Catalogue


Subverting exclusion [electronic resource] : transpacific encounters with race, caste, and borders, 1885-1928 /
Andrea Geiger.
imprint
New Haven : Yale University Press, c2011.
description
xiv, 286 p. : ill., map ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0300169639 (alk. paper), 9780300169638 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
New Haven : Yale University Press, c2011.
isbn
0300169639 (alk. paper)
9780300169638 (alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
Caste, status, and mibun -- Emigration from Meiji Japan -- Negotiating status and contesting race in North America -- Confronting White racism -- The U.S.-Canada border -- The U.S.-Mexico border -- Debating the contours of citizenship -- Reframing community and policing marriage -- The rhetoric of homogeneity -- Conclusion: Refracting difference -- Timeline: Key moments in Japanese immigrants' history in North America to 1928 -- Glossary.
abstract
Concerned with people called variously: eta, burakumin, buraku jumin, buraku people, outcastes, or "the lowest of the low", this book examines how their experience of caste/status-based discrimination in 19th century Japan affected their experience of race-based discrimination in the West of the US and Canada in the 19th and early 20th centuries.
catalogue key
8847615
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
Winner of the 2012 Theodore Saloutos Memorial Book Award sponsored by the Immigration and Ethnic History Society.
"Andrea Geiger's beautifully written narrative deftly describes how Japanese emigrants escaped the stigma of lower-caste status in Tokugawa Japan, only to encounter an even more malignant form of exclusion in the North American West based solely on one's race. An important and absolutely fascinating read."Neil Foley, author of Quest for Equality: The Failed Promise of Black-Brown Solidarity
"Elegantly written and deeply insightful, Geiger deftly combines an understanding of the law and racial formation and has offered a truly transnational history that blends Asian, Asian American, and broader issues of American immigration history."K. Scott Wong, Williams College
"Examining the tangled convergence between North American racial prejudice and the Japanese denigration of outcastes, this book is strikingly innovative and intensely thought-provoking. Andrea Geiger's work sets a model of historical research and analysis practiced as an extraordinaryand courageousart."Patty Limerick, author of The Legacy of Conquest
"Refusing historiographical silences and caricatures of homogeneity and stasis, Subverting Exclusion insists upon the diversity and movement of Japanese migrants in a trans-Pacific, transnational world. In the process, this superbly conceived study succeeds in rendering its subjects as emphatically human." Gary Y. Okihiro, author of Pineapple Culture: A History of the Tropical and Temperate Zones
Winner of the 2011 Association for Asian American Studies Book Award in the History category, given by the Association for Asian American Studies.
Winner of the 2012 Theodore Saloutos Memorial Book Award sponsored by the Agricultural History Society.
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
The Japanese immigrants who arrived in the North American West in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries included individuals with historical ties to Japan's outcaste communities. In the only English-language book on the subject, Andrea Geiger examines the history of these immigrants in the United States and Canada and their encounters with two separate cultures of exclusion, including the notion of outcaste status. Geiger reveals that the experiences of Japanese immigrants in North America were shaped in part by Japan's formal status system, mibunsei , decades after it was formally abolished. The immigrants' understanding of social status as caste-based, however, collided with American and Canadian perceptions of status as primarily race-based. Geiger shows how the lingering influence of Japan's strict status system affected immigrants' perceptions and understandings of race in the North American West in the early twentieth century.
Bowker Data Service Summary
The Japanese immigrants who arrived in the North American West in the late 19th and early 20th centuries included individuals with historical ties to Japan's outcaste communities. Andrea Geiger examines the history of these immigrants in the US and Canada and their encounters with two separate cultures of exclusion.
Library of Congress Summary
Concerned with people called variously: eta, burakumin, buraku jumin, buraku people, outcastes, or "the lowest of the low", this book examines how their experience of caste/status-based discrimination in 19th century Japan affected their experience of race-based discrimination in the West of the US and Canada in the 19th and early 20th centuries.
Main Description
The Japanese immigrants who arrived in the North American West in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries included people with historical ties to Japan's outcaste communities. In the only English-language book on the subject, Andrea Geiger examines the history of these and other Japanese immigrants in the United States and Canada and their encounters with two separate cultures of exclusion, one based in caste and the other in race. Geiger reveals that the experiences of Japanese immigrants in North America were shaped in part by attitudes rooted in Japan's formal status system, mibunsei, decades after it was formally abolished. In the North American West, however, the immigrants' understanding of social status as caste-based collided with American and Canadian perceptions of status as primarily race-based. Geiger shows how the lingering influence of Japan's strict status system affected immigrants' perceptions and understandings of race in North America and informed their strategic responses to two increasingly complex systems of race-based exclusionary law and policy.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Note on Terminologyp. xiii
Introductionp. 1
Caste, Status, Mibunp. 15
Emigration from Meiji Japanp. 36
Negotiating Status and Contesting Race in North Americap. 53
Confronting White Racismp. 72
The U.S.-Canada Borderp. 99
The U.S.-Mexico Borderp. 124
Debating the Contours of Citizenshipp. 138
Reframing Community and Policing Marriagep. 161
The Rhetoric of Homogeneityp. 180
Conclusion; Refracting Differencep. 189
Timeline: Key Moments in Japanese Immigration History in North America to 1928p. 196
Notesp. 199
Glossary of selected termsp. 277
Indexp. 279
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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