Catalogue


We need new names : a novel /
NoViolet Bulawayo.
edition
1st edition.
imprint
New York : Reagan Arthur Books, 2013.
description
296 p.; 22 cm.
ISBN
0316230812 (Cloth), 9780316230810, 9780316230810 (Cloth)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Reagan Arthur Books, 2013.
isbn
0316230812 (Cloth)
9780316230810
9780316230810 (Cloth)
catalogue key
8913661
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 2013-04-08:
The short story that was adapted to become the first chapter of this debut novel by current Stegner fellow Bulawayo won the Caine Prize in 2011, known as the African Booker. Indeed the first half of the book, which follows a group of destitute but fearless children in a ravaged, never-named African country, is a remarkable piece of literature. Ten-year-old Darling is Virgil, leading us through Paradise, the shantytown where she and her friends Bastard, Godknows, Sbho, and Stina live and play. "Before," they lived in real houses and went to school-that is, before the paramilitary policemen came and destroyed it all, before AIDS, before Darling's friend Chipo was impregnated by her own grandfather. Now they roam rich neighborhoods, stealing bull guavas and hiding in trees while gangs raid white homes. Darling and her friends invent new names for themselves from American TV and spent their time trying to get "rid of Chipo's stomach." Abruptly, Darling lands with her aunt in America, seen as an ugly place, and absorbs the worst of its culture-Internet porn, obscene consumerism, the depreciation of education. Darling may not be worse off, but her life has not improved in any meaningful way. When Bulawayo won the Caine Prize, she said, "I want to go and write from home. It's a place which inspires me. I don't feel inspired by America at all," and the chapters set outside of Africa make this abundantly clear. In this promising novel's early chapters, Bulawayo's use of English is disarmingly fresh, her arrangement of words startling. Agent: Jin Auh, the Wylie Agency. (June) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
Appeared in Library Journal on 2013-05-15:
Caine Prize-winning Bulawayo's debut novel opens in a Zimbabwean shantytown called Paradise, where life is a daily struggle for sustenance as the regime destroys homes and closes schools. As ten-year-old Darling and her friends roam the streets, turning their quest for food into a game, Darling makes wry observations about her country's social ills that belie her tender age. Given the opportunity to move to Michigan with her aunt Fostalina, Darling faces a different challenge: how to transition from abject poverty to ostentatious excess. With an acute sense of irony, she observes refrigerators stuffed with food even as the women diet rigorously to fit into Victoria's Secret underwear and the dog whose room is larger than most homes in Zimbabwe. In a poignant scene, Darling sniffs at a guava and is transported to her homeland. VERDICT As Bulawayo effortlessly captures the innate loneliness of those who trade the comfort of their own land for the opportunities of another, Darling emerges as the freshest voice yet to spring from the fertile imaginations of talented young writers like Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie and Dinaw Mengestu, who explore the African diaspora in America. [See Prepub Alert, 11/19/12.]-Sally Bissell, Lee Cty. Lib. Syst., Estero, FL (c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Publishers Weekly, April 2013
Booklist, May 2013
Library Journal, May 2013
Globe & Mail, June 2013
Kirkus Reviews, June 2013
New York Times Book Review, June 2013
New York Times Full Text Review, June 2013
The Australian, August 2013
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Darling is only 10 years old, and yet she must navigate a fragile and violent world. In Zimbabwe, Darling and her friends steal guavas, try to get the baby out of young Chipo's belly, and grasp at memories of Before. Before their homes were destroyed by paramilitary policemen, before the school closed, before the fathers left for dangerous jobs abroad. But Darling has a chance to escape: she has an aunt in America. She travels to this new land in search of America's famous abundance only to find that her options as an immigrant are perilously few. NoViolet Bulawayo's debut calls to mind the great storytellers of displacement and arrival who have come before her--from Zadie Smith to Monica Ali to J.M. Coetzee--while she tells a vivid, raw story all her own.
Description for Library
The publishers big spring debut-after its big fall debut, Kevin Powerss The Yellow Birds, a National Book Award winner, so pay attention-vivifies ten-year-old Darlings journey from Zimbabwe to America. Surviving by stealing guavas with her friends and recalling Before, when their fathers hadnt left for jobs abroad after the paramilitary police destroyed their homes, Darling grasps at a chance to go live in America with an aunt. Its not the promised land she had hoped. Caine Literary Prize winner Bulawayos book is being snatched up worldwide.
Main Description
An exciting literary debut: the unflinching and powerful story of a young girl's journey out of Zimbabwe and to America. Darling is only ten years old, and yet she must navigate a fragile and violent world. In Zimbabwe, Darling and her friends steal guavas, try to get the baby out of young Chipo's belly, and grasp at memories of Before. Before their homes were destroyed by paramilitary policemen, before the school closed, before the fathers left for dangerous jobs abroad. But Darling has a chance to escape: she has an aunt in America. She travels to this new land in search of America's famous abundance only to find that her options as an immigrant are perilously few. NoViolet Bulawayo's debut calls to mind the great storytellers of displacement and arrival who have come before her-from Junot Diaz to Zadie Smith to J.M. Coetzee-while she tells a vivid, raw story all her own.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem