Catalogue


James J. Kilpatrick : salesman for segregation /
William P. Hustwit.
imprint
Chapel Hill : The University of North Carolina Press, [2013], c2013
description
ix, 310 p. : ill. ; 25 cm
ISBN
146960213X (hardback), 9781469602134 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Chapel Hill : The University of North Carolina Press, [2013], c2013
isbn
146960213X (hardback)
9781469602134 (hardback)
abstract
"James J. Kilpatrick was a nationally known television personality, journalist, and columnist whose conservative voice rang out loudly and widely through the twentieth century. As editor of the Richmond News Leader, writer for the National Review, debater in the "Point/Counterpoint" portion of CBS's 60 Minutes, and supporter of conservative political candidates like Barry Goldwater, Kilpatrick had many platforms for his race-based brand of southern conservatism. In James J. Kilpatrick: Salesman for Segregation, William Hustwit delivers a comprehensive study of Kilpatrick's importance to the civil rights era and explores how his protracted resistance to both desegregation and egalitarianism culminated in an enduring form of conservatism that revealed a nation's unease with racial change. Relying on archival sources, including Kilpatrick's personal papers, Hustwit provides an invaluable look at what Gunnar Myrdal called the race problem in the "white mind" at the intersection of the postwar conservative and civil rights movements. Growing out of a painful family history and strongly conservative political cultures, Kilpatrick's personal values and self-interested opportunism contributed to America's ongoing struggles with race and reform"--
catalogue key
8900012
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 263-299) and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
James J. Kilpatrick was a nationally known television personality, journalist, and columnist whose conservative voice rang out loudly and widely through the twentieth century. As editor of the Richmond News Leader, writer for the National Review, debater in the "Point/Counterpoint" portion of CBS's 60 Minutes, and supporter of conservative political candidates like Barry Goldwater, Kilpatrick had many platforms for his race-based brand of southern conservatism. In James J. Kilpatrick: Salesman for Segregation, William Hustwit delivers a comprehensive study of Kilpatrick's importance to the civil rights era and explores how his protracted resistance to both desegregation and egalitarianism culminated in an enduring form of conservatism that revealed a nation's unease with racial change.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 2013-03-25:
A visiting assistant professor of history at the University of Mississippi traces the intellectual journey of James J. Kilpatrick from regional southern journalist to one of the most prominent conservative commentators of the latter half of the 20th century. Kilpatrick focused his early career on creating supposedly acceptable public arguments against desegregation by "elevat[ing] the level of debate beyond race" and into the realm of constitutional theory-as a harbinger of FOX News and the conservative talk radio cadre, he is most interesting as an embodiment of how desperately the south fought integration. Hustwit's analysis reveals how many of their tactics-e.g., asserting that "real affirmative action meant letting blacks help themselves"-have become standards of conservative rhetoric, and it is sobering to discover how readily the mass media and society at large accepted Kilpatrick's overt racism, even as late as 1963. (After Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his "I Have a Dream" speech, Kilpatrick wrote a solicited article for the Saturday Evening Post entitled "The Hell He Is Equal." To the magazine's credit they decided in the wake of the Birmingham church bombings not to publish it.) Hustwit's history will likely find a limited scholarly audience, but it represents an important aspect of the Civil Rights movement. 9 illus. (May) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"An engrossing new biography. . . . [Hustwit] has done a first-rate job of providing a much-needed biography of one of the South's most important journalists of the 20th century." - Raleigh News & Observer
"In sparkling and accessible prose, Hustwit provides James Kilpatrick with an intelligent, fair assessment. An important contribution to our understanding of modern conservatism in the South."--William A. Link, University of Florida
"Traces the intellectual journey of James J. Kilpatrick from regional southern journalist to one of the most prominent conservative commentators of the latter half of the 20th century . . . . It represents an important aspect of the Civil Rights movement."--###Publishers Weekly#
This item was reviewed in:
Publishers Weekly, March 2013
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Summaries
Main Description
James J. Kilpatrick was a nationally known television personality, journalist, and columnist whose conservative voice rang out loudly and widely through the twentieth century. As editor of the Richmond News Leader , writer for the National Review , debater in the "Point/Counterpoint" portion of CBS's 60 Minutes , and supporter of conservative political candidates like Barry Goldwater, Kilpatrick had many platforms for his race-based brand of southern conservatism. In James J. Kilpatrick: Salesman for Segregation , William Hustwit delivers a comprehensive study of Kilpatrick's importance to the civil rights era and explores how his protracted resistance to both desegregation and egalitarianism culminated in an enduring form of conservatism that revealed a nation's unease with racial change. Relying on archival sources, including Kilpatrick's personal papers, Hustwit provides an invaluable look at what Gunnar Myrdal called the race problem in the "white mind" at the intersection of the postwar conservative and civil rights movements. Growing out of a painful family history and strongly conservative political cultures, Kilpatrick's personal values and self-interested opportunism contributed to America's ongoing struggles with race and reform.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Introductionp. 1
Into the Byrd Cagep. 7
Jim Cronyismp. 41
If at First You Don't Secedep. 79
A Cross of Goldwaterp. 107
Newspeakp. 143
The Revolution Will Not Be Televisedp. 202
Notesp. 225
Bibliographyp. 263
Indexp. 301
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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