Catalogue


Evidence and method : scientific strategies of Isaac Newton and James Clerk Maxwell /
Peter Achinstein.
imprint
Oxford : Oxford University Press, [2013], c2013.
description
xv, 177 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
ISBN
0199921857 (hardcover : acid-free paper), 9780199921850 (hardcover : acid-free paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Oxford : Oxford University Press, [2013], c2013.
isbn
0199921857 (hardcover : acid-free paper)
9780199921850 (hardcover : acid-free paper)
contents note
A problem about evidence -- Newton's rules -- Newtonian extensions, a rival, justifying induction, and evidence -- What to do if you cannot establish a theory : Maxwell's three methods.
catalogue key
8910031
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"It is clear and, in places, almost conversational. It would be accessible to general readers or undergraduates. Scholars with an interest in Achinstein's work will find it valuable.... It is pleasant reading, and I commend it to anyone who is curious about the lessons that might be drawn from Newton and Maxwell or about the strategic conception of method that Achinstein sketches."--P.D. Magnus, Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Long Description
What is meant by scientific evidence, and how can a definition of this concept be applied in the sciences to determine whether observed facts constitute evidence that a given theory is true?In this book, Peter Achinstein proposes and defends several objective concepts of evidence. He then explores the question of whether a scientific method, such as that represented in the four "Rules for the Study of Natural Philosophy" that Isaac Newton invoked in proving his law of gravity, can be employed in demonstrating how the proposed definitions of evidence are to be applied to real scientific cases. In answering this question, he offers a new interpretation of Newton's controversialrules. Contrary to what many methodologists assume, whether the rules, so interpreted, can be used to determine whether observed phenomena provide evidence for a theory is an empirical question, not an a priori one. Finally, in order to deal with numerous cases in which evidence is insufficient toestablish a theory, or where no theory is even available, Achinstein describes and defends three scientific methods proposed by the 19th century theoretical physicist James Clerk Maxwell, in the course of developing his electrical and molecular theories.
Main Description
What is meant by scientific evidence, and how can a definition of this concept be applied in the sciences to determine whether observed facts constitute evidence that a given theory is true? In this book, Peter Achinstein proposes and defends several objective concepts of evidence. He then explores the question of whether a scientific method, such as that represented in the four "Rules for the Study of Natural Philosophy" that Isaac Newton invoked in proving his law of gravity, can be employed in demonstrating how the proposed definitions of evidence are to be applied to real scientific cases. In answering this question, he offers a new interpretation of Newton's controversial rules. Contrary to what many methodologists assume, whether the rules, so interpreted, can be used to determine whether observed phenomena provide evidence for a theory is an empirical question, not an a priori one. Finally, in order to deal with numerous cases in which evidence is insufficient to establish a theory, or where no theory is even available, Achinstein describes and defends three scientific methods proposed by the 19th century theoretical physicist James Clerk Maxwell, in the course of developing his electrical and molecular theories.
Main Description
What is meant by scientific evidence, and how can a definition of this concept be applied in the sciences to determine whether observed facts constitute evidence that a given theory is true? In this book, Peter Achinstein proposes and defends several objective concepts of evidence. He then explores the question of whether a scientific method, such as that represented in the four "Rules for the Study of Natural Philosophy" that Isaac Newton invoked in proving his law of gravity, can beemployed in demonstrating how the proposed definitions of evidence are to be applied to real scientific cases. In answering this question, he offers a new interpretation of Newton's controversial rules. Contrary to what many methodologists assume, whether the rules, so interpreted, can be used to determine whether observed phenomena provide evidence for a theory is an empirical question, not an a priori one. Finally, in order to deal with numerous cases in which evidence is insufficient to establish a theory, or where no theory is even available, Achinstein describes and defends three scientific methods proposed by the 19th century theoretical physicist James Clerk Maxwell, in the course of developing his electrical and molecular theories.
Main Description
What is meant by scientific evidence, and how can a definition of this concept be applied in the sciences to determine whether observed facts constitute evidence that a given theory is true?In this book, Peter Achinstein proposes and defends several objective concepts of evidence. He then explores the question of whether a scientific method, such as that represented in the four "Rules for the Study of Natural Philosophy" that Isaac Newton invoked in proving his law of gravity, can beemployed in demonstrating how the proposed definitions of evidence are to be applied to real scientific cases. In answering this question, he offers a new interpretation of Newton's controversial rules. Contrary to what many methodologists assume, whether the rules, so interpreted, can be used todetermine whether observed phenomena provide evidence for a theory is an empirical question, not an a priori one. Finally, in order to deal with numerous cases in which evidence is insufficient to establish a theory, or where no theory is even available, Achinstein describes and defends threescientific methods proposed by the 19th century theoretical physicist James Clerk Maxwell, in the course of developing his electrical and molecular theories.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xv
A Problem About Evidencep. 3
Newton's Rulesp. 43
Newtonian Extensions, a Rival, Justifying Induction, and Evidencep. 84
What to Do If You Cannot Establish a Theory: Maxwell's Three Methodsp. 127
Indexp. 175
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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