Catalogue


The flames of war : the fight for Upper Canada, July--December 1813 /
Richard Feltoe.
imprint
Toronto : Dundurn Press, c2013.
description
168 p. : ill., maps ; 21 cm.
ISBN
1459707028, 9781459707023
format(s)
Book
Holdings
Subjects
geographic term
More Details
series author
imprint
Toronto : Dundurn Press, c2013.
isbn
1459707028
9781459707023
catalogue key
8923560
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
Issued also in electronic formats.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Richard Feltoe was born in Newcastle-upon-Tyne and holds a degree in economics from the University of London. He is the curator, and corporate archivist for the Redpath Sugar Museum and is active as a living history reenactor-re-creating the life of a Canadian militia soldier from the War of 1812. His other publications include Redcoated Ploughboys and The Call to Arms. He lives in Brampton, Ontario.
Reviews
Review Quotes
This volume, as the others published in the series, is effectively illustrated with numerous reproductions of historic etchings and paintings alongside contemporary photographs of artifacts and locations, as well as maps detailing battles and tracing troop movements.
This volume, as the others published in the series, is effectively illustrated with numerous reproductions of historic etchings and paintings alongside contemporary photographs of artifacts and locations, as well as maps detailing battles and tracing troop movements. -- OHS Bulletin, 20130801
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
In April 1813 the Americans launched a new campaign to conquer Upper Canada, after their failure to do so in 1812. However, following initial victories, the US assault stalled as a combined force of British regulars, Canadian militia, and Native allies counterattacked, throwing the Americans entirely onto the defensive by the end of June. During the next six months, this seesaw of military advantage was repeated again and again as each side escalated its commitment of men and resources and fought to gain the 'final' victory.
Main Description
In April 1813, the Americans launched a new campaign to conquer Upper Canada after their failure to do so in 1812. However, following initial victories, the U.S. assault stalled as a combined force of British regulars, Canadian militia, and Native allies counterattacked, throwing the Americans entirely onto the defensive by the end of June. During the next six months, this seesaw of military advantage was repeated again and again as each side escalated its commitment of men and resources and fought to gain the "final" victory. Unfortunately, this also brought with it an increasing level of destruction and hardship suffered by armies and civilian populations on both sides of the border. Numerous images of locations at the time are counterpointed with modern pictures take from the same perspective to give a true then-and-now effect. Maps are also included to trace the course of individual battles stage by stage, while placing and moving the shifting formations of troops across a geographically accurate battlefield.
Main Description
In April 1813 the Americans launched a new campaign to conquer Upper Canada, after their failure to do so in 1812. However, following initial victories, the U.S. assault stalled as a combined force of British regulars, Canadian militia, and Native allies counterattacked, throwing the Americans entirely onto the defensive by the end of June. During the next six months, this seesaw of military advantage was repeated again and again as each side escalated its commitment of men and resources and fought to gain the "final" victory. Unfortunately, this also brought with it an increasing level of destruction and hardship suffered by armies and civilian populations on both sides of the border. Numerous images of locations at the time are counterpointed with modern pictures taken from the same perspective to give a true then-and-now effect. Maps are also included to trace the course of individual battles stage by stage, while placing and moving the shifting formations of troops across a geographically accurate battlefield.
Main Description
In April 1813 the Americans launched a new campaign to conquer Upper Canada, after their failure to do so in 1812. However, following initial victories, the U.S. assault stalled as a combined force of British regulars, Canadian militia, and Native allies counterattacked, throwing the Americans entirely onto the defensive by the end of June. During the next six months, this seesaw of military advantage was repeated again and again as each side escalated its commitment of men and resources and fought to gain the "final" victory. Unfortunately, this also brought with it an increasing level of destruction and hardship suffered by armies and civilian populations on both sides of the border.Numerous images of locations at the time are counterpointed with modern pictures taken from the same perspective to give a true then-and-now effect. Maps are also included to trace the course of individual battles stage by stage, while placing and moving the shifting formations of troops across a geographically accurate battlefield.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgementsp. 9
Prefacep. 11
Introduction: Timeline of Eventsp. 15
Striking While the Iron Is Hot: The Niagara Frontier, July-August 1813 The Battle of Black Rock, July 11, 1813p. 20
Going from Bad to Worse: The Detroit Frontier, July-August 1813p. 37
Move and Counter Move: August-September 1813p. 46
The Vice Begins to Tighten: The Detroit Frontier, September 1813p. 49
The Vice Closesp. 55
A Crushing Defeat: The Battle of the Thames (Moravianstown), October 5, 1813p. 63
Hard Choicesp. 75
Seesaw on the Niagara: October-December 1813p. 78
The St. Lawrence Campaign: September-November 1813p. 89
The Battle of Crysler's Farm: November 11, 1813p. 102
A New Broom: The Assault on Fort Niagara, December 18/19, 1813p. 129
Flames Along the Border: The Niagara Frontier, December 1813p. 138
Cold Steel and Hot Fire: The Assault on Black Rock and Buffalo, December 29, 1813p. 142
Notesp. 156
Selected Bibliographyp. 160
Indexp. 165
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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