Catalogue


From the bullet to the ballot : the Illinois Chapter of the Black Panther Party and racial coalition politics in Chicago /
Jakobi Williams.
imprint
Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c2013.
description
xvi, 285 p. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0807838160 (cloth : alk. paper), 9780807838167 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c2013.
isbn
0807838160 (cloth : alk. paper)
9780807838167 (cloth : alk. paper)
contents note
Introduction : the Illinois Chapter of the Black Panther Party speaks for itself -- The political and social climate of Black Chicago, 1900-1970 -- The Illinois Chapter of the Black Panther Party -- Chicago and Oakland : a comparative analysis of the Illinois Chapter of the Black Panther Party and national headquarters -- The original rainbow coalition -- Law enforcement repression and the assassination of chairman Fred Hampton -- The legacy of the Illinois Chapter of the Black Panther Party.
catalogue key
8895759
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 261-277) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2013-09-01:
Chicago has long been the proving ground for ethnic and racial political coalition building. In the 1910s-20s, the city experienced substantial black immigration but became in the process the most residentially segregated of all major US cities. During the civil rights struggles of the 1960s, long-simmering frustration and anger led many lower-class blacks to the culturally attractive, militant Black Panther Party. Thus, long before Jesse Jackson's Rainbow Coalition, made famous in the 1980s, or Barack Obama's historic presidential campaigns more recently, the Illinois Chapter of the Black Panther Party (ILPBB) laid much of the groundwork for nontraditional grassroots political activism. The principal architect was a charismatic, marginally educated 20-year-old named Fred Hampton, tragically and brutally murdered by the Chicago police in December 1969 as part of an FBI-backed counter-intelligence program against what it considered subversive political groups. Among other things, Williams (Kentucky) "demonstrates how the ILPBB's community organizing methods and revolutionary self-defense ideology significantly influenced Chicago's machine politics, grassroots organizing, racial coalitions, and political behavior." Williams incorporates previously sealed secret Chicago police files and numerous oral histories. Photos and maps. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. K. Edgerton Montana State University at Billings
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Williams transforms the epic tale of the Illinois Black Panther Party into a compelling history. A gem of a book."--Komozi Woodard, Sarah Lawrence College
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, September 2013
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
In this comprehensive history of the Illinois Chapter of the Black Panther Party, Chicago native Jakobi Williams demonstrates that the city's Black Power movement was both a response to and an extension of the city's civil rights movement.
Main Description
In this comprehensive history of the Illinois Chapter of the Black Panther Party (ILBPP), Chicago native Jakobi Williams demonstrates that the city's Black Power movement was both a response to and an extension of the city's civil rights movement. Williams focuses on the life and violent death of Fred Hampton, a charismatic leader who served as president of the NAACP Youth Council and continued to pursue a civil rights agenda when he became chairman of the revolutionary Chicago-based Black Panther Party. Framing the story of Hampton and the ILBPP as a social and political history and using, for the first time, sealed secret police files in Chicago and interviews conducted with often reticent former members of the ILBPP, Williams explores how Hampton helped develop racial coalitions between the ILBPP and other local activists and organizations. Williams also recounts the history of the original Rainbow Coalition, created in response to Richard J. Daley's Democratic machine, to show how the Panthers worked to create an antiracist, anticlass coalition to fight urban renewal, political corruption, and police brutality.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. xiii
Abbreviations and Acronymsp. xvii
Introduction. The Illinois Chapter of the Black Panther Party Speaks for Itselfp. 1
The Political and Social Climate of Black Chicago, 1900-1970p. 15
The Illinois Chapter of the Black Panther Partyp. 53
Chicago and Oakland: A Comparative Analysis of the Illinois Chapter of the Black Panther Party and National, Headquartersp. 91
The Original Rainbow Coalitionp. 125
Law Enforcement Repression and the Assassination of Chairman Fred Hamptonp. 167
The Legacy of the Illinois Chapter of the Black Panther Partyp. 191
Notesp. 219
Bibliographyp. 261
Indexp. 279
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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