Catalogue


The unwritten diary of Israel Unger /
Carolyn Gammon and Israel Unger.
imprint
Waterloo, Ont. : Wilfrid Laurier University Press, c2013.
description
ix, 220 p. : ill.
ISBN
9781554588312 :
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
series title
series title
imprint
Waterloo, Ont. : Wilfrid Laurier University Press, c2013.
isbn
9781554588312 :
catalogue key
8867733
 
Includes bibliographical references.
Issued also in electronic format.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Born and raise in New Brunswick, Carolyn Gammon moved to Berlin in 1992. Her poetry, prose, and essays have appeared in anthologies in North America and Great Britain, and in translation. She is co-author of the Holocaust memoir Johanna Krause Twice Persecuted (WLU Press, 2007). Israel Unger was born in 1938 in Tarnow, Poland, and immigrated to Canada in 1951. He is Dean Emeritus of Science at the University of New Brunswick. Israel Unger was one of fifty Holocaust survivors to be honoured by the Government of Canada in 1998 in connection with the fiftieth anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Right. He was the educational advisor for Atlantic Canada for the Friends of Simon Wiesenthal Center for Holocaust Studies.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
At the beginning of the Nazi period, 25,000 Jewish people lived in Tarnow, Poland. By the end of the Second World War, nine remained. Like Anne Frank, Israel Unger and his family hid for two years in an attic crawl space. Against all odds, they emerged alive. Now, after decades of silence, here is Israel's 'unwritten diary'.
Main Description
At the beginning of the Nazi period, 25,000 Jewish people lived in Tarnow, Poland. By the end of the Second World War, nine remained. Like Anne Frank, Israel Unger and his family hid for two years in an attic crawl space. Against all odds, they emerged alive. Now, after decades of silence, here is Israel's "unwritten diary." Nine people lived behind that false wall above the Dagnan factory in Tarnow. Their stove was the chimney that went up through the attic; their windows were cracks in the wall. Survival depended on the food the adults leaving the hideout at night were able to forage. Even at the end of the war, however, Jewish people emerging from hiding were still not safe. After the infamous postwar Kielce pogrom, Israel's parents sent him and his brother as "orphans" to France in a program called Rescue Children, a Europe-wide attempt to find Jewish children orphaned by the Holocaust. When the family was finally reunited, they lived a precarious existence between France-as people sans pays -and England until the immigration papers for Canada came through in 1951. In Montreal, in the world described so well by Mordecai Richler, Israel's father, a co-owner of a factory in Poland, was reduced to sweeping factory floors. At the local yeshiva (Jewish high school), Israel discovered chemistry, and a few short years later he left poverty behind. He had a stellar academic career, married, and raised a family in Fredericton, New Brunswick. The Unwritten Diary of Israel Unger is as much a Holocaust story as it is a story of a young immigrant making every possible use of the opportunities Canada had to offer.
Main Description
At the beginning of the Nazi period, 25,000 Jewish people lived in Tarnow, Poland. By the end of the Second World War, nine remained. Like Anne Frank, Israel Unger and his family hid for two years in an attic crawl space. Against all odds, they emerged alive. Now, after decades of silence, here is Israel's "unwritten diary". Nine people lived behind that false wall above the Dagnan factory in Tarnow. Their stove was the chimney that went up through the attic; their windows were cracks in the wall. Survival depended on the food the adults leaving the hideout at night were able to forage. Even at the end of the war, however, Jewish people emerging from hiding were still not safe. After the infamous post-war Kielce pogrom, Israel's parents sent him and his brother as orphans to France in a program called Rescue Children, a Europe-wide attempt to find Jewish children orphaned by the Holocaust. When the family was finally reunited, they lived a precarious existence between France as people sans pays and England until the immigration papers for Canada came through in 1951. In Montreal, in the world described so well by Mordecai Richler, Israel's father, a co-owner of a factory in Poland, was reduced to sweeping factory floors. At the local yeshiva (Jewish high school), Israel discovered chemistry, and a few short years later he left poverty behind. He had a stellar academic career, married, and raised a family in Fredericton, New Brunswick. This is as much a Holocaust story as it is a story of a young immigrant making every possible use of the opportunities Canada had to offer.
Main Description
At the beginning of the Nazi period, 25,000 Jewish people lived in Tarnow, Poland. By the end of the Second World War, nine remained. Like Anne Frank, Israel Unger and his family hid for two years in an attic crawl space. Against all odds, they emerged alive. Now, after decades of silence, here is Ungers "unwritten diary." Nine people lived behind that false wall above the Dagnan flour mill in Tarnow. Their stove was the chimney that went up through the attic; their windows were cracks in the wall. Survival depended on the food the adults were able to forage outside at night. Even at the end of the war, however, Jewish people emerging from hiding were not safe. After the infamous postwar Kielce pogrom, Israels parents sent him and his brother as "orphans" to France in a program called Rescue Children, a Europe-wide attempt to find homes for Jewish children orphaned by the Holocaust. When the Unger family was finally reunited, they lived a precarious existence between France--as people "sans pays"--and England until the immigration papers for Canada came through in 1951. In Montreal, in the world described so well by Mordecai Richler, Israels father, a co-owner of a factory in Poland, was reduced to sweeping factory floors. At the local "yeshiva" (Jewish high school), Israel discovered chemistry, and a few short years later he left poverty behind. He had a stellar academic career, married, and raised a family in Fredericton, New Brunswick. "The Unwritten Diary of Israel Unger" is as much a Holocaust story as it is a story of a young immigrant making every possible use of the opportunities Canada had to offer.
Main Description
At the beginning of the Nazi period, 25,000 Jewish people lived in Tarnow, Poland. By the end of the Second World War, nine remained. Like Anne Frank, Israel Unger and his family hid for two years in an attic crawl space. Against all odds, they emerged alive. Now, after decades of silence, here is Unger's "unwritten diary." Nine people lived behind that false wall above the Dagnan flour mill in Tarnow. Their stove was the chimney that went up through the attic; their windows were cracks in the wall. Survival depended on the food the adults were able to forage outside at night. Even at the end of the war, however, Jewish people emerging from hiding were not safe. After the infamous postwar Kielce pogrom, Israel's parents sent him and his brother as "orphans" to France in a program called Rescue Children, a Europe-wide attempt to find homes for Jewish children orphaned by the Holocaust. When the Unger family was finally reunited, they lived a precarious existence between France-as people sans pays -and England until the immigration papers for Canada came through in 1951. In Montreal, in the world described so well by Mordecai Richler, Israel's father, a co-owner of a factory in Poland, was reduced to sweeping factory floors. At the local yeshiva (Jewish high school), Israel discovered chemistry, and a few short years later he left poverty behind. He had a stellar academic career, married, and raised a family in Fredericton, New Brunswick. The Unwritten Diary of Israel Unger is as much a Holocaust story as it is a story of a young immigrant making every possible use of the opportunities Canada had to offer.
Table of Contents
Forewordp. ix
The Only Jews in Poland
Srulik Is Born in Tar nowp. 1
Wysiedleniap. 4
My Father's Couragep. 7
Dagnan's Flour Millp. 9
The Hideoutp. 12
The Only Jews in Polandp. 16
Kissing a Soviet Soldier's Bootp. 20
Matzos from Americap. 22
Sans Pays
The Kielce Pogrom and a Gash on the Headp. 29
Becoming "Orphans"p. 31
Aix-les-Bainsp. 34
Sans Pays in Parisp. 38
Charlie and Sydney in Londonp. 40
Back to Paris: Quartier Père Lachaisep. 49
Visions of Canada: Mounties, Snow, and Sheepskinp. 53
Canadian Through and Through
An Airplane, a Stevedore, and His Plymouth: Arriving at Pier 21p. 57
Home à la Mordecai Richlerp. 59
Ich hob dir gegebn lebn zwei mol-"I gave you life twice"p. 64
The Yeshiva and Bnei Akivap. 68
Canadian Through and Throughp. 72
The Octet Rulep. 74
Collecting Butcher Billsp. 76
Kafkaesque Encountersp. 79
My Brother Charliep. 85
The Bubble Counter
Leaving Home: Montreal to Frederictonp. 89
The Bubble Counterp. 91
Photochemistry in Texasp. 94
Under the Chuppah in Minto, New Brunswickp. 96
The Young Professor-From Texas to Saint Johnp. 99
ALS-My Father's Deathp. 103
Charlie's Troublesp. 106
A Mark for Canadap. 108
Sharon and Sheilap. 112
The Best Grannyp. 119
Dean Unger
Dean Ungerp. 123
Struggles with Charliep. 127
My Mother and Her Backbone of Steelp. 133
Marlenep. 136
Making Up for Lost Timep. 143
Airplane Accidentp. 147
Telling My Storyp. 150
"They Know My Name Is Srulik!"
Return to Tarnowp. 155
A Modern Righteous Gentile: Meeting Adam Bartoszp. 161
Meeting Mr. Dagnanp. 163
Skorupap. 170
Kalman Goldberg-Outside the Hideoutp. 172
Rescue Children, Inc.p. 176
Ryglice and Dabrowap. 181
State Archives and Registry Officep. 183
My Birth Housep. 186
Matzevahs for My Familyp. 189
"They know my name is Srulik!"p. 193
"How did the Holocaust affect you?"p. 200
Afterword
Writing The Unwritten Diaryp. 203
Acknowledgementsp. 215
Bibliography
Archives and Officesp. 219
Published Worksp. 220
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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