Catalogue


Exporting empire : Africa, colonial officials and the construction of the British imperial state, c. 1900-1939 /
Christopher Prior.
imprint
Manchester ; New York : Manchester University Press, 2013.
description
xvii, 199 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0719083680 (hbk.), 9780719083686 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
series title
imprint
Manchester ; New York : Manchester University Press, 2013.
isbn
0719083680 (hbk.)
9780719083686 (hbk.)
catalogue key
8913692
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 174-194) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Christopher Prior is Lecturer in Twentieth Century History at the University of Southampton
Summaries
Main Description
For Africans, rank and file colonial officials were the most visible manifestation of British imperial power. But in spite of their importance in administering such vast imperial territories, the attitudes of officials who served between the end of the nineteenth century and the Second World War, as well as what shaped such attitudes, have yet to be examined in any systematic way.In this original and revisionist work, Prior draws upon an enormous array of private and official papers to address some key questions about the colonial services. How did officials' education and training affect the ways that they engaged with Africa? How did officials relate to one another? How did officials seek to understand Africa and Africans? How did they respond to infrastructural change? How did they deal with anti-colonial nationalism? This work will be of value to students and lecturers alike interested in British, imperial and African history.
Main Description
For Africans, rank and file colonial officials were the most visible manifestation of British imperial power. But in spite of their importance in administering such vast imperial territories, the attitudes of officials who served between the end of the nineteenth century and the Second World War, as well as what shaped such attitudes, have yet to be examined in any systematic way. In this original and revisionist work, Prior draws upon an enormous array of private and official papers to address some key questions about the colonial services. How did officials' education and training affect the ways that they engaged with Africa? How did officials relate to one another? How did officials seek to understand Africa and Africans? How did they respond to infrastructural change? How did they deal with anti-colonial nationalism? This work will be of value to students and lecturers alike interested in British, imperial and African history.
Long Description
For Africans, rank and file colonial officials - the 'men on the spot' - were the most visible manifestation of Britain's imperial presence on their continent. For Britons, over time officials came to be celebrated as exemplars of a noble commitment to altruistic overseas duty. But in spite of their importance in administering such vast imperial territories, the attitudes of officials who served between the end of the 'Scramble for Africa' and the Second World War, as well as what shaped such attitudes, have yet to be examined in any systematic manner. A great deal of research has been undertaken on the impact of empire upon British society; what is needed is an assessment of the extent to which any metropolitan ideas about empire were subsequently exported out to Africa via colonial administrators.In this original and revisionist work, Prior draws upon an enormous array of private and official papers to address some key questions about the colonial services. How did officials' education and training affect the ways that they engaged with Africa? How did officials relate to one another? How did officials seek to understand Africa and Africans? How did they respond to infrastructural change? How did they deal with anti-colonial nationalism? Besides providing a focused assessment of colonial officials' intellectual worldviews, Prior assesses the value of some of the latest theories of empire in furthering our understanding of colonial Africa, meaning this work will be of importance to students and lecturers alike interested in British, imperial and African history.
Bowker Data Service Summary
This title looks at the attitudes of colonial officials in Africa who served between the end of the 19th century and WWII, as well as what shaped such attitudes, including education and training, interrelationships, infrastructural change, and anti-colonial nationalism.
Table of Contents
List of illustrationsp. ix
Acknowledgementsp. xi
Abbreviationsp. xiii
General Editor's introductionp. xv
Introductionp. 1
The construction of a governing corpsp. 15
An imperial educationp. 35
Individualism, intrigue and esprit de corpsp. 63
Envisioning imperial authority: power, ritual and knowledgep. 95
Implementing colonial change: economics, infrastructure and educationp. 123
Managing social and political change: tradition, modernity and indirect rulep. 147
Conclusionp. 170
Bibliographyp. 174
Indexp. 195
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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