Catalogue


Slavery and emancipation in Islamic East Africa [electronic resource] : from honor to respectability /
Elisabeth McMahon.
imprint
Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2013.
description
xxvi, 265 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
ISBN
9781107025820 (hardback : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
series title
imprint
Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2013.
isbn
9781107025820 (hardback : alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8874979
 
Includes bibliographical references (pages 241-259) and index.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Main Description
Examining the process of abolition on the island of Pemba off the East African coast in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, this book demonstrates the links between emancipation and the redefinition of honour among all classes of people on the island. By examining the social vulnerability of ex-slaves and the former slave-owning elite caused by the abolition order of 1897, this study argues that moments of resistance on Pemba reflected an effort to mitigate vulnerability rather than resist the hegemonic power of elites or the colonial state. As the meaning of the Swahili word heshima shifted from honour to respectability, individuals' reputations came under scrutiny and the Islamic kadhi and colonial courts became an integral location for interrogating reputations in the community. This study illustrates the ways in which former slaves used piety, reputation, gossip, education, kinship and witchcraft to negotiate the gap between emancipation and local notions of belonging.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Examining the process of abolition on the island of Pemba off the East African coast in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, this book demonstrates the links between emancipation and the redefinition of honour among all classes of people on the island.
Description for Bookstore
Examining the process of abolition on the island of Pemba off the East African coast in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, this book demonstrates the links between emancipation and the redefinition of honor among all classes of people on the island. The book illustrates the ways in which former slaves used piety, reputation, gossip, education, kinship, and witchcraft to negotiate the gap between emancipation and local notions of belonging.
Description for Bookstore
Examining the process of abolition on the island of Pemba off the East African coast in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, this book demonstrates the links between emancipation and the redefinition of honour among all classes of people on the island.
Main Description
Examining the process of abolition on the island of Pemba off the East African coast in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, this book demonstrates the links between emancipation and the redefinition of honor among all classes of people on the island. By examining the social vulnerability of ex-slaves and the former slave-owning elite caused by the Abolition order of 1897, this study argues that moments of resistance on Pemba reflected an effort to mitigate vulnerability rather than resist the hegemonic power of elites or the colonial state. As the meanings of the Swahili word heshima shifted from honor to respectability, individuals' reputations came under scrutiny and the Islamic kadhi and colonial courts became an integral location for interrogating reputations in the community. This study illustrates the ways in which former slaves used piety, reputation, gossip, education, kinship, and witchcraft to negotiate the gap between emancipation and local notions of belonging.
Table of Contents
Preface
Introduction
Mzuri Kwao and slavery in eastern Africa
Reputation and disputing in the courts
Reputation, heshima, and community
Mitigating vulnerability and kinship
Magic, witchcraft, power, and vulnerability
Conclusion
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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