Catalogue


A tale for the time being /
Ruth Ozeki.
imprint
New York : Viking, 2013.
description
420 p. : ill ; 24 cm.
ISBN
9780670026630 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Viking, 2013.
isbn
9780670026630 (hardback)
abstract
"A time being is someone who lives in time, and that means you, and me, and every one of us who is, or was, or ever will be." In Tokyo, sixteen-year-old Nao has decided thereʹs only one escape from her aching loneliness and her classmatesʹ bullying. But before she ends it all, Nao first plans to document the life of her great grandmother, a Buddhist nun whoʹs lived more than a century. A diary is Naoʹs only solace--and will touch lives in ways she can scarcely imagine. Across the Pacific, we meet Ruth, a novelist living on a remote island who discovers a collection of artifacts washed ashore in a Hello Kitty lunchbox--possibly debris from the devastating 2011 tsunami. As the mystery of its contents unfolds, Ruth is pulled into the past, into Naoʹs drama and her unknown fate, and forward into her own future. Full of Ozekiʹs signature humor and deeply engaged with the relationship between writer and reader, past and present, fact and fiction, quantum physics, history, and myth, A Tale for the Time Being is a brilliantly inventive, beguiling story of our shared humanity and the search for home"--
catalogue key
8912511
 
Includes bibliographical references.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 2013-01-14:
Ozeki's absorbing third novel (after All Over Creation) is an extended meditation on writing, time, and people in time: "time beings." Nao Yasutani is a Japanese schoolgirl who plans to "drop out of time"-to kill herself as a way of escaping her dreary life. First, though, she intends to write in her diary the life story of her great-grandmother Jiko, a Zen Buddhist nun. But Nao actually ends up writing her own life story, and the diary eventually washes up on the shore of Canada's Vancouver Island, where a novelist called Ruth lives. Ruth finds the diary in a freezer bag with some old letters in French and a vintage watch. Ruth's investigation into how the bag traveled from Japan to her island, and why it contains what it does, alternates with Nao's chapters. The characters' lives are finely drawn, from Ruth's rustic lifestyle to the Yasutani family's straitened existence after moving from Sunnyvale, Calif., to Tokyo. Nao's winsome voice contrasts with Ruth's intellectual ponderings to make up a lyrical disquisition on writing's power to transcend time and place. This tale from Ozeki, a Zen Buddhist priest, is sure to please anyone who values a good story broadened with intellectual vigor. Agent: Molly Friedrich, Friedrich Literary Agency. (Mar. 12) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
Appeared in Library Journal on 2013-04-15:
Ozeki's beautifully crafted work, which arrives a decade after her last novel, All Over Creation, strives to unravel the mystery of a 16-year-old Japanese American girl's diary found washed ashore in Whaletown, British Columbia. Born in Sunnyvale, CA, Nao logs her diary entries from Japan since her father returned the family there following the burst of the dot-com bubble. Ozeki creates a host of colorful tales surrounding Nao and her 104-year-old great-grandmother, Jiko, a Buddhist nun, and great uncle Haruki, who was a kamikaze pilot in World War II. Meanwhile, in Canada, author Ruth and her husband, Oliver, are reading Nao's entries in the year 2012, wondering whether the diary is debris from the devastating tsunami that hit Japan in 2011, and whether Nao is still alive. VERDICT Ozeki adeptly intertwines past and present while weaving bits of history into her stories. Topics such as bullying, politics, depression, suicidal tendencies, and Buddhism are explored throughout, and as in previous novels, Ozeki validates her gift for writing prose that raises thought-provoking issues for readers to ponder long after finishing the book. [See Prepub Alert, 9/24/12.]-Shirley Quan, Orange Cty. P.L., Santa Ana, CA (c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
Review Quotes
