Catalogue


Structures of feeling in seventeenth-century cultural expression /
edited by Susan McClary.
imprint
Toronto : Published by the University of Toronto Press in association with the UCLA Center for Seventeenth- and Eighteenth-Century Studies and the William Andrews Clark Memorial Library, c2013.
description
xiii, 382 p. : ill.
ISBN
9781442640627 :
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
series title
imprint
Toronto : Published by the University of Toronto Press in association with the UCLA Center for Seventeenth- and Eighteenth-Century Studies and the William Andrews Clark Memorial Library, c2013.
isbn
9781442640627 :
general note
Essays based on papers presented at four international conferences held at the UCLA Clark Library, 2005.
Series statement from jacket.
catalogue key
8853881
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Main Description
Between the waning of the Renaissance and the beginning of the Enlightenment, many fundamental aspects of human behaviour - from expressions of gender to the experience of time - underwent radical changes. While some of these transformations were recorded in words, others have survived in non-verbal cultural media, notably the visual arts, poetry, theatre, music, and dance. Structures of Feeling in Seventeenth-Century Cultural Expressionexplores how artists made use of these various cultural forms to grapple with human values in the increasingly heterodox world of the 1600s. Essays from prominent historians, musicologists, and art critics examine methods of non-verbal cultural expression through the broad themes of time, motion, the body, and global relations. Together, they show that seventeenth-century cultural expression was more than just an embryonic stage within Western artistic development. Instead, the contributors argue that this period marks some of the most profound changes in European subjectivities.
Main Description
Structures of Feeling in Seventeenth-Century Cultural Expression explores how artists made use of various cultural forms - notably the visual arts, poetry, theatre, music, and dance - to grapple with human values in the increasingly heterodox world of the 1600s.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Illustrationsp. xi
Introduction: On Bodies, Affects, and Cultural Identities in the Seventeenth Centuryp. 3
The Science of Affect
Disciplining Feeling: The Seventeenth-Century Idea of a Mathematical Theory of the Emotionsp. 19
Clockwork or Musical Instrument? Some English Theories of Mind-Body Interaction before and after Descartesp. 35
The Sound World of Father Mersennep. 60
Colonial Extensions
'Voluntary Subjection': France's Theory of Colonization/Culture in the Seventeenth Centuryp. 93
Fear of Singing (Episodes from Early Latin America)p. 117
The Illicit Voice of Prophecyp. 147
The Politics of Opera
Daphne's Dilemma: Desire as Metamorphosis in Early Modern Operap. 175
A Viceroy behind the Scenes: Opera, Production, Politics, and Financing in 1680s Naplesp. 209
Baroque Bodies
Crashaw and the Metaphysical Shudder; Or, How to Do Things with Tearsp. 253
'Law's Bloody Inflictions': Judicial Wounding and Resistance in Seventeenth-Century Englandp. 272
Excursions to See 'Monsters': Odd Bodies and Itineraries of Knowledge in the Seventeenth Centuryp. 296
Toward a History of Time and Subjectivity
Temporality and Ideology: Qualities of Motion in Seventeenth-Century French Musicp. 315
Temporal Interventions: Music, Modernity, and the Presentation of the Selfp. 338
Contributorsp. 361
Indexp. 363
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem