Catalogue

COVID-19: Updates on library services and operations.

Insular Christianity : alternative models of the Church in Britain and Ireland, c.1570-c.1700 /
edited by Robert Armstrong and Tadhg Ó Hannracháin.
imprint
Manchester : Manchester University Press, 2013.
description
x, 278 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0719086981 (hardback), 9780719086984 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Manchester : Manchester University Press, 2013.
isbn
0719086981 (hardback)
9780719086984 (hardback)
catalogue key
8921092
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Robert Armstrong is Associate Professor of History, Trinity College Dublin Tadhg hAnnrachin is Senior Lecturer in the School of History and Archives at University College Dublin
Summaries
Long Description
This focused collection of essays offers a dynamic new perspective on the evolution of post-reformation religious communities within Britain and Ireland. It presents a host of unique insights into alternative models of the church across the entire archipelago by providing a wide-ranging comparison of two communions, Presbyterianism and Catholicism. Both religions aspired to the formation of national communities of belief but, periodically or permanently, adapted to the disempowered position of dissident or proscribed faiths. Deriving from the Insular Christianity project in Dublin, the book combines essays by some of the leading scholars in the field with work by up-and-coming researchers. The contributions range from synoptic essays which fill gaps in the existing historiography to tightly coherent research essays that break new ground with regard to a series of central institutional and intellectual issues and problems, including the role of the laity in sustaining extra-legal confessions, the complexities of toleration and the claim to churchly status, and the roles of intellectuals in forging the self-understanding of faith communities.This is a book which all serious students of the religious history of early modern Britain and Ireland should read. It will also appeal to those interested in the national histories of England, Ireland and Scotland who wish to learn how developments within the archipelago as a whole inflected the religious development of their own societies.
Main Description
This collection of essays on the alternative establishments which both Presbyterians and Catholics attempted to create in Britain and Ireland offers a dynamic new perspective on the evolution of post-reformation religious communities. Deriving from the Insular Christianity project in Dublin, the book combines essays by some of the leading scholars in the field with work by brilliant and upcoming researchers. The contributions, all of which were commissioned, range from synoptic essays which fill in gaps in the existing historiography to tightly coherent research essays that break new ground with regard to a series of central institutional and intellectual issues and problems.This is a book which will appeal to all those interested in the religious history of early modern Britain and Ireland.
Table of Contents
List of Contributorsp. vii
Acknowledgementsp. ix
List of Abbreviationsp. x
Alternative establishments? Insular Catholicism and Presbyterianismp. 1
'Replant the uprooted trunk of the tree of faith': the Society of Jesus and the continental colleges for religious exilesp. 28
'Genevan Jesuits': crypto-Presbyterianism in England'p. 49
Riots, rescues and 'grene bowes': Catholics and protest in Ireland, 1570-1640p. 67
Authority, agency and the reception of the Scottish National Covenant of 1638p. 88
The influence of the Irish Catholic clergy in shaping the religious and political allegiances of Irish Catholics, 1603-41p. 107
Politics and religion in the Westminster assembly and the 'grand debate'p. 129
Coping with alternatives: religious liberty in royalist thought 1642-47p. 149
'The remembrance of sweet fellowship': relationships between English and Scottish Presbyterians in the 1640s and 1650sp. 170
An alternative establishment: the evolution of the Irish Catholic hierarchy, 1600-49p. 190
The Irish alternative: Scottish and English Presbyterianism in Irelandp. 207
The laity and the structure of the Catholic Church in early modern Scotlandp. 231
Between Reformation and Enlightenment: Presbyterian clergy, religious liberty and intellectual changep. 252
Indexp. 272
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem