Catalogue


What price better health? [electronic resource] : hazards of the research imperative /
Daniel Callahan.
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press ; New York : Milbank Memorial Fund, c2003.
description
xii, 329 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0520227719 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
added author
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press ; New York : Milbank Memorial Fund, c2003.
isbn
0520227719 (alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
The emergence and growth of the research imperative? -- Protecting the integrity of science -- Is research a moral obligation? -- Curing the sick, helping the suffering, enhancing the well -- Assessing risks and benefits -- Using humans for research -- Pluralism, balance, and controversy -- Doing good and doing well -- Advocacy and priorities for research -- Research and the public interest.
catalogue key
8848747
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"This book is of special importance. Callahan brings together in one volume the history of biomedical research in the U.S., a discussion of the goals, process, and conduct of biomedical research, and a compelling proposal for reforming the balance between research and public health policies."--Dorothy Rice, coauthor of The Dynamics of Disability: Measuring and Monitoring Disability for Social Security Programs "One of the foremost bioethicists of our age questions the central dogmas of biomedical research, namely that more science necessarily delivers a better life and that aging is a preventable disease. Callahan brilliantly deconstructs the myths behind medical research; his arguments and socratic inquiry will shake your complacency as it did my own."--Sheldon Krimsky, author of Science in the Private Interest "This book is the fruit of many years of reflection by one who has been at the center of the bioethics movement in this country. Managing to be simultaneously readable and knowledgeable, Callahan has also not been afraid to be provocative. His book will be required reading for all who want to ponder the ethics of research."--Gilbert Meilaender, author of Body, Soul and Bioethics
Flap Copy
"This book is of special importance. Callahan brings together in one volume the history of biomedical research in the U.S., a discussion of the goals, process, and conduct of biomedical research, and a compelling proposal for reforming the balance between research and public health policies."--Dorothy Rice, coauthor ofThe Dynamics of Disability: Measuring and Monitoring Disability for Social Security Programs "One of the foremost bioethicists of our age questions the central dogmas of biomedical research, namely that more science necessarily delivers a better life and that aging is a preventable disease. Callahan brilliantly deconstructs the myths behind medical research; his arguments and socratic inquiry will shake your complacency as it did my own."--Sheldon Krimsky, author ofScience in the Private Interest "This book is the fruit of many years of reflection by one who has been at the center of the bioethics movement in this country. Managing to be simultaneously readable and knowledgeable, Callahan has also not been afraid to be provocative. His book will be required reading for all who want to ponder the ethics of research."--Gilbert Meilaender, author ofBody, Soul and Bioethics
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2004-04-01:
Callahan (director, International Program, Hastings Center) is concerned with the burgeoning amounts of money that NIH has spent for biomedical research that lacks safe, beneficial, sustainable, or affordable results and that may be hazardous to human subjects. Acknowledging that public enthusiasm and culturally based attitudes have contributed to a "research imperative," he addresses the pharmaceutical industry in particular. Among the biomedical ethical dilemmas he discusses are those raised by breeding, cloning, use of fetal tissue and embryos, procreation enhancement, eugenics, and the Human Genome Project. Despite the existence of entities such as institutional review boards and the government's Office of Research Integrity, conflicts of interest and exaggerations of the value of research findings occur. Callahan suggests that overreaching for success has resulted in too little resistance to for-profit research. He argues for values higher than the simple extension of scientific knowledge: "The approach to medical research I have been urging comes to this; it is focused on a population's health needs, subdivided into the needs of different age groups, and requires an effort to coordinate socioeconomic research and social programs to be fully efficacious." This approach contrasts with a research policy focused on disease constituencies and with the current "hodgepodge of health care provisions." ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Graduate students and above. M. K. Snooks University of Houston--Clear Lake
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, April 2004
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Summaries
Long Description
The idea that we have an unlimited moral imperative to pursue medical research is deeply rooted in American society and medicine. In this provocative work, Daniel Callahan exposes the ways in which such a seemingly high and humane ideal can be corrupted and distorted into a harmful practice. Medical research, with its power to attract money and political support, and its promise of cures for a wide range of medical burdens, has good and bad sides--which are often indistinguishable. InWhat Price Better Health?,Callahan teases out the distinctions and differences, revealing the difficulties that result when the research imperative is suffused with excessive zeal, adulterated by the profit motive, or used to justify cutting moral corners. Exploring the National Institutes of Health's annual budget, the inflated estimates of health care cost savings that result from research, the high prices charged by drug companies, the use and misuse of human subjects for medical testing, and the controversies surrounding human cloning and stem cell research, Callahan clarifies the fine line between doing good and doing harm in the name of medical progress. His work shows that medical research must be understood in light of other social and economic needs and how even the research imperative, dedicated to the highest human good, has its limits.
Main Description
The idea that we have an unlimited moral imperative to pursue medical research is deeply rooted in American society and medicine. In this provocative work, Daniel Callahan exposes the ways in which such a seemingly high and humane ideal can be corrupted and distorted into a harmful practice. Medical research, with its power to attract money and political support, and its promise of cures for a wide range of medical burdens, has good and bad sides--which are often indistinguishable. In What Price Better Health?, Callahan teases out the distinctions and differences, revealing the difficulties that result when the research imperative is suffused with excessive zeal, adulterated by the profit motive, or used to justify cutting moral corners. Exploring the National Institutes of Health's annual budget, the inflated estimates of health care cost savings that result from research, the high prices charged by drug companies, the use and misuse of human subjects for medical testing, and the controversies surrounding human cloning and stem cell research, Callahan clarifies the fine line between doing good and doing harm in the name of medical progress. His work shows that medical research must be understood in light of other social and economic needs and how even the research imperative, dedicated to the highest human good, has its limits.
Table of Contents
Foreword
Acknowledgments
Introduction: An Imperative?
The Emergence and Growth of the Research Imperative
Protecting the Integrity of Science
Is Research a Moral Obligation?
Curing the Sick, Helping the Suffering, Enhancing the Well
Assessing Risks and Benefits
Using Humans for Research
Pluralism, Balance, and Controversy
Doing Good and Doing Well
Advocacy and Priorities for Research
Research and the Public Interest
Notes
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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