious Paternalism in Eighteenth-Century Christian Indian Communitiesp. 77
Samson Occom and Evangelical Christian Indian Identityp. 114
The Stockbridge and New Jersey Brotherton Tribesp. 160
The Moravian Missions to Shekomeko and Pachgatgochp. 197
Errand into the Borderlandsp. 138
Frontier Rendezvousp. 269
Conclusionp. 303
Religion and Red Powerp. 309
A Note on Indiantownsp. 313
Notesp. 315
Bibliographyp. 357
Indexp. 383
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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