Catalogue


The League of Nations /
Ruth Henig.
imprint
London : Haus Histories, 2010.
description
viii, 240 p. : maps ; 21 cm.
ISBN
1905791755 (hbk.), 9781905791750 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
London : Haus Histories, 2010.
isbn
1905791755 (hbk.)
9781905791750 (hbk.)
catalogue key
8886566
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 224-231) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
'What an intellectual feast Alan Sharp and his collaborators have served us with this comprehensive treatment of the peace conferences that ended the Great War! What makes this series an important contribution to the historical literature are the distinguished roster of contributors, the careful attention devoted to persons and events not only in Europe and America but also in the non-Western world, and the illuminating demonstration of how this critical turning point in modern world history shaped the rest of the twentieth century and beyond.' William R. Keylor Professor of History and International Relations Director, International History Institute, Boston University 'As a glance at the table of contents shows, there are always more and interesting things to be said on the perennially fascinating question of the Paris Peace Conference. Sadly, too, there is much that is still relevant for our own troubled world.' Margaret Macmillan Warden, St. Antony's College, Oxford University, author of 'Peacemakers' (John Murray, 2001)
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Summaries
Main Description
90 years ago the League of Nations convened for the first time hoping to settle disputes by diplomacy not war. This book looks at how the League was shaped and the multi-faceted body which emerged, and how it was used in ensuing years to counter territorial ambitions and restrict armaments, as well as its role in human rights and refugee issues. The failure of the League to prevent the Second World War would lead to its dissolution and the subsequent creation of the United Nations. Can the UN's fate be ascertained by reading the history of its predecessor?
Main Description
Ninety years ago the League of Nations convened for the first time, hoping to settle disputes by diplomacy, not war. Failure to prevent World War II led to its dissolution and the subsequent creation of the United Nations. Can the United Nations' fate be ascertained by reading the history of its predecessor?
Main Description
Ninety years ago the League of Nations convened for the first time, hoping to settle disputes by diplomacy, not war. Failure to prevent World War II led to its dissolution and the subsequent creation of the United Nations. Can the United Nations’ fate be ascertained by reading the history of its predecessor?
Main Description
The Paris peacemakers thought deeply about establishing an international body of authority to prevent future wars.

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