Catalogue


Meeting once more : the Korean side of transnational adoption /
Elise Prébin.
imprint
New York : New York University Press, [2013], c2013
description
viii, 223 p. ; 24 cm
ISBN
0814760260 (cl : alk. paper), 9780814760260 (cl : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : New York University Press, [2013], c2013
isbn
0814760260 (cl : alk. paper)
9780814760260 (cl : alk. paper)
contents note
Shift in South Korean policies toward Korean adoptees, 1954-today -- Everyday encounters -- Holt International Summer School or three week re-Koreanization, 1999-2004 -- Stratification and homogeneity at Korean Broadcasting System, 2003 -- National reunification and family meetings -- Stories behind history -- Meetings' aftermaths -- Evolving relationship with my birth family -- Management of feelings -- Meeting the lost and the dead.
catalogue key
8899954
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 207-218) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Elise Prbin was a postdoctoral fellow and lecturer at Harvard University from 2007 to 2009 and served as Assistant Professor at Hanyang University (South Korea) from 2010 to 2011. She is now an independent scholar.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"A compelling ethnography of Korean adoptee reunions, which come to life not as inevitable kinship connections, but as social and cultural work. To great effect, Prébin zooms in on South Korea's signature reunion television program as a window on nothing short of the country's emotional life. . . . A must-read for those with interests in adoption, kinship, media, and the Koreas."-Nancy Abelmann,University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
"In this beautifully written book, Elise Prébin breaks new ground in the literature on transnational adoption. Juxtaposing the halting, uncertain course of her own emerging relationship with her birth family to the highly stylized emotional scripting of a popular Korean TV show, Prébin situates adoption in the context of other narratives of separation while analyzing its potential for realizing biological relatedness. She offers a highly original account that moves away from polarized debates to engage with the implications of transnational adoption over time for the birth family, the adopted person, and the sending nation, providing a powerful new voice that will transform the way we understand relatedness."-Barbara Yngvesson,Hampshire College
"Thoughtfully written, drawing on her own life experience as well as her anthropological training, Prébin provides us with a new window into the complex world of trans-national adoption. She weaves together kinship, media, and globalization as well as recent Korean history to offer us lessons about today's adoption practices." -Barbara Katz Rothman, author of Weaving A Family: Untangling Race and Adoption
"Thoughtfully written, drawing on her own life experience as well as her anthropological training, Prébin provides us with a new window into the complex world of trans-national adoption. She weaves together kinship, media, and globalization as well as recent Korean history to offer us lessons about today's adoption practices." Barbara Katz Rothman, author of Weaving A Family: Untangling Race and Adoption" A compelling ethnography of Korean adoptee reunions, which come to life not as inevitable kinship connections, but as social and cultural work. To great effect, Prébin zooms in on South Korea's signature reunion television program as a window on nothing short of the country's emotional life. . . . A must-read for those with interests in adoption, kinship, media, and the Koreas." Nancy Abelmann, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign "In this beautifully written book, Elise Prébin breaks new ground in the literature on transnational adoption. Juxtaposing the halting, uncertain course of her own emerging relationship with her birth family to the highly stylized emotional scripting of a popular Korean TV show, Prébin situates adoption in the context of other narratives of separation while analyzing its potential for realizing biological relatedness. She offers a highly original account that moves away from polarized debates to engage with the implications of transnational adoption over time for the birth family, the adopted person, and the sending nation, providing a powerful new voice that will transform the way we understand relatedness." Barbara Yngvesson, Hampshire College
"Thoughtfully written, drawing on her own life experience as well as her anthropological training, Prbin provides us with a new window into the complex world of trans-national adoption. She weaves together kinship, media, and globalization as well as recent Korean history to offer us lessons about today's adoption practices." Barbara Katz Rothman, author of Weaving A Family: Untangling Race and Adoption "A compelling ethnography of Korean adoptee reunions, which come to life not as inevitable kinship connections, but as social and cultural work. To great effect, Prbin zooms in on South Korea's signature reunion television program as a window on nothing short of the country's emotional life. . . . A must-read for those with interests in adoption, kinship, media, and the Koreas." Nancy Abelmann, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign"In this beautifully written book, Elise Prbin breaks new ground in the literature on transnational adoption. Juxtaposing the halting, uncertain course of her own emerging relationship with her birth family to the highly stylized emotional scripting of a popular Korean TV show, Prbin situates adoption in the context of other narratives of separation while analyzing its potential for realizing biological relatedness. She offers a highly original account that moves away from polarized debates to engage with the implications of transnational adoption over time for the birth family, the adopted person, and the sending nation, providing a powerful new voice that will transform the way we understand relatedness." Barbara Yngvesson, Hampshire College
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
A great mobilization began in South Korea in the 1990s: adult transnational adoptees began to return to their birth country and meet for the first time with their birth parents--sometimes in televised encounters which garnered high ratings. What makes the case of South Korea remarkable is the sheer scale of the activity that has taken place around the adult adoptees' return, and by extension the national significance that has been accorded to these family meetings.Informed by the author's own experience as an adoptee and two years of ethnographic research in Seoul, Meeting Once More sheds light on an understudied aspect of transnational adoption: the impact of adoptees on their birth country, and especially on their birth families. The volume offers a complex and fascinating contribution to the study of new kinship models, migration, and the anthropology of media.Elise Prbin was born in South Korea in 1978, was raised in France, and is now living in New York City with her husband and daughter. In 2006 she obtained her PhD at University of Paris X-Nanterre in social anthropology, was a postdoc and lecturer at Harvard University from 2007 to 2009 and served as Assistant Professor at Hanyang University (South Korea) from 2010 to 2011. She is now an independent scholar.
Main Description
A great mobilization began in South Korea in the 1990s: adult transnational adoptees began to return to their birth country and meet for the first time with their birth parents-sometimes in televised encounters which garnered high ratings. What makes the case of South Korea remarkable is the sheer scale of the activity that has taken place around the adult adoptees' return, and by extension the national significance that has been accorded to these family meetings. Informed by the author's own experience as an adoptee and two years of ethnographic research in Seoul, Meeting Once More sheds light on an understudied aspect of transnational adoption: the impact of adoptees on their birth country, and especially on their birth families. The volume offers a complex and fascinating contribution to the study of new kinship models, migration, and the anthropology of media. Elise Prébin was born in South Korea in 1978, was raised in France, and is now living in New York City with her husband and daughter. In 2006 she obtained her PhD at University of Paris X-Nanterre in social anthropology, was a postdoc and lecturer at Harvard University from 2007 to 2009 and served as Assistant Professor at Hanyang University (South Korea) from 2010 to 2011. She is now an independent scholar.
Main Description
"Thoughtfully written, drawing on her own life experience as well as her anthropological training, Prébin provides us with a new window into the complex world of trans-national adoption. She weaves together kinship, media, and globalization as well as recent Korean history to offer us lessons about today's adoption practices." Barbara Katz Rothman, author ofWeaving A Family: Untangling Race and Adoption A great mobilization began in South Korea in the 1990s: adult transnational adoptees began to return to their birth country and meet for the first time with their birth parentssometimes in televised encounters which garnered high ratings. What makes the case of South Korea remarkable is the sheer scale of the activity that has taken place around the adult adoptees' return, and by extension the national significance that has been accorded to these family meetings. Informed by the author's own experience as an adoptee and two years of ethnographic research in Seoul,Meeting Once Moresheds light on an understudied aspect of transnational adoption: the impact of adoptees on their birth country, and especially on their birth families. The volume offers a complex and fascinating contribution to the study of new kinship models, migration, and the anthropology of media. Elise Prébin was born in South Korea in 1978, was raised in France, and is now living in New York City with her husband and daughter. In 2006 she obtained her PhD at University of Paris X-Nanterre in social anthropology, was a postdoc and lecturer at Harvard University from 2007 to 2009 and served as Assistant Professor at Hanyang University (South Korea) from 2010 to 2011. She is now an independent scholar.
Main Description
"Thoughtfully written, drawing on her own life experience as well as her anthropological training, Prebin provides us with a new window into the complex world of trans-national adoption. She weaves together kinship, media, and globalization as well as recent Korean history to offer us lessons about today's adoption practices." Barbara Katz Rothman, author of Weaving A Family: Untangling Race and Adoption A great mobilization began in South Korea in the 1990s: adult transnational adoptees began to return to their birth country and meet for the first time with their birth parentssometimes in televised encounters which garnered high ratings. What makes the case of South Korea remarkable is the sheer scale of the activity that has taken place around the adult adoptees' return, and by extension the national significance that has been accorded to these family meetings. Informed by the author's own experience as an adoptee and two years of ethnographic research in Seoul, Meeting Once More sheds light on an understudied aspect of transnational adoption: the impact of adoptees on their birth country, and especially on their birth families. The volume offers a complex and fascinating contribution to the study of new kinship models, migration, and the anthropology of media. Elise Prebin was born in South Korea in 1978, was raised in France, and is now living in New York City with her husband and daughter. In 2006 she obtained her PhD at University of Paris X-Nanterre in social anthropology, was a postdoc and lecturer at Harvard University from 2007 to 2009 and served as Assistant Professor at Hanyang University (South Korea) from 2010 to 2011. She is now an independent scholar.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. vii
Introductionp. 1
Meeting the Birth Country
Shift in South Korean Policies toward Korean Adoptees, 1954-Todayp. 21
Everyday Encountersp. 35
Holt International Summer School or Three-Week Re-Koreanization, 1999-2004p. 52
Stratification and Homogeneity at the Korean Broadcasting System, 2003p. 68
National Reunification and Family Meetingsp. 87
Meeting the Birth Family
Stories behind Historyp. 103
Meetings' Aftermathsp. 118
Evolving Relationship with My Birth Familyp. 133
Management of Feelingsp. 151
Meeting the Lost and the Deadp. 163
Conclusionp. 177
Notesp. 183
Bibliographyp. 207
Indexp. 219
About the Authorp. 223
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem