Catalogue


The children of Henry VIII /
John Guy.
edition
First edition.
imprint
Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2013, c2013
description
xv, 258 pages, 8 pages of colour unnumbered plates : illustrations, colour portraits ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0192840908 (hbk.), 9780192840905 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2013, c2013
isbn
0192840908 (hbk.)
9780192840905 (hbk.)
catalogue key
8916532
 
Includes bibliographical references (pages 205-235) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Library Journal on 2013-04-15:
Tudor historian Guy (fellow, Clare Coll., Univ. of Cambridge; My Heart Is My Own: The Life of Mary Queen of Scots) turns his attention to the heirs of Henry VIII in this succinct examination of their lives. Rather than attempt the massive undertaking of covering in depth the histories of Edward, Mary, and Elizabeth, Guy has chosen to give the most salient details regarding the monarchs, thus allowing himself to present an overall picture of their lives and upbringings under Henry's rule and during their later reigns. His particular focus is on how their relationships with each other-and the long shadow of their father-affected them. Of note is the author's inclusion of the brief life of Henry VIII's best-known illegitimate child, Henry Fitzroy, a potential heir to the throne before his untimely death at age 17. VERDICT Guy's research is sound and his facts are presented in a clear and entertaining style, which makes this a good volume for students and general readers new to Tudor history. However, its brevity and lack of fresh information and analysis mean that those already familiar with the essentials of the Tudor dynasty will likely find little to hold their interest.-Kathleen McCallister, Univ. of South Carolina (c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
Review Quotes
[A] smart, lively little book enriched by the reliable pleasure of Guy's prose, his pen dancing as deftly about his compact historical portraits as Horenbout's brush once did over his stunning miniatures.
Guy, whose prose is commendably readable, has a real gift for bringing Tudor history to life for 21st-century readers...
"Henry VIII's succession problems are the canvas for this collective portraiture of his four children who lived long enough to become pawns in the family chess game... Marked by a mixture of real and feigned affections, the dynastic dynamics of Henry's heirs will drive Guy's fluidly styled work straight into the hands of even veteran Tudor readers." --Booklist
John Guy is that rare cross: a scholar who also writes for the popular market. It shows here, as he sketches with verve and fluency the education and the beliefs, as well as, briefly, the reigns of these last Tudors. But where he excels is in illuminating the relationships between the squabbling siblings. They say if you've got lemons, make lemonade, and in Guy's hands the story of The Children of Henry VIII is fresh, sparkling and sharp.
The stunning psychodrama that was the Tudor court is brilliantly evoked in John Guy's little book
This may be a well known story, but Guy presents it with typical narrative flair and attention to detail, producing a book with obvious appeal.
Well-written, well-researched and a lot of fun.
This item was reviewed in:
Library Journal, April 2013
Kirkus Reviews, June 2013
Booklist, July 2013
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Behind the facade of politics and pageantry at the Tudor court, there was a family drama. Nothing drove Henry VIII, England's wealthiest and most powerful king, more than producing a legitimate male heir. He married six wives and fathered four living children, each by a different mother. To tell their stories, John Guy returns to the archives, drawing on a vast array of contemporary records, personal letters, and first-hand accounts.
Long Description
Behind the façade of politics and pageantry at the Tudor court, there was a family drama.Nothing drove Henry VIII, England's wealthiest and most powerful king, more than producing a legitimate male heir and so perpetuating his dynasty. To that end, he married six wives, became the subject of the most notorious divorce case of the sixteenth century, and broke with the pope, all in an age of international competition and warfare, social unrest and growing religious intolerance and discord.Henry fathered four living children, each by a different mother. Their interrelationships were often scarred by jealously, mutual distrust, sibling rivalry, even hatred. Possessed of quick wits and strong wills, their characters were defined partly by the educations they received, and partly by events over which they had no control.Henry Fitzroy, Duke of Richmond, although recognized as the king's son, could never forget his illegitimacy. Edward died while still in his teens, desperately plotting to exclude his half-sisters from the throne. Mary's world was shattered by her mother's divorce and her own unhappy marriage. Elizabeth was the most successful, but also the luckiest. Even so, she lived with the knowledge that her father had ordered her mother's execution, was often in fear of her own life, and could never marrythe one man she truly loved.Henry's children idolized their father, even if they differed radically over how to perpetuate his legacy. To tell their stories, John Guy returns to the archives, drawing on a vast array of contemporary records, personal letters, and first-hand accounts.
Main Description
Behind the facade of politics and pageantry at the Tudor court, there was a family drama. Nothing drove Henry VIII, England's wealthiest and most powerful king, more than producing a legitimate male heir and so perpetuating his dynasty. To that end, he married six wives, became the subject of the most notorious divorce case of the sixteenth century, and broke with the pope, all in an age of international competition and warfare, social unrest and growing religious intolerance and discord. Henry fathered four living children, each by a different mother. Their interrelationships were often scarred by jealously, mutual distrust, sibling rivalry, even hatred. Possessed of quick wits and strong wills, their characters were defined partly by the educations they received, and partly by events over which they had no control. Henry Fitzroy, Duke of Richmond, although recognized as the king's son, could never forget his illegitimacy. Edward died while still in his teens, desperately plotting to exclude his half-sisters from the throne. Mary's world was shattered by her mother's divorce and her own unhappy marriage. Elizabeth was the most successful, but also the luckiest. Even so, she lived with the knowledge that her father had ordered her mother's execution, was often in fear of her own life, and could never marry the one man she truly loved. Henry's children idolized their father, even if they differed radically over how to perpetuate his legacy. To tell their stories, John Guy returns to the archives, drawing on a vast array of contemporary records, personal letters, and first-hand accounts.
Main Description
Behind the facade of politics and pageantry at the Tudor court, there was a family drama.Nothing drove Henry VIII, England's wealthiest and most powerful king, more than producing a legitimate male heir and so perpetuating his dynasty. To that end, he married six wives, became the subject of the most notorious divorce case of the sixteenth century, and broke with the pope, all in an ageof international competition and warfare, social unrest and growing religious intolerance and discord.Henry fathered four living children, each by a different mother. Their interrelationships were often scarred by jealously, mutual distrust, sibling rivalry, even hatred. Possessed of quick wits and strong wills, their characters were defined partly by the educations they received, and partly byevents over which they had no control.Henry Fitzroy, Duke of Richmond, although recognized as the king's son, could never forget his illegitimacy. Edward died while still in his teens, desperately plotting to exclude his half-sisters from the throne. Mary's world was shattered by her mother's divorce and her own unhappy marriage.Elizabeth was the most successful, but also the luckiest. Even so, she lived with the knowledge that her father had ordered her mother's execution, was often in fear of her own life, and could never marry the one man she truly loved.Henry's children idolized their father, even if they differed radically over how to perpetuate his legacy. To tell their stories, John Guy returns to the archives, drawing on a vast array of contemporary records, personal letters, and first-hand accounts.
Main Description
Nothing consumed Henry VIII, England's wealthiest and most powerful king, more than his desire to produce a legitimate male heir and perpetuate the Tudor dynasty. To that end he married six wives, became the subject of the most notorious divorce case of the sixteenth century, and broke with the pope, all in an age of international competition and warfare, social unrest, and growing religious intolerance and discord. Henry fathered four children who survived childhood, each by a different mother. InThe Children of Henry VIII,renowned Tudor historian John Guy tells their stories, returning to the archives and drawing on a vast array of contemporary records, personal letters, ambassadors' reports, and other eyewitness accounts, including the four children's own handwritten letters. Guy's compelling narrative illuminates their personalities, depicting siblings often scarred by jealously, mutual distrust, bitter rivalry, even hatred. Possessed of quick wits and strong wills, their characters were defined partly by the educations they received, and partly by events over which they had no control. Henry Fitzroy, Duke of Richmond, although recognized as the king's son, could never forget his illegitimacy. Edward would succeed his father, but died while still in his teens, desperately plotting to exclude his half-sisters from the throne, and utterly failing to do so. Mary's world was shattered by her mother Catherine of Aragon's divorce and her own unhappy marriage. Elizabeth was the most successful, but also the luckiest. Even so, she lived with the knowledge that her father had ordered her mother Anne Boleyn's execution, was often in fear of her own life, and could never marry the one man she truly loved. John Guy takes us behind the façade of politics and pageantry at the Tudor court, vividly capturing the greatest and most momentous family drama in all of English history.
