Catalogue


Colonial rule and social change in Korea, 1910-1945 /
edited by Hong Yung Lee, Yung Chool Ha, and Clark W. Sorensen.
imprint
Seattle : University of Washington Press, c2013.
description
xi, 379 p.
ISBN
0295992166 (pbk. : alk. paper), 9780295992167 (pbk. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Seattle : University of Washington Press, c2013.
isbn
0295992166 (pbk. : alk. paper)
9780295992167 (pbk. : alk. paper)
contents note
Introduction : a critique of colonial modernity / Hong Yung Lee -- Colonial rule and social change in Korea : the paradox of colonial control / Yong Chool Ha -- Politics of communication and the colonial public sphere in 1920s Korea / Yong-Jick Kim -- Expansion of elementary schooling under colonialism : top down or bottom up? / Seong-Cheol Oh and Ki-Seok Kim -- National identity and class interest in the peasant movements of the colonial period / Dong-No Ki -- The 1920 colonial reforms and the June 10 (1926) movement : a Korean search for ethnic space / Mark E. Caprio -- Japanese assimilation policy and thought conversion in colonial Korea / Keongil Kim -- Colonial modernity and the hegemony of the body politic in leprosy relief work / Keunsik Jung -- Colonial body and indigenous soul : religion as a contested terrain of culture / Kwang-Ok Kim -- The korean family in colonial space : caught between modernization and assimilation / Clark W. Sorensen.
general note
"A Center for Korea Studies publication."
catalogue key
8916451
 
Includes bibliographical references (pages 335-363) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Hong Yung Lee is professor of political science at the University of California, Berkeley. Yong-Chool Ha is the Korea Foundation Professor of Korean Social Science at the University of Washington. Clark W. Sorensen is chair of the Korean Studies Program at the University of Washington. The other contributors are Mark E. Caprio, Keunsik Jung, Dong-No Kim, Keongil Kim, Ki-seok Kim, Kwang-ok Kim, Yong-jick Kim and Seong-cheol Oh.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This title highlights the complex interaction between indigenous activity and colonial governance, emphasising how Japanese rule adapted to Korean and missionary initiatives, as well as how Koreans found space within the colonial system to show agency.
Main Description
Colonial Rule and Social Change in Korea 1910-1945 highlights the complex interaction between indigenous activity and colonial governance, emphasizing how Japanese rule adapted to Korean and missionary initiatives, as well as how Koreans found space within the colonial system to show agency. Topics covered range from economic development and national identity to education and family; from peasant uprisings and thought conversion to a comparison of missionary and colonial leprosariums. These various new assessments of Japan's colonial legacy may open up new and illuminating approaches to historical memory that will resonate not just in Korean studies, but in colonial and postcolonial studies in general, and will have implications for the future of regional politics in East Asia. Hong Yung Lee is the author of several texts including Politics of Chinese Cultural Revolution . Clark W. Sorensen is director of the Korean Studies Department at the University of Washington. He is the general editor for the Center for Korea Studies Publication Series and editor-in-chief of the Journal of Korean Studies . Yong-chool Ha is the Korea Foundation Professor of Korean Social Science at the University of Washington. He has edited or co-authored many books including New Perspectives on International Studies in Korea . The other contributors include Mark E. Caprio, Keunsik Jung, Dong-No Kim, Keong-Il Kim, Ki-seok Kim, Kim Kwang-ok, Yong-Jick Kim, Seong-cheol Oh, and Myoung-Kyu Park.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgementsp. ix
List of Illustrationsp. xii
Introduction: A Critique of "Colonial Modernity"p. 3
Colonial Rule and Social Change in Korea: The Paradox of Colonial Controlp. 39
Politics of Communication and the Colonial Public Sphere in 1920s Koreap. 76
Expansion of Elementary Schooling under Colonialism: Top Down or Bottom Up?p. 114
National Identity and Class Interest in the Peasant Movements of the Colonial Periodp. 140
The 1920 Colonial Reforms and the June 10 (1926) Movement: A Korean Search for Ethnic Spacep. 173
Japanese Assimilation Policy and Thought Conversion in Colonial Koreap. 206
"Colonial Modernity" and the Hegemony of the Body Politic in Leprosy Relief Workp. 234
Colonial Body and Indigenous Soul: Religion as a Contested Terrain of Culturep. 264
The Korean Family in Colonial Space-Caught between Modernization and Assimilationp. 314
Bibliographyp. 335
Contributorsp. 364
Indexp. 367
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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