Catalogue


Zapata lives! [electronic resource] : histories and cultural politics in southern Mexico /
Lynn Stephen.
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c2002.
description
xlv, 400 p. : ill., maps.
ISBN
0520230523 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
added author
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c2002.
isbn
0520230523 (alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8849122
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 355-377) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Michael Kearney University of California, Riverside Lynn Stephen is Professor of Anthropology at the University of Oregon
Excerpts
Flap Copy
Zapata Lives! is the first scholarly study to examine contemporary Mexican Zapatismo comparatively, with an eye to regionally varying histories of peasant and indigenous relations to the national state. Analyzing the mosaic of experiences of agrarian reform, in the heartland of the Zapatista rebellion in eastern Chiapas and in central Oaxaca, Stephen clarifies how Zapata arose, and lives on, as a powerful symbol for the equity and social justice that men and women of Mexico's rural south demand of their government.--George Collier, author of Basta! Land and the Zapatista Rebellion in Chiapas Lynn Stephen's new book on Zapatismo is her best work to date and will win her great acclaim. It is a fascinating and highly accessible study of the interplay of state ideology, political economy, and local responses in Oaxaca and Chiapas, Mexico. Many scholars and students have been waiting for a richer contextualization of the Zapatista movement, and Stephen offers very effective tactics to frame such a study.--Kay Warren, author of Indigenous Movements and Their Critics Zapata Lives! is a testimony to the struggles and tentative hopes of indigenous populations in Mexico. It is also a testimony to the remarkable synergy that emerges from conjoining the ethnographic encounter with political events in their contested historical contexts. Articulate and compassionate herself, Stephen introduces her informants as the most articulate exponents of their own views and urges us to share their passions and perplexities. In short, this is an academically rich work that also engages the sensitivities and imagination of the reader.--Michael Herzfeld, author of Cultural Intimacy Ethnographic in method and encyclopedic in scope, this morally engaged book is indispensable to understanding historic transformations occurring in contemporary Mexico. Through comparative fieldwork in Chiapas and Oaxaca, Stephen reveals local impacts of and responses to the ongoing Zapatista rebellion, recent changes in Mexico's agrarian law, and the imposition of the North American Free Trade Agreement.--Michael Kearney, University of California, Riverside The Chiapas rebellion inspired widespread sympathy in the Mexican countryside, yet few followed the same path. Zapata Lives! unravels this puzzle by comparing agrarian political identities in both insurgent and quiescent rural communities. Stephen deftly explains local identity formation through the lenses of ethnicity, gender and class, as framed by diverse historical legacies of state-community relations. In the process, she breaks important ground in engaged anthropology, redefining what it means to be in the field.--Jonathan Fox, University of California, Santa Cruz
Flap Copy
Zapata Lives!is the first scholarly study to examine contemporary Mexican Zapatismo comparatively, with an eye to regionally varying histories of peasant and indigenous relations to the national state. Analyzing the mosaic of experiences of agrarian reform, in the heartland of the Zapatista rebellion in eastern Chiapas and in central Oaxaca, Stephen clarifies how Zapata arose, and lives on, as a powerful symbol for the equity and social justice that men and women of Mexico's rural south demand of their government.--George Collier, author ofBasta! Land and the Zapatista Rebellion in Chiapas Lynn Stephen's new book on Zapatismo is her best work to date and will win her great acclaim. It is a fascinating and highly accessible study of the interplay of state ideology, political economy, and local responses in Oaxaca and Chiapas, Mexico. Many scholars and students have been waiting for a richer contextualization of the Zapatista movement, and Stephen offers very effective tactics to frame such a study.