Catalogue


An incurable past : Nasser's Egypt then and now /
Mériam N. Belli.
imprint
Gainesville : University Press of Florida, c2013.
description
xii, 295 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0813044049 (alk. paper), 9780813044040 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Gainesville : University Press of Florida, c2013.
isbn
0813044049 (alk. paper)
9780813044040 (alk. paper)
contents note
Introduction: This incurable otherness -- Part 1. Retelling Salah al-Din : The Future is Everything. Farouk is gone, long live the revolution ; The new order -- Part 2. Burn, Edmund, Burn : The Present is Everything. When Edmund Allenby became al-Limby ; Port Said, martyr city ; The end of history -- Part 3. St. Mary, Mother of Egypt : The Past is Everything. The science of miracles ; Globalizing the virgin, nationalizing religion -- Conclusion: "What revolution?!".
abstract
A look at the interplay between human experience and its cultural representations in mid-twentieth-century Egypt.
catalogue key
8917261
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [265]-284) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Mriam N. Belli is assistant professor of history at the University of Iowa.
Summaries
Library of Congress Summary
A look at the interplay between human experience and its cultural representations in mid-twentieth-century Egypt.
Main Description
Examining history not as it was recorded but as it is remembered, An Incurable Past contextualizes the classist and deeply disappointing post-Nasserist period that has inspired todayÆs Egyptian revolutionaries. Public performances, songs, stories, oral histories, and everyday speech reveal not just the history of mid-twentieth-century Egypt but also the ways in which ordinary people experience and remember the past. Constructing a ground-breaking theoretical framework, Mériam Belli demonstrates the fragility of the "collectivity" and the urgent need to replace the current method for studying collective memory with a new approach she defines as "historical utterances." Contextual and relational, these links between intimate and public historical narratives are an integral part of a society's dialogue about its past, present, and future. Three major vernacular expressions constitute the historical utterances that illuminate the Nasserite experience and its present. The first is universal schooling and education. The second is anti-colonial struggle, as exemplified by Port Said's effigy burning festival. The third is the public's responses to the "miraculous millenarian" apparition of the Virgin Mary. Using an extensive array of sources, ranging from official archives and press reportage to fiction, public rituals, and oral interviews, Belli offers findings that penetrate issues of class, religion, and social and political activism. She shows that personal testimonies and public representations allow us a deep understanding of Egypt's construction of the modern in its many sociocultural layers. Book jacket.
Description for Bookstore
"Spanning virtually the entire twentieth century and as timely as the outbreak of the 2011 'January Revolution,' this work has much to say about where Egypt has been, who Egyptians are and, ultimately, where they may take their country."-Joel Gordon, author of Nasser: Hero of the Arab Nation "A truly extraordinary accomplishment that is thought-provoking, creative, and inspiring. Belli is the first in Middle Eastern studies to examine the cultural history of twentieth- century Egypt through the interactions between education and remembrance."-Israel Gershoni, Tel Aviv University "Makes an outstanding contribution to our understandings of Egyptian national identity and memory."-Nancy L. Stockdale, University of North Texas Mid-century Egypt seems to shift its shape in light of ordinary peoples' memories. In An Incurable Past , Mériam Belli examines collective memory, oral histories, and everyday communications to reveal not just the history of mid-twentieth-century Egypt but also the ways in which ordinary people experience and remember the past. Using official archives, government publications, press reportage, fiction, textbooks, cinema, art, and public rituals, Belli constructs a ground-breaking theoretical framework of "historical utterances" which provokes questions about the relationship between remembrance and reality. Belli argues that such personal testimonies and public representations allow us a deeper understanding of Egypt's many sociocultural layers in the 1950s and 1960s. Shespotlights three topics of vernacular expression in modern Egypt: education, the anti-colonial Limby Festival, and the 1968 apparition of the Virgin Mary at a Coptic Orthodox Church in Cairo. Linked by the mid-century shift from communal life to an industrial and individuated society, these expressions also disclose the contradictory influence of ideologically homogenizing state policies. Examining history not as it was but as it is remembered, this book contextualizes the classist and deeply disappointing post-Nasserist period that has inspired today's Egyptian revolutionaries. Mériam N. Belli is assistant professor of history at the University of Iowa.
Table of Contents
List of Figuresp. viii
List of Tablesp. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Introduction: This Incurable Othernessp. 1
Retelling Salah al-Din: The Future Is Everythingp. 15
Farouk Is Gone, Long Live the Revolutionp. 19
The New Orderp. 49
Burn, Edmund, Burn: The Present Is Everythingp. 75
When Edmund Allenby Became al-Limbyp. 85
Port Said, Martyr Cityp. 105
The End of Historyp. 136
St. Mary, Mother of Egypt: The Past Is Everythingp. 163
The Science of Miraclesp. 167
Globalizing the Virgin, Nationalizing Religionp. 192
Conclusion: "What Revolution?!"p. 216
List of Abbreviationsp. 225
Notesp. 227
Bibliographyp. 265
Indexp. 285
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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