Catalogue


The city staged : Jacobean comedy, 1603-1613 /
Theodore B. Leinwand.
imprint
Madison, Wis. : University of Wisconsin Press, 1986.
description
viii, 233 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0299106705 :
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Madison, Wis. : University of Wisconsin Press, 1986.
isbn
0299106705 :
general note
Includes index.
catalogue key
891686
 
Bibliography: p. 219-230.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1986-12:
In this excellent study, Leinwand examines the plays of Thomas Middleton, George Chapman, John Webster and others. His purposes are to define the complex contemporary social relations between stage and art, and to describe the way Londoners perceived themselves both on stage and in the city. The attitudes and attributes of various London types-the citizen, his wife, his daughter, his apprentices, the citizen merchant, the gentleman-gallant, the chaste maid, the independent woman, the whore, and others. The author is concerned about how realistic the stage portrayals were and how they were received by the audiences. Comparison to the images presented by other means, such as sermons, pamphlets, poems, satires, and conduct books, help to give the stage version definition. Central to his study is Leinwand's view that Jacobean city comedy was shaped by the city and in turn critiqued the world it reflected. Leinwand's study is more than an examination of one decade in the early 17th century; he clearly articulates his concept of the complex relationship between art and society. Useful for any serious student of English literature, life, or theater.-C.C. Harbour, University of Montevallo
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, December 1986
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Summaries
Main Description
In this highly original and energetic study, Theodore B. Leinwand views Jacobean theater-particularly Jacobean city comedy-as a measure of the way Londoners of the time perceived each other. In forming a sophisticated view of the relations between Jacobean comedy and life, Leinwand makes a solid contribution not only to Jacobean theater, but, more broadly, to our understanding of the cultural, social, and political contexts within which all literature is produced. Central to Leinwand's thesis is the belief that Jacobean theater was shaped by the city, and that in turn the theater both crystallized and criticized the attitudes of city dwellers for city dwellers. While The City Staged is an important study in its central focus, it becomes especially valuable when seen as a well-defined laboratory in which the vexing relationship between art and society may be studied.
Main Description
In this highly original and energetic study, Theodore B. Leinwand views Jacobean theater-particularly Jacobean city comedy-as a measure of the way Londoners of the time perceived each other. In forming a sophisticated view of the relations between Jacobean comedy and life, Leinwand makes a solid contribution not only to Jacobean theater, but, more broadly, to our understanding of the cultural, social, and political contexts within which all literature is produced. Central to Leinwand’s thesis is the belief that Jacobean theater was shaped by the city, and that in turn the theater both crystallized and criticized the attitudes of city dwellers for city dwellers. While The City Staged is an important study in its central focus, it becomes especially valuable when seen as a well-defined laboratory in which the vexing relationship between art and society may be studied.

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