--Kay Warren, author ofIndigenous Movements and Their Critics Zapata Lives!is a testimony to the struggles and tentative hopes of indigenous populations in Mexico. It is also a testimony to the remarkable synergy that emerges from conjoining the ethnographic encounter with political events in their contested historical contexts. Articulate and compassionate herself, Stephen introduces her informants as the most articulate exponents of their own views and urges us to share their passions and perplexities. In short, this is an academically rich work that also engages the sensitivities and imagination of the reader.--Michael Herzfeld, author ofCultural Intimacy Ethnographic in method and encyclopedic in scope, this morally engaged book is indispensable to understanding historic transformations occurring in contemporary Mexico. Through comparative fieldwork in Chiapas and Oaxaca, Stephen reveals local impacts of and responses to the ongoing Zapatista rebellion, recent changes in Mexico's agrarian law, and the imposition of the North American Free Trade Agreement.--Michael Kearney, University of California, Riverside The Chiapas rebellion inspired widespread sympathy in the Mexican countryside, yet few followed the same path. Zapata Lives! unravels this puzzle by comparing agrarian political identities in both insurgent and quiescent rural communities. Stephen deftly explains local identity formation through the lenses of ethnicity, gender and class, as framed by diverse historical legacies of state-community relations. In the process, she breaks important ground in engaged anthropology, redefining what it means to be in the field.--Jonathan Fox, University of California, Santa Cruz
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2002-08-01:
In this large and rambling book, activist anthropologist Stephen (Univ. of Oregon) examines how a symbol broadcast by the Mexican government resonated differently across rural Mexico. For some Mexicans, revolutionary Emiliano Zapata and his struggle for agrarian justice came to symbolize the beneficent alliance of peasant and government. For others, that same Zapata highlighted an unfinished struggle for land and equity. When armed rebellion erupted in 1994, rebels marched under the banner of the Emiliano Zapata Army of National Liberation. Rural Mexico is not homogeneous, and the author's efforts to demonstrate that simple fact are ungainly. But Stephen had other purposes; she wished to serve as a committed witness to Mexican efforts to create a more equitable and just nation. Therein lies the book's strengths--its exploration of the changing rights and roles of women in rebel territory in Chiapas, its expose of the increasing militarization of the Mexican countryside, and the author's own observations and interviews conducted in rebel territory while she labored as a sympathetic international observer in Mexico. Readers may find her discussions of a number of pressing contemporary political issues in Mexico of interest. All levels and collections. P. R. Sullivan independent scholar
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, August 2002
Choice, September 2002
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Zapata Lives! illuminates the meanings of Emiliano Zapata for rural Mexicans, documents the rise of the Zapatista rebellion in Chiapas, and suggests how the rebellion was interpreted in other parts of Mexico, particularly Oaxaca.
Unpaid Annotation
"Zapata Lives! is the first scholarly study to examine contemporary Mexican Zapatismo comparatively, with an eye to regionally varying histories of peasant and indigenous relations to the national state. Analyzing the mosaic of experiences of agrarian reform, in the heartland of the Zapatista rebellion in eastern Chiapas and in central Oaxaca, Stephen clarifies how Zapata arose, and lives on, as a powerful symbol for the equity and social justice that men and women of Mexico's rural south demand of their government.--George Collier, author of "Basta! Land and the Zapatista Rebellion in ChiapasLynn Stephen's new book on Zapatismo is her best work to date and will win her great acclaim. It is a fascinating and highly accessible study of the interplay of state ideology, political economy, and local responses in Oaxaca and Chiapas, Mexico. Many scholars and students have been waiting for a richer contextualization of the Zapatista movement, and Stephen offers very effective tactics to frame such astudy.--Kay Warren, author of "Indigenous Movements and Their Critics"Zapata Lives! is a testimony to the struggles and tentative hopes of indigenous populations in Mexico. It is also a testimony to the remarkable synergy that emerges from conjoining the ethnographic encounter with political events in their contested historical contexts. Articulate and compassionate herself, Stephen introduces her informants as the most articulate exponents of their own views and urges us to share their passions and perplexities. In short, this is an academically rich work that also engages the sensitivities and imagination of the reader.--Michael Herzfeld, author of "Cultural IntimacyEthnographic inmethod and encyclopedic in scope, this morally engaged book is indispensable to understanding historic transformations occurring in contemporary Mexico. Through comparative fieldwork in Chiapas and Oaxaca, Stephen reveals local i
Long Description
This richly detailed study chronicles recent political events in southern Mexico, up to and including the July 2000 election of Vicente Fox. Lynn Stephen focuses on the meaning that Emiliano Zapata, the great symbol of land reform and human rights, has had and now has for rural Mexicans. Stephen documents the rise of the Zapatista rebellion in Chiapas and shows how this rebellion was understood in other parts of Mexico, particularly in Oaxaca, giving a vivid sense of rural life in southern Mexico. Illuminating the cultural dimensions of these political events, she shows how indigenous Mexicans and others fashioned their own responses to neoliberal economic policy, which ended land reform, encouraged privatization, and has resulted in increasing socioeconomic stratification in Mexico. Mixing original ethnographic material drawn from years of fieldwork in Mexico with historical material from a variety of sources, Stephen shows how activists have appropriated symbols of the revolution to build the contemporary political movement. Her wide-ranging narrative touches on the history of land tenure, racism, gender issues in the Zapatista movement, local political culture, the Zapatista uprising of the 1990s and its aftermath, and more. A significant addition to our knowledge of social change in contemporary Mexico,Zapata Lives!also offers readers a model for engaged, activist anthropology.
Main Description
This richly detailed study chronicles recent political events in southern Mexico, up to and including the July 2000 election of Vicente Fox. Lynn Stephen focuses on the meaning that Emiliano Zapata, the great symbol of land reform and human rights, has had and now has for rural Mexicans. Stephen documents the rise of the Zapatista rebellion in Chiapas and shows how this rebellion was understood in other parts of Mexico, particularly in Oaxaca, giving a vivid sense of rural life in southern Mexico. Illuminating the cultural dimensions of these political events, she shows how indigenous Mexicans and others fashioned their own responses to neoliberal economic policy, which ended land reform, encouraged privatization, and has resulted in increasing socioeconomic stratification in Mexico. Mixing original ethnographic material drawn from years of fieldwork in Mexico with historical material from a variety of sources, Stephen shows how activists have appropriated symbols of the revolution to build the contemporary political movement. Her wide-ranging narrative touches on the history of land tenure, racism, gender issues in the Zapatista movement, local political culture, the Zapatista uprising of the 1990s and its aftermath, and more. A significant addition to our knowledge of social change in contemporary Mexico, Zapata Lives! also offers readers a model for engaged, activist anthropology.
Table of Contents
List of Maps, Illustrations, and Tablesp. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Acronyms and Abbreviationsp. xiv
Prefacep. xxv
The Political and Historical Contexts of Zapatismo
Introduction: The "Fields" of Anthropology, Human Rights, and Contemporary Zapatismop. 3
Government Construction and Reappropriation of Emiliano Zapatap. 33
Ethnic and Racial Categories in Mexican Historyp. 83
Zapatismo in Eastern Chiapas
The Historical Roots of Indigenous Struggle in Chiapasp. 91
The New Zapatismo in the Lacandon Junglep. 103
Zapata Vive! Lacandon Zapatismo and Its Translation to Larger Mexicop. 147
Conversations with Zapatistas: The Revolutionary Law of Women and Military Occupationp. 176
New and Old Zapatismo in Oaxaca
The Historical Roots of Land Conflict and Organizing in Oaxacap. 219
The Story of Santa Maria del Tule: Zapata, Cardenas, and "Good Guy" Officialsp. 240
The Formation of the Ejido of Union Zapatap. 267
Contradictions of Zapatismo in Rural Oaxacap. 287
Conclusion: Reclaiming the Mexican Nation for the Poor and the Indigenous Southp. 316
Notesp. 345
Referencesp. 355
Indexp. 379
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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