Catalogue


The Plan de San Diego : Tejano rebellion, Mexican intrigue /
Charles H. Harris III and Louis R. Sadler.
imprint
Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, [2013], c2013
description
xvi, 338 p. : ill., maps ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0803264771 (pbk. : alk. paper), 9780803264779 (pbk. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
series title
imprint
Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, [2013], c2013
isbn
0803264771 (pbk. : alk. paper)
9780803264779 (pbk. : alk. paper)
catalogue key
8929122
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 313-320) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Charles H. Harris III and Louis R. Sadler are both professors emeritus of history at New Mexico State University. They are authors of numerous books, including coauthorship of The Texas Rangers and the Mexican Revolution: The Bloodiest Decade, 1910-1920 and The Secret War in El Paso: Mexican Revolutionary Intrigue, 1906-1920.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This title argues that the insurrection in Texas was made possible by support from Mexico when it suited President Carranza for his own political and diplomatic purposes.
Main Description
The Plan of San Diego, a rebellion proposed in 1915 to overthrow the U.S. government in the Southwest and establish a Hispanic republic in its stead, remains one of the most tantalizing documents of the Mexican Revolution. The plan called for an insurrection of Mexicans, Mexican Americans, and African Americans in support of the Mexican Revolution and the waging of a genocidal war against Anglos. The resulting violence approached a race war and has usually been portrayed as a Hispanic struggle for liberation brutally crushed by the Texas Rangers, among others. The Plan de San Diego: Tejano Rebellion, Mexican Intrigue , based on newly available archival documents, is a revisionist interpretation focusing on both south Texas and Mexico. Charles H. Harris III and Louis R. Sadler argue convincingly that the insurrection in Texas was made possible by support from Mexico when it suited the regime of President Venustiano Carranza, who co-opted and manipulated the plan and its supporters for his own political and diplomatic purposes in support of the Mexican Revolution. The study examines the papers of Augustine Garza, a leading promoter of the plan, as well as recently released and hitherto unexamined archival material from the Federal Bureau of Investigation documenting the day-to-day events of the conflict.
Main Description
The Plan of San Diego, a rebellion proposed in 1915 to overthrow the U.S. government in the Southwest and establish a Hispanic republic in its stead, remains one of the most tantalizing documents of the Mexican Revolution. The plan called for an insurrection of Mexicans, Mexican Americans, and African Americans in support of the Mexican Revolution and the waging of a genocidal war against Anglos. The resulting violence approached a race war and has usually been portrayed as a Hispanic struggle for liberation brutally crushed by the Texas Rangers, among others. The Plan de San Diego: Tejano Rebellion, Mexican Intrigue , based on newly available archival documents, is a revisionist interpretation focusing on both south Texas and Mexico. Charles H. Harris III and Louis R. Sadler argue convincingly that the insurrection in Texas was made possible by support from Mexico when it suited the regime of President Venustiano Carranza, who co-opted and manipulated the plan and its supporters for his own political and diplomatic purposes in support of the Mexican Revolution. The study examines the papers of Augustín Garza, a leading promoter of the plan, as well as recently released and hitherto unexamined archival material from the Federal Bureau of Investigation documenting the day-to-day events of the conflict.
Main Description
The Plan of San Diego, a rebellion proposed in 1915 to overthrow the U.S. government in the Southwest and establish a Hispanic republic in its stead, remains one of the most tantalizing documents of the Mexican Revolution. The plan called for an insurrection of Mexicans, Mexican Americans, and African Americans in support of the Mexican Revolution and the waging of a genocidal war against Anglos. The resulting violence approached a race war and has usually been portrayed as a Hispanic struggle for liberation brutally crushed by the Texas Rangers, among others. The Plan de San Diego: Tejano Rebellion, Mexican Intrigue , based on newly available archival documents, is a revisionist interpretation focusing on both south Texas and Mexico. Charles H. Harris III and Louis R. Sadler argue convincingly that the insurrection in Texas was made possible by support from Mexico when it suited the regime of President Venustiano Carranza, who co-opted and manipulated the plan and its supporters for his own political and diplomatic purposes in support of the Mexican Revolution. The study examines the papers of Augustn Garza, a leading promoter of the plan, as well as recently released and hitherto unexamined archival material from the Federal Bureau of Investigation documenting the day-to-day events of the conflict.
Main Description
The Plan of San Diego, a rebellion proposed in 1915 to overthrow the U.S. government in the Southwest and establish a Hispanic republic in its stead, remains one of the most tantalizing documents of the Mexican Revolution. The plan called for an insurrection of Mexicans, Mexican Americans, and African Americans in support of the Mexican Revolution and the waging of a genocidal war against Anglos. The resulting violence approached a race war and has usually been portrayed as a Hispanic struggle for liberation brutally crushed by the Texas Rangers, among others. The Plan de San Diego: Tejano Rebellion, Mexican Intrigue, based on newly available archival documents, is a revisionist interpretation focusing on both south Texas and Mexico. Charles H. Harris III and Louis R. Sadler argue convincingly that the insurrection in Texas was made possible by support from Mexico when it suited the regime of President Venustiano Carranza, who co-opted and manipulated the plan and its supporters for his own political and diplomatic purposes in support of the Mexican Revolution. The study examines the papers of Augustín Garza, a leading promoter of the plan, as well as recently released and hitherto unexamined archival material from the Federal Bureau of Investigation documenting the day-to-day events of the conflict.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. viii
Prefacep. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xiii
The Plan de San Diegop. 1
The Plan Surfacesp. 6
The Magonistasp. 21
The Mexican Connectionp. 26
The "Bandit War" Beginsp. 33
The "Bandit War" Intensifiesp. 49
The "Bandit War" Peaksp. 72
The "Bandit War" Winds Downp. 84
The Plan de San Diego Collapsesp. 102
Intelligence Gatheringp. 112
The Plan de San Diego, Phase Twop. 117
An Improbable Operationp. 130
The Morín Affairp. 140
The Bureau Investigatesp. 156
New Raidsp. 167
The War Crisisp. 181
Aftermathp. 199
Informantsp. 205
Further Investigationp. 214
Later Careersp. 224
A Question of Numbersp. 243
Some Interesting Interpretationsp. 253
Conclusionp. 259
Notesp. 265
Bibliographyp. 313
Indexp. 321
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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