Main Description
Nothing consumed Henry VIII, Englands wealthiest and most powerful king, more than his desire to produce a legitimate male heir and perpetuate the Tudor dynasty. To that end he married six wives, became the subject of the most notorious divorce case of the sixteenth century, and broke with the pope, all in an age of international competition and warfare, social unrest, and growing religious intolerance and discord. Henry fathered four children who survived childhood, each by a different mother. In The Children of Henry VIII, renowned Tudor historian John Guy tells their stories, returning to the archives and drawing on a vast array of contemporary records, personal letters, ambassadors reports, and other eyewitness accounts, including the four childrens own handwritten letters. Guys compelling narrative illuminates their personalities, depicting siblings often scarred by jealously, mutual distrust, bitter rivalry, even hatred. Possessed of quick wits and strong wills, their characters were defined partly by the educations they received, and partly by events over which they had no control. Henry Fitzroy, Duke of Richmond, although recognized as the kings son, could never forget his illegitimacy. Edward would succeed his father, but died while still in his teens, desperately plotting to exclude his half-sisters from the throne, and utterly failing to do so. Marys world was shattered by her mother Catherine of Aragons divorce and her own unhappy marriage. Elizabeth was the most successful, but also the luckiest. Even so, she lived with the knowledge that her father had ordered her mother Anne Boleyns execution, was often in fear of her own life, and could never marry the one man she truly loved. John Guy takes us behind the facade of politics and pageantry at the Tudor court, vividly capturing the greatest and most momentous family drama in all of English history.
Main Description
Nothing drove Henry VIII, England's wealthiest and most powerful king, more than producing a legitimate male heir and so perpetuating his dynasty. To that end, he married six wives, became the subject of the most notorious divorce case of the sixteenth century, and broke with the pope, all in an age of international competition and warfare, social unrest and growing religious intolerance and discord.Henry fathered four living children, eachby a different mother. Their interrelationships were often scarred by jealously, mutual distrust, sibling rivalry, even hatred. Possessed of quick wits and strong wills, their characters were defined partly by the educations they received, and partly by events over which they had no control. To telltheir stories, John Guy returns to the archives, drawing on a vast array of contemporary records, personal letters, and first-hand accounts.
Main Description
The family drama of EnglandÆs wealthiest and most powerful king. A tale of jealousy, mutual distrust, and often bitter sibling rivalry, simmering beneath the magnificent pageantry and stormy politics of the Tudor court. Book jacket.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. xii
List of Colour Platesp. xiv
Note on Units of Currencyp. xv
Genealogical Tablesp. xvi
The Tudor Successionp. xvi
The Boleynsp. xvii
The Howardsp. xviii
Prologuep. 1
In the Beginningp. 12
Smoke and Mirrorsp. 30
Prince or Princess?p. 45
Sons and Loversp. 63
A Family Feudp. 81
Ruling from the Gravep. 102
Faith and Exclusionp. 124
Sisters, Rivals, Queensp. 150
Uncharted Watersp. 176
Abbreviations Used in the Referencesp. 199
Notes on Dates and Quotationsp. 204
Notes and Referencesp. 205
Illustration Creditsp. 236
Indexp. 241
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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