Catalogue


Boy 30529 : a memoir /
Felix Weinberg.
imprint
London ; New York : Verso, 2013, c2013
description
xix, 168 p. : ill. ; 22 cm
ISBN
1781680787 (pbk. : alk. paper), 9781781680780 (pbk. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
London ; New York : Verso, 2013, c2013
isbn
1781680787 (pbk. : alk. paper)
9781781680780 (pbk. : alk. paper)
catalogue key
8886559
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
'oeA sensitive, witty, intelligent - and ultimately, extremely moving - memoir.'
A sensitive, witty, intelligent - and ultimately, extremely moving - memoir.
'oeAllthose who care about the proper documenting of this horrendous era must begrateful to Felix Weinberg for giving us this insightful and ultimatelyuplifting account.'
'oeFelix Weinberg's memoir stands out from other Holocaust memoirs in its accomplished style, its powers of exact recollection and depiction and in its dry humour.'
A very witty and highly readable account of life in Nazi camps, with truly original information and an amazing sense of humour. A great lesson in resilience, survival, hope - and genuine modesty.
Felix Weinberg's memoir stands out from other Holocaust memoirs in its accomplished style, its powers of exact recollection and depiction and in its dry humour.
Allthose who care about the proper documenting of this horrendous era must begrateful to Felix Weinberg for giving us this insightful and ultimatelyuplifting account.
'oeA very witty and highly readable account of life in Nazi camps, with truly original information and an amazing sense of humour. A great lesson in resilience, survival, hope - and genuine modesty.'
This item was reviewed in:
Booklist, March 2013
Kirkus Reviews, April 2013
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
"Anyone who survived the exterminations camps must have an untypical story to tell. The typical camp story of the millions ended in death ... We, the few who survived the war and the majority who perished in the camps, did not use and would not have understood terms such as 'holocaust' or 'death march.' These were coined later, by outsiders." Boy 30529 tells the story of a child who at the age of twelve lost everything: hope, home, and even his own identity. Born into a respectable Czech family, Felix's early years were idyllic. But when Nazi persecution threatened in 1938, his father travelled to England, hoping to arrange for his family to emigrate there. His efforts came too late, and his wife and children fell into the hands of the Fascist occupiers. Thus begins a harrowing tale of survival, horror and determination. Over the following years, Felix survived five concentration camps, including Terezín, Auschwitz and Birkenau, as well as, by the skin of his teeth, the Death March from Blechhammer in 1945. Losing both his brother and mother in the camps, Felix was liberated at Buchenwald and eventually reunited at the age of seventeen with his father in Britain, where they built a new life together. Boy 30529 is an extraordinary memoir, as well as a meditation on the nature of memory. It helps us understand why the Holocaust remains a singular presence at the heart of historical debate.
Main Description
"Anyone who survived the exterminations camps must have an untypical story to tell. The typical camp story of the millions ended in death ... We, the few who survived the war and the majority who perished in the camps, did not use and would not have understood terms such as 'holocaust' or 'death march'. These were coined later, by outsiders." Boy 30529 tells the story of a boy who at the age of twelve lost everything: hope, family, and even his own identity. As Nazi persecutions grew in intensity, young Felix's father went to England to obtain travel papers to allow the family to emigrate from Czechoslovakia. But they never made it out of Prague. Felix spent the next three years in a series of concentration camps-Terezin, Auschwitz-Birkenau, Blechhammer, Gross-Rosen and Buchenwald-and survived the Death March from Blechhammer in 1945. The book is a meditation on memory and of how to forget, and how the Holocaust remains an event at the center of historical debate.
Bowker Data Service Summary
'Boy 30529' tells the story of a child who at the age of 12 lost everything: hope, home, and even his own identity. Born into a respectable Czech family, Felix's early years were idyllic. But when Nazi persecution threatened in 1938, his father travelled to England, hoping to arrange for his family to emigrate there. His efforts came too late, and his wife and children fell into the hands of the Fascist occupiers.
Bowker Data Service Summary
This is a searing, frank memoir of a childhood spent in German concentration camps.
Table of Contents
Forewordp. ix
Acknowledgementsp. xiii
Prefacep. xvii
Childhood
The Golden Yearsp. 1
Dark Cloudsp. 19
The End of Hopep. 35
The Camps
Holocaust Literature and Realityp. 53
Ghetto Theresienstadt (Terezín)p. 57
Auschwitz-Birkenaup. 67
Blechhammerp. 81
The Longest Walk, The Coldest Train Journeyp. 99
Buchenwaldp. 109
The Return
Praguep. 129
Ústí nad Orlicíp. 133
England
A Lancaster Bomberp. 145
My Fatherp. 151
Natural Philosophyp. 157
Appendix: Chronology 1942-45p. 167
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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