Praise for A Tale for the Time Being "Magnificent . . . brings together a Japanese girl's diary and a transplanted American novelist to meditate on everything from bullying to the nature of conscience and the meaning of life. . . . The novel's seamless web of language, metaphor, and meaning can't be disentangled from its powerful emotional impact: These are characters we care for deeply, imparting vital life lessons through the magic of storytelling. A masterpiece, pure and simple." Kirkus Reviews (starred review) "Ozeki's absorbing novel is an extended meditation on writing, time, and people in time. . . . The characters' lives are finely drawn, from Ruth's rustic lifestyle to the Yasutani family's straitened existence after moving from Sunnyvale, California, to Tokyo. Nao's winsome voice contrasts with Ruth's intellectual ponderings to make up a lyrical disquisition on writing's power to transcend time and place. This tale from Ozeki, a Zen Buddhist priest, is sure to please anyone who values a good story broadened with intellectual vigor." Publishers Weekly "Remarkable . . . A highly unusual and rewarding novel that covers a vast scope of often disturbing subjects with great humanity and continually loops back to the ever human dilemma of how to live through difficult times." The Bookseller "An extraordinary novel about a courageous young woman, riven by loneliness, by time, and (ultimately) by tsunami. Nao is an inspired narrator and her quest to tell her great grandmother's story, to connect with her past and with the larger world is both aching and true. Ozeki is one of my favorite novelists and here she is at her absolute bestbewitching, intelligent, hilarious, and heartbreaking, often on the same page." Junot Díaz, Pulitzer Prize winner and author of This Is How You Lose Her " A Tale for the Time Being is a timeless story. Ruth Ozeki beautifully renders not only the devastation of the collision between man and the natural world, but also its often miraculous results." Alice Sebold, bestselling author of The Lovely Bones "Ingenious and touching. . . . I read it with great pleasure." Philip Pullman, award-winning author of The Golden Compass "One of the most deeply moving and thought-provoking novels I have read in a long time. In precise and luminous prose, Ozeki captures both the sweep and detail of our shared humanity. The result is gripping, fearless, inspiring and true ." Madeline Miller, author of the Orange Prize winner The Song of Achilles " A Tale for the Time Being is equal parts mystery and meditation. The mystery is a compulsive, gritty page-turner. The meditationon time and memory, on the oceanic movement of history, on impermanence and uncertainty, but also resilience and braveryis deep and gorgeous and wise. A completely satisfying, continually surprising, wholly remarkable achievement." Karen Joy Fowler, bestselling author of The Jane Austen Book Club "A great achievement, and the work of a writer at the height of her powers. Ruth Ozeki has not only reinvigorated the novel itself, the form, but she's given us the tried and true, deep and essential pleasure of characters we love and who matter." Jane Hamilton, bestselling author of A Map of the World "Profoundly original, with authentic, touching characters and grand, encompassing themes, Ruth Ozeki's novel proves that truly great storieslike this onecan both deepen our understanding of self and remind us of our shared humanity." Deborah Harkness, bestselling author of A Discovery of Witches and Shadow of Night "I've long been an admirer of Ruth Ozeki's work, and her exquisite, richly textured novel, A Tale for the Time Being , marks the stunning return of a writer at the height of her powers. Seamlessly weaving together tales of the past and present that are equally magical and heartbreaking, she transports us to the worlds of Nao and Jiko, in Japan, and Ruth, on a remote island in British Columbia, where their worlds collide as they reach across time to find the meaning of life and home. . . . A wise and wonderfully inventive story that will resonate through time." Gail Tsukiyama, bestselling author of The Samurai's Garden
Praise for A Tale for the Time Being "Magnificent . . . brings together a Japanese girl's diary and a transplanted American novelist to meditate on everything from bullying to the nature of conscience and the meaning of life. . . . The novel's seamless web of language, metaphor, and meaning can't be disentangled from its powerful emotional impact: These are characters we care for deeply, imparting vital life lessons through the magic of storytelling. A masterpiece, pure and simple." Kirkus Reviews (starred review) "Ozeki has shown herself to be a careful, considerate writer who obviously insists on writing what she wants to write and in the fashion she prefers. That special care and concern are also detectable in her latest novel, an intriguing, even beautiful narrative remarkable for its unusual but attentively structured plot. . . . We go from one story line to the other, back and forth across the Pacific, but the reader never loses place or interest." Booklist (starred review) "Ozeki's absorbing novel is an extended meditation on writing, time, and people in time. . . . The characters' lives are finely drawn, from Ruth's rustic lifestyle to the Yasutani family's straitened existence after moving from Sunnyvale, California, to Tokyo. Nao's winsome voice contrasts with Ruth's intellectual ponderings to make up a lyrical disquisition on writing's power to transcend time and place. This tale from Ozeki, a Zen Buddhist priest, is sure to please anyone who values a good story broadened with intellectual vigor." Publishers Weekly "Remarkable . . . A highly unusual and rewarding novel that covers a vast scope of often disturbing subjects with great humanity and continually loops back to the ever human dilemma of how to live through difficult times." The Bookseller "An extraordinary novel about a courageous young woman, riven by loneliness, by time, and (ultimately) by tsunami. Nao is an inspired narrator and her quest to tell her great grandmother's story, to connect with her past and with the larger world is both aching and true. Ozeki is one of my favorite novelists and here she is at her absolute bestbewitching, intelligent, hilarious, and heartbreaking, often on the same page." Junot Díaz, Pulitzer Prize winner and author of This Is How You Lose Her " A Tale for the Time Being is a timeless story. Ruth Ozeki beautifully renders not only the devastation of the collision between man and the natural world, but also its often miraculous results." Alice Sebold, bestselling author of The Lovely Bones "Ingenious and touching. . . . I read it with great pleasure." Philip Pullman, award-winning author of The Golden Compass "One of the most deeply moving and thought-provoking novels I have read in a long time. In precise and luminous prose, Ozeki captures both the sweep and detail of our shared humanity. The result is gripping, fearless, inspiring and true ." Madeline Miller, author of the Orange Prize winner The Song of Achilles " A Tale for the Time Being is equal parts mystery and meditation. The mystery is a compulsive, gritty page-turner. The meditationon time and memory, on the oceanic movement of history, on impermanence and uncertainty, but also resilience and braveryis deep and gorgeous and wise. A completely satisfying, continually surprising, wholly remarkable achievement." Karen Joy Fowler, bestselling author of The Jane Austen Book Club "A great achievement, and the work of a writer at the height of her powers. Ruth Ozeki has not only reinvigorated the novel itself, the form, but she's given us the tried and true, deep and essential pleasure of characters we love and who matter." Jane Hamilton, bestselling author of A Map of the World "Profoundly original, with authentic, touching characters and grand, encompassing themes, Ruth Ozeki's novel proves that truly great storieslike this onecan both deepen our understanding of self and remind us of our shared humanity." Deborah Harkness, bestselling author of A Discovery of Witches and Shadow of Night "I've long been an admirer of Ruth Ozeki's work, and her exquisite, richly textured novel, A Tale for the Time Being , marks the stunning return of a writer at the height of her powers. Seamlessly weaving together tales of the past and present that are equally magical and heartbreaking, she transports us to the worlds of Nao and Jiko, in Japan, and Ruth, on a remote island in British Columbia, where their worlds collide as they reach across time to find the meaning of life and home. . . . A wise and wonderfully inventive story that will resonate through time." Gail Tsukiyama, bestselling author of The Samurai's Garden
Praise for A Tale for the Time Being "Forget the proverbial message in a bottle: This Tale fractures clichés as it affirms the lifesaving power of words. . . . As Ozeki explores the ties between reader and writer, she offers a lesson in redemption that reinforces the pricelessness of the here and now." Elle "Magnificent . . . brings together a Japanese girl's diary and a transplanted American novelist to meditate on everything from bullying to the nature of conscience and the meaning of life. . . . The novel's seamless web of language, metaphor, and meaning can't be disentangled from its powerful emotional impact: These are characters we care for deeply, imparting vital life lessons through the magic of storytelling. A masterpiece, pure and simple." Kirkus Reviews (starred review) "Ozeki has shown herself to be a careful, considerate writer who obviously insists on writing what she wants to write and in the fashion she prefers. That special care and concern are also detectable in her latest novel, an intriguing, even beautiful narrative remarkable for its unusual but attentively structured plot. . . . We go from one story line to the other, back and forth across the Pacific, but the reader never loses place or interest." Booklist (starred review) "Ozeki's absorbing novel is an extended meditation on writing, time, and people in time. . . . The characters' lives are finely drawn, from Ruth's rustic lifestyle to the Yasutani family's straitened existence after moving from Sunnyvale, California, to Tokyo. Nao's winsome voice contrasts with Ruth's intellectual ponderings to make up a lyrical disquisition on writing's power to transcend time and place. This tale from Ozeki, a Zen Buddhist priest, is sure to please anyone who values a good story broadened with intellectual vigor." Publishers Weekly "Remarkable . . . A highly unusual and rewarding novel that covers a vast scope of often disturbing subjects with great humanity and continually loops back to the ever human dilemma of how to live through difficult times." The Bookseller "An extraordinary novel about a courageous young woman, riven by loneliness, by time, and (ultimately) by tsunami. Nao is an inspired narrator and her quest to tell her great grandmother's story, to connect with her past and with the larger world is both aching and true. Ozeki is one of my favorite novelists and here she is at her absolute bestbewitching, intelligent, hilarious, and heartbreaking, often on the same page." Junot Díaz, Pulitzer Prize winner and author of This Is How You Lose Her " A Tale for the Time Being is a timeless story. Ruth Ozeki beautifully renders not only the devastation of the collision between man and the natural world, but also its often miraculous results." Alice Sebold, bestselling author of The Lovely Bones "Ingenious and touching. . . . I read it with great pleasure." Philip Pullman, award-winning author of The Golden Compass "One of the most deeply moving and thought-provoking novels I have read in a long time. In precise and luminous prose, Ozeki captures both the sweep and detail of our shared humanity. The result is gripping, fearless, inspiring and true ." Madeline Miller, author of the Orange Prize winner The Song of Achilles " A Tale for the Time Being is equal parts mystery and meditation. The mystery is a compulsive, gritty page-turner. The meditationon time and memory, on the oceanic movement of history, on impermanence and uncertainty, but also resilience and braveryis deep and gorgeous and wise. A completely satisfying, continually surprising, wholly remarkable achievement." Karen Joy Fowler, bestselling author of The Jane Austen Book Club "A great achievement, and the work of a writer at the height of her powers. Ruth Ozeki has not only reinvigorated the novel itself, the form, but she's given us the tried and true, deep and essential pleasure of characters we love and who matter." Jane Hamilton, bestselling author of A Map of the World "Profoundly original, with authentic, touching characters and grand, encompassing themes, Ruth Ozeki's novel proves that truly great storieslike this onecan both deepen our understanding of self and remind us of our shared humanity." Deborah Harkness, bestselling author of A Discovery of Witches and Shadow of Night "I've long been an admirer of Ruth Ozeki's work, and her exquisite, richly textured novel, A Tale for the Time Being , marks the stunning return of a writer at the height of her powers. Seamlessly weaving together tales of the past and present that are equally magical and heartbreaking, she transports us to the worlds of Nao and Jiko, in Japan, and Ruth, on a remote island in British Columbia, where their worlds collide as they reach across time to find the meaning of life and home. . . . A wise and wonderfully inventive story that will resonate through time." Gail Tsukiyama, bestselling author of The Samurai's Garden
