Catalogue


The Faustian century : German literature and culture in the age of Luther and Faustus /
edited by J.M. van der Laan and Andrew Weeks.
imprint
Rochester, NY : Camden House, 2013.
description
viii, 399 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
1571135529 (hbk. : alk. paper), 9781571135520 (hbk. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Rochester, NY : Camden House, 2013.
isbn
1571135529 (hbk. : alk. paper)
9781571135520 (hbk. : alk. paper)
catalogue key
8899986
 
Includes bibliographical references ( p. [361]-379) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
J. M. van der Laan is Professor of German and Andrew Weeks is Professor of German and Comparative Literature, both at Illinois State University.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
These essays reveal the enduring significance of the story made famous in the 1587 'Faustbuch' and provide insights into the forces that gave the 16th century its distinct character.
Main Description
The Reformation and Renaissance, though segregated into distinct disciplines today, interacted and clashed intimately in Faust, the great figure that attained European prominence in the anonymous 1587 Historia von D. Johann Fausten. The original Faust behind Goethe's great drama embodies an obscure culture. In his century, Faust evolved from an obscure cipher to a universal symbol. The age explored here as "the Faustian century" invested the Faustbuch and its theme with a symbolic significance still of exceptional relevance today. The new essays in this volume complement one another, providing insights into the tensions and forces that gave the century its distinct character. Several essays seek Faust's prototypes. Others elaborate the symbolic function of his figure and discern the resonance of his tale in conflicting allegiances. This volume focuses on the intersection of historical accounts and literary imaginings, on shared aspects of the work and its times, on concerns with obedience and transgression, obsessions with the devil and curiosity about magic, and quandaries created by shifting religious and worldly authorities. Contributors: Kresten Thue Andersen, Frank Baron, Günther Bonheim, Albrecht Classen, Marguerite de Huszar Allen, Urs Leo Gantenbein, Karl Guthke, Michael Keefer, Paul Ernst Meyer, J. M. van der Laan, Helen Watanabe-O'Kelly, Andrew Weeks. J. M. van der Laan is Professor of German and Andrew Weeks is Professor of German and Comparative Literature, both at Illinois State University.
Unpaid Annotation
New essays revealing the enduring significance of the story made famous in the 1587 Faustbuch and providing insights into the forces that gave the sixteenth century its distinct character.
Main Description
The Reformation and Renaissance, though segregated into distinct disciplines today, interacted and clashed intimately in Faust, the great figure that attained European prominence in the anonymous 1587 Historia von D. Johann Fausten. The original Faust behind Goethe's great drama embodies a remote culture. In his century, Faust evolved from an obscure cipher to a universal symbol. The age explored here as "the Faustian century" invested the Faustbuch and its theme with a symbolic significance still of exceptional relevance today. The new essays in this volume complement one another, providing insights into the tensions and forces that gave the century its distinct character. Several essays seek Faust's prototypes. Others elaborate the symbolic function of his figure and discern the resonance of his tale in conflicting allegiances. This volume focuses on the intersection of historical accounts and literary imaginings, on shared aspects of the work and its times, on concerns with obedience and transgression, obsessions with the devil and curiosity about magic, and quandaries created by shifting religious and worldly authorities. Contributors: Marguerite de Huszar Allen, Kresten Thue Andersen, Frank Baron, Günther Bonheim, Albrecht Classen, Urs Leo Gantenbein, Karl S. Guthke, Michael Keefer, Paul Ernst Meyer, J. M. van der Laan, Helen Watanabe-O'Kelly, Andrew Weeks. J. M. van der Laan is Professor of German and Andrew Weeks is Professor of German and Comparative Literature, both at Illinois State University.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Introduction: Faust Scholarship and the Project at Handp. 1
The German Faustian Centuryp. 17
Faustus of the Sixteenth Century: His Life, Legend, and Mythp. 43
Cornelius Agrippa's Double Presence in the Faustian Centuryp. 67
Converging Magical Legends: Faustus, Paracelsus, and Trithemiusp. 93
Faust from Cipher to Sign and Pious to Profanep. 125
The Aesthetics of the 1587 Spies Historia von D. Johann Faustenp. 149
The Lutheran Faust: Repentance in the Augsburg Confession and the German Faustbuchp. 177
Marriage in the Historia von D. Johann Fausten (1587)p. 197
Antiauthoritarianism and the Problem of Knowledge in the Faustbuchp. 215
Exploring the "Three-Fold World": Faust as Alchemist, Astrologer, and Magicianp. 241
The Devil in the Early Modern World and in Sixteenth-Century German Devil Literaturep. 257
Encounters with "Schwarz-Hans": Jacob Bohme and the Literature of the Devil in the Sixteenth Centuryp. 285
D. Johann Faust and the Cannibals: Geographic Horizons in the Sixteenth Centuryp. 305
A Sixteenth-Century Chronology of Significant References to Faust with Parallel World Eventsp. 337
Select Bibliographyp. 361
Notes on the Contributorsp. 381
Indexp. 383
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem