Catalogue


Citizens of Asian America : democracy and race during the Cold War /
Cindy I-Fen Cheng.
imprint
New York : New York University Press, 2013, c2013
description
xii, 273 p.
ISBN
0814759351 (cl : alk. paper), 9780814759356 (cl : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : New York University Press, 2013, c2013
isbn
0814759351 (cl : alk. paper)
9780814759356 (cl : alk. paper)
contents note
Introduction : Asian American racial formation and the image of American democracy -- Legislating nonwhite crossings into white suburbia -- Living in the suburbs, becoming Americans -- Asian American firsts and the progress toward racial integration -- McCarran Act persecutions and the fight for alien rights -- Advancing racial equality and internationalism through immigration reform -- Conclusion : Cold War America and the appeal to see past race.
catalogue key
8900019
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 247-260) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Cindy I-Fen Cheng is Associate Professor of History and Asian American Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"A marvelous and greatly-needed book, Cheng's chronicle of Asian American battles against restrictive covenants, housing discrimination, and politically-inspired deportations as well as her accounts of battles for professional positions and honors, immigration reform, and civil rights adds important new ideas, evidence, and arguments to the social history of the U.S. by revealing the crucial role played by Asian American racial formation in shaping the broader racial imagination of the nation."-George Lipsitz,author of How Racism Takes Place
"A marvelous and greatly-needed book, Cheng's chronicle of Asian American battles against restrictive covenants, housing discrimination, and politically-inspired deportations as well as her accounts of battles for professional positions and honors, immigration reform, and civil rights adds important new ideas, evidence, and arguments to the social history of the U.S. by revealing the crucial role played by Asian American racial formation in shaping the broader racial imagination of the nation."- George Lipsitz, author of How Racism Takes Place " Citizens of Asian America offers a significant contribution to the scholarship on Cold War racial politics by highlighting the significance of political discourse about and by Asians, particularly those of Chinese and Korean ancestry in the U.S. from World War II to 1965. Cheng deftly analyzes how various political actors provided competing cultural narratives about race, nation, and identity. Her interpretation of government reports, sociological studies, court cases, and other sources related to housing integration, alien sedition, and immigration rights, will be of interest to scholars of the Cold War, U.S. race relations, U.S.-Asia relations, and immigration." Judy Tzu-Chun Wu, Associate Professor of History and Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, Ohio State University
"A marvelous and greatly-needed book, Cheng's chronicle of Asian American battles against restrictive covenants, housing discrimination, and politically-inspired deportations as well as her accounts of battles for professional positions and honors, immigration reform, and civil rights adds important new ideas, evidence, and arguments to the social history of the U.S. by revealing the crucial role played by Asian American racial formation in shaping the broader racial imagination of the nation."- George Lipsitz, author of How Racism Takes Place" Citizens of Asian America offers a significant contribution to the scholarship on Cold War racial politics by highlighting the significance of political discourse about and by Asians, particularly those of Chinese and Korean ancestry in the U.S. from World War II to 1965. Cheng deftly analyzes how various political actors provided competing cultural narratives about race, nation, and identity. Her interpretation of government reports, sociological studies, court cases, and other sources related to housing integration, alien sedition, and immigration rights, will be of interest to scholars of the Cold War, U.S. race relations, U.S.-Asia relations, and immigration." Judy Tzu-Chun Wu, Associate Professor of History and Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, Ohio State University
"Citizens of Asian Americaoffers a significant contribution to the scholarship on Cold War racial politics by highlighting the significance of political discourse about and by Asians, particularly those of Chinese and Korean ancestry in the U.S. from World War II to 1965. Cheng deftly analyzes how various political actors provided competing cultural narratives about race, nation, and identity. Her interpretation of government reports, sociological studies, court cases, and other sources related to housing integration, alien sedition, and immigration rights, will be of interest to scholars of the Cold War, U.S. race relations, U.S.-Asia relations, and immigration."-Judy Tzu-Chun Wu,Associate Professor of History and Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, Ohio State University
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Summaries
Main Description
During the Cold War, Soviet propaganda highlighted U.S. racism in order to undermine the credibility of U.S. democracy. In response, incorporating racial and ethnic minorities in order to affirm that America worked to ensure the rights of all and was superior to communist countries became a national imperative. In, Citizens of Asian America , Cindy I-Fen Cheng explores how Asian Americans figured in this effort to shape the credibility of American democracy, even while the perceived "foreignness" of Asian Americans cast them as likely alien subversives whose activities needed monitoring following the communist revolution in China and the outbreak of the Korean War.While histories of international politics and U.S. race relations during the Cold War have largely overlooked the significance of Asian Americans, Cheng challenges the black-white focus of the existing historiography. She highlights how Asian Americans made use of the government's desire to be leader of the "free world" by advocating for civil rights reforms, such as housing integration, increased professional opportunities, and freedom from political persecution. Further, Cheng examines the liberalization of immigration policies, which worked not only to increase the civil rights of Asian Americans but also to improve the nation's ties with Asian countries, providing an opportunity for the U.S. government to broadcast, on a global scale, the freedom and opportunity that American society could offer.Cindy I-Fen Cheng is Associate Professor of History and Asian American Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
Main Description
During the Cold War, Soviet propaganda highlighted U.S. racism in order to undermine the credibility of U.S. democracy. In response, incorporating racial and ethnic minorities in order to affirm that America worked to ensure the rights of all and was superior to communist countries became a national imperative. In, Citizens of Asian America, Cindy I-Fen Cheng explores how Asian Americans figured in this effort to shape the credibility of American democracy, even while the perceived "foreignness" of Asian Americans cast them as likely alien subversives whose activities needed monitoring following the communist revolution in China and the outbreak of the Korean War. While histories of international politics and U.S. race relations during the Cold War have largely overlooked the significance of Asian Americans, Cheng challenges the black-white focus of the existing historiography. She highlights how Asian Americans made use of the government's desire to be leader of the "free world" by advocating for civil rights reforms, such as housing integration, increased professional opportunities, and freedom from political persecution. Further, Cheng examines the liberalization of immigration policies, which worked not only to increase the civil rights of Asian Americans but also to improve the nation's ties with Asian countries, providing an opportunity for the U.S. government to broadcast, on a global scale, the freedom and opportunity that American society could offer. Cindy I-Fen Cheng is Associate Professor of History and Asian American Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
Main Description
During the Cold War, Soviet propaganda highlighted U.S. racism in order to undermine the credibility of U.S. democracy. In response, incorporating racial and ethnic minorities in order to affirm that America worked to ensure the rights of all and was superior to communist countries became a national imperative. InCitizens of Asian America, Cindy I-Fen Cheng explores how Asian Americans figured in this effort to shape the credibility of American democracy, even while the perceived "foreignness" of Asian Americans cast them as likely alien subversives whose activities needed monitoring following the communist revolution in China and the outbreak of the Korean War. While histories of international politics and U.S. race relations during the Cold War have largely overlooked the significance of Asian Americans, Cheng challenges the black-white focus of the existing historiography. She highlights how Asian Americans made use of the government's desire to be leader of the "free world" by advocating for civil rights reforms, such as housing integration, increased professional opportunities, and freedom from political persecution. Further, Cheng examines the liberalization of immigration policies, which worked not only to increase the civil rights of Asian Americans but also to improve the nation's ties with Asian countries, providing an opportunity for the U.S. government to broadcast, on a global scale, the freedom and opportunity that American society could offer. Cindy I-Fen Cheng is Associate Professor of History and Asian American Studies at the University of Wisconsin Madison. In the Nation of Newcomers series
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. vii
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Introduction: Asian American Racial Formation and the Image of American Democracyp. 1
Legislating Nonwhite Crossings into White Suburbiap. 21
Living in the Suburbs, Becoming Americansp. 57
Asian American Firsts and the Progress toward Racial Integrationp. 85
McCarran Act Persecutions and the Fight for Alien Rightsp. 117
Advancing Racial Equality and Internationalism through Immigration Reformp. 149
Conclusion: Cold War America and the Appeal to See Past Racep. 191
Notesp. 209
Bibliographyp. 247
Indexp. 261
About the Authorp. 273
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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