Praise for A Tale for the Time Being "As contemporary as a Japanese teenager's slang but as ageless as a Zen koan, Ruth Ozeki's new novel combines great storytelling with a probing investigation into the purpose of existence. . . . She plunges us into a tantalizing narration that brandishes mysteries to be solved and ideas to be explored. . . . Ozeki's profound affection for her characters makes A Tale for the Time Being as emotionally engaging as it is intellectually provocative." The Washington Post "Masterfully woven . . . Entwining Japanese language with WWII history, pop culture with Proust, Zen with quantum mechanics, Ozeki alternates between the voices of two women to produce a spellbinding tale." O, The Oprah Magazine "Forget the proverbial message in a bottle: This Tale fractures clichés as it affirms the lifesaving power of words. . . . As Ozeki explores the ties between reader and writer, she offers a lesson in redemption that reinforces the pricelessness of the here and now." Elle "A powerful yarn of fate and parallel lives." Good Housekeeping "Ozeki weaves together Nao's adolescent yearnings with Ruth's contemplative digressions, adding bits of Zen wisdom, as well as questions about agency, creativity, life, death, and human connections along the way. A Tale for the Time Being is a dreamy, spiritual investigation of how to gracefully meet the waves of time, which, in the end, come for us all." The Daily Beast "As we read Nao's story and the story of Ozeki's reading of it, as we go back and forth between the text and the notes, time expands for us. It opens up onto something resembling narrative eternity . . . page after page, slowly unfolding. And what a beautiful effect that is for a novel to create." Alan Cheuse, NPR's All Things Considered "Superb . . . her best and most adventurous novel to date . . . likely to leave readers feeling its emotional impact for a long time to come." BookPage "Magnificent . . . brings together a Japanese girl's diary and a transplanted American novelist to meditate on everything from bullying to the nature of conscience and the meaning of life. . . . The novel's seamless web of language, metaphor, and meaning can't be disentangled from its powerful emotional impact: These are characters we care for deeply, imparting vital life lessons through the magic of storytelling. A masterpiece, pure and simple." Kirkus Reviews (starred review) "An intriguing, even beautiful narrative remarkable for its unusual but attentively structured plot. . . . We go from one story line to the other, back and forth across the Pacific, but the reader never loses place or interest." Booklist (starred review) "Ozeki's absorbing novel is an extended meditation on writing, time, and people in time. . . . The characters' lives are finely drawn, from Ruth's rustic lifestyle to the Yasutani family's straitened existence after moving from Sunnyvale, California, to Tokyo. Nao's winsome voice contrasts with Ruth's intellectual ponderings to make up a lyrical disquisition on writing's power to transcend time and place. This tale from Ozeki, a Zen Buddhist priest, is sure to please anyone who values a good story broadened with intellectual vigor." Publishers Weekly "An extraordinary novel about a courageous young woman, riven by loneliness, by time, and (ultimately) by tsunami. Nao is an inspired narrator and her quest to tell her great grandmother's story, to connect with her past and with the larger world is both aching and true. Ozeki is one of my favorite novelists and here she is at her absolute bestbewitching, intelligent, hilarious, and heartbreaking, often on the same page." Junot Díaz, Pulitzer Prize winner and author of This Is How You Lose Her " A Tale for the Time Being is a timeless story. Ruth Ozeki beautifully renders not only the devastation of the collision between man and the natural world, but also its often miraculous results." Alice Sebold, bestselling author of The Lovely Bones "Ingenious and touching. . . . I read it with great pleasure." Philip Pullman, award-winning author of The Golden Compass "One of the most deeply moving and thought-provoking novels I have read in a long time. In precise and luminous prose, Ozeki captures both the sweep and detail of our shared humanity. The result is gripping, fearless, inspiring and true ." Madeline Miller, author of the Orange Prize winner The Song of Achilles " A Tale for the Time Being is equal parts mystery and meditation. The mystery is a compulsive, gritty page-turner. The meditationon time and memory, on the oceanic movement of history, on impermanence and uncertainty, but also resilience and braveryis deep and gorgeous and wise. A completely satisfying, continually surprising, wholly remarkable achievement." Karen Joy Fowler, bestselling author of The Jane Austen Book Club "A great achievement, and the work of a writer at the height of her powers. Ruth Ozeki has not only reinvigorated the novel itself, the form, but she's given us the tried and true, deep and essential pleasure of characters we love and who matter." Jane Hamilton, bestselling author of A Map of the World "Profoundly original, with authentic, touching characters and grand, encompassing themes, Ruth Ozeki's novel proves that truly great storieslike this onecan both deepen our understanding of self and remind us of our shared humanity." Deborah Harkness, bestselling author of A Discovery of Witches and Shadow of Night "I've long been an admirer of Ruth Ozeki's work, and her exquisite, richly textured novel, A Tale for the Time Being , marks the stunning return of a writer at the height of her powers. Seamlessly weaving together tales of the past and present that are equally magical and heartbreaking, she transports us to the worlds of Nao and Jiko, in Japan, and Ruth, on a remote island in British Columbia, where their worlds collide as they reach across time to find the meaning of life and home. . . . A wise and wonderfully inventive story that will resonate through time." Gail Tsukiyama, bestselling author of The Samurai's Garden
Praise for A Tale for the Time Being "An exquisite novel: funny, tragic, hard-edged and ethereal at once." David Ulin, Los Angeles Times "As contemporary as a Japanese teenager's slang but as ageless as a Zen koan, Ruth Ozeki's new novel combines great storytelling with a probing investigation into the purpose of existence. . . . She plunges us into a tantalizing narration that brandishes mysteries to be solved and ideas to be explored. . . . Ozeki's profound affection for her characters makes A Tale for the Time Being as emotionally engaging as it is intellectually provocative." The Washington Post "A terrific novel full of breakthroughs both personal and literary. . . . Ozeki revels in Tokyo teen culturethis goes far beyond Hello Kittyand explores quantum physics, military applications of computer video games, Internet bullying, and Marcel Proust, all while creating a vulnerable and unique voice for the sixteen-year-old girl at its center. . . . Ozeki has produced a dazzling and humorous work of literary origami. . . . Nao's voicefunny, profane and deepis stirring and unforgettable as she ponders the meaning of her life." The Seattle Times "Beautifully written, intensely readable and richly layered . . . one of the best books of the year so far." St. Louis Post-Dispatch "Masterfully woven . . . Entwining Japanese language with WWII history, pop culture with Proust, Zen with quantum mechanics, Ozeki alternates between the voices of two women to produce a spellbinding tale." O, The Oprah Magazine "Forget the proverbial message in a bottle: This Tale fractures clichés as it affirms the lifesaving power of words. . . . As Ozeki explores the ties between reader and writer, she offers a lesson in redemption that reinforces the pricelessness of the here and now." Elle "A powerful yarn of fate and parallel lives." Good Housekeeping "Ozeki weaves together Nao's adolescent yearnings with Ruth's contemplative digressions, adding bits of Zen wisdom, as well as questions about agency, creativity, life, death, and human connections along the way. A Tale for the Time Being is a dreamy, spiritual investigation of how to gracefully meet the waves of time, which, in the end, come for us all." The Daily Beast "As we read Nao's story and the story of Ozeki's reading of it, as we go back and forth between the text and the notes, time expands for us. It opens up onto something resembling narrative eternity . . . page after page, slowly unfolding. And what a beautiful effect that is for a novel to create." Alan Cheuse, NPR's All Things Considered "Superb . . . her best and most adventurous novel to date . . . likely to leave readers feeling its emotional impact for a long time to come." BookPage "Magnificent . . . brings together a Japanese girl's diary and a transplanted American novelist to meditate on everything from bullying to the nature of conscience and the meaning of life. . . . The novel's seamless web of language, metaphor, and meaning can't be disentangled from its powerful emotional impact: These are characters we care for deeply, imparting vital life lessons through the magic of storytelling. A masterpiece, pure and simple." Kirkus Reviews (starred review) "An intriguing, even beautiful narrative remarkable for its unusual but attentively structured plot. . . . We go from one story line to the other, back and forth across the Pacific, but the reader never loses place or interest." Booklist (starred review) "Ozeki's absorbing novel is an extended meditation on writing, time, and people in time. . . . The characters' lives are finely drawn, from Ruth's rustic lifestyle to the Yasutani family's straitened existence after moving from Sunnyvale, California, to Tokyo. Nao's winsome voice contrasts with Ruth's intellectual ponderings to make up a lyrical disquisition on writing's power to transcend time and place. This tale from Ozeki, a Zen Buddhist priest, is sure to please anyone who values a good story broadened with intellectual vigor." Publishers Weekly "An extraordinary novel about a courageous young woman, riven by loneliness, by time, and (ultimately) by tsunami. Nao is an inspired narrator and her quest to tell her great grandmother's story, to connect with her past and with the larger world is both aching and true. Ozeki is one of my favorite novelists and here she is at her absolute bestbewitching, intelligent, hilarious, and heartbreaking, often on the same page." Junot Díaz, Pulitzer Prize winner and author of This Is How You Lose Her " A Tale for the Time Being is a timeless story. Ruth Ozeki beautifully renders not only the devastation of the collision between man and the natural world, but also its often miraculous results." Alice Sebold, bestselling author of The Lovely Bones "Ingenious and touching. . . . I read it with great pleasure." Philip Pullman, award-winning author of The Golden Compass "One of the most deeply moving and thought-provoking novels I have read in a long time. In precise and luminous prose, Ozeki captures both the sweep and detail of our shared humanity. The result is gripping, fearless, inspiring and true ." Madeline Miller, author of the Orange Prize winner The Song of Achilles " A Tale for the Time Being is equal parts mystery and meditation. The mystery is a compulsive, gritty page-turner. The meditationon time and memory, on the oceanic movement of history, on impermanence and uncertainty, but also resilience and braveryis deep and gorgeous and wise. A completely satisfying, continually surprising, wholly remarkable achievement." Karen Joy Fowler, bestselling author of The Jane Austen Book Club "A great achievement, and the work of a writer at the height of her powers. Ruth Ozeki has not only reinvigorated the novel itself, the form, but she's given us the tried and true, deep and essential pleasure of characters we love and who matter." Jane Hamilton, bestselling author of A Map of the World "Profoundly original, with authentic, touching characters and grand, encompassing themes, Ruth Ozeki's novel proves that truly great storieslike this onecan both deepen our understanding of self and remind us of our shared humanity." Deborah Harkness, bestselling author of A Discovery of Witches and Shadow of Night "I've long been an admirer of Ruth Ozeki's work, and her exquisite, richly textured novel, A Tale for the Time Being , marks the stunning return of a writer at the height of her powers. Seamlessly weaving together tales of the past and present that are equally magical and heartbreaking, she transports us to the worlds of Nao and
This item was reviewed in:
Publishers Weekly, January 2013
Booklist, February 2013
Globe & Mail, March 2013
The Australian, March 2013
Boston Globe, April 2013
Kirkus Reviews, April 2013
Library Journal, April 2013
New York Times Book Review, April 2013
New York Times Full Text Review, May 2013
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
A brilliant, unforgettable novel from bestselling author Ruth Ozeki -- longlisted for the Booker Prize "A'time being is someone who lives in time, and that means you, and me, and every one of us who is, or was, or ever will be." In Tokyo, sixteen-year-old Nao has decided there's only one escape from her aching loneliness and her classmates' bullying. But before she ends it all, Nao first plans to document the life of her great grandmother, a Buddhist nun who's lived more than a century. A diary is Nao's only solace--and will touch lives in ways she can scarcely imagine. Across the Pacific, we meet Ruth, a novelist living on a remote island who discovers a collection of artifacts washed ashore in a Hello Kitty lunchbox--possibly debris from the devastating 2011 tsunami. As the mystery of its contents unfolds, Ruth is pulled into the past, into Nao's drama and her unknown fate, and forward into her own future. Full of Ozeki's signature humor and deeply engaged with the relationship between writer and reader, past and present, fact and fiction, quantum physics, history, and myth, A Tale for the Time Being is a brilliantly inventive, beguiling story of our shared humanity and the search for home.
Main Description
A brilliant, unforgettable, and long-awaited novel from bestselling author Ruth Ozeki "A time being is someone who lives in time, and that means you, and me, and every one of us who is, or was, or ever will be." In Tokyo, sixteen-year-old Nao has decided there's only one escape from her aching loneliness and her classmates' bullying. But before she ends it all, Nao first plans to document the life of her great grandmother, a Buddhist nun who's lived more than a century. A diary is Nao's only solace-and will touch lives in ways she can scarcely imagine. Across the Pacific, we meet Ruth, a novelist living on a remote island who discovers a collection of artifacts washed ashore in a Hello Kitty lunchbox-possibly debris from the devastating 2011 tsunami. As the mystery of its contents unfolds, Ruth is pulled into the past, into Nao's drama and her unknown fate, and forward into her own future. Full of Ozeki's signature humor and deeply engaged with the relationship between writer and reader, past and present, fact and fiction, quantum physics, history, and myth, A Tale for the Time Being is a brilliantly inventive, beguiling story of our shared humanity and the search for home.
Main Description
A brilliant, unforgettable novel from bestselling author Ruth Ozeki--longlisted for the Booker Prize ""A time being is someone who lives in time, and that means you, and me, and every one of us who is, or was, or ever will be."" In Tokyo, sixteen-year-old Nao has decided there's only one escape from her aching loneliness and her classmates' bullying. But before she ends it all, Nao first plans to document the life of her great grandmother, a Buddhist nun who's lived more than a century. A diary is Nao's only solace--and will touch lives in ways she can scarcely imagine. Across the Pacific, we meet Ruth, a novelist living on a remote island who discovers a collection of artifacts washed ashore in a Hello Kitty lunchbox--possibly debris from the devastating 2011 tsunami. As the mystery of its contents unfolds, Ruth is pulled into the past, into Nao's drama and her unknown fate, and forward into her own future. Full of Ozeki's signature humor and deeply engaged with the relationship between writer and reader, past and present, fact and fiction, quantum physics, history, and myth, "A Tale for the Time Being" is a brilliantly inventive, beguiling story of our shared humanity and the search for home.
Description for Library
In Tokyo, shy, bullied 16-year-old Nao determines to end it all-but not before chronicling the life of her great-grandmother, a Buddhist nun. After the 2011 tsunami, a novelist named Ruth opens a Hello Kitty lunchbox thats fetched up on a remote island off North Americas coast and is immediately drawn into the story of Nao and her ancestor. Ozeki lives part-time in British Columbia and was recently ordained a Buddhist nun, so in some ways shes writing close to home. But heres betting that this award-winning novelist (My Year of Meats), also honored for her work in film, will take her narrative to the next level while remaining engagingly accessible; the best-selling Meats was translated into 11 languages and sold in 14 countries. Sales rep enthusiasm, too.
Main Description
A brilliant, unforgettable, and long-awaited novel from bestselling author Ruth Ozeki "A time being is someone who lives in time, and that means you, and me, and every one of us who is, or was, or ever will be." In Tokyo, sixteen-year-old Nao has decided there's only one escape from her aching loneliness and her classmates' bullying. But before she ends it all, Nao first plans to document the life of her great grandmother, a Buddhist nun who's lived more than a century. A diary is Nao's only solace--and will touch lives in ways she can scarcely imagine. Across the Pacific, we meet Ruth, a novelist living on a remote island who discovers a collection of artifacts washed ashore in a Hello Kitty lunchbox--possibly debris from the devastating 2011 tsunami. As the mystery of its contents unfolds, Ruth is pulled into the past, into Nao's drama and her unknown fate, and forward into her own future. Full of Ozeki's signature humor and deeply engaged with the relationship between writer and reader, past and present, fact and fiction, quantum physics, history, and myth, A Tale for the Time Being is a brilliantly inventive, beguiling story of our shared humanity and the search for home.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem