Catalogue


The state of speech [electronic resource] : rhetoric and political thought in Ancient Rome /
Joy Connolly.
imprint
Princeton, N.J. : Princeton University Press, c2007.
description
xii, 304 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0691123640 (hbk. : alk. paper), 9780691123646 (hbk. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Princeton, N.J. : Princeton University Press, c2007.
isbn
0691123640 (hbk. : alk. paper)
9780691123646 (hbk. : alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
Rhetoric and political thought -- Founding the state of speech -- Naturalized citizens -- The body politic -- The aesthetics of virtue -- Republican theater -- Imperial reenactments -- The Ciceronian citizen in a global world.
catalogue key
8847454
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [275-293]) and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"This is a brilliant exploration of how rhetoric works as a means of fashioning political awareness. Showing an enviable command of political theory from Plato to Habermas and a sure grasp of Roman political practice, Connolly has written a seminal work that opens up a rich array of new insights by breaking up and infusing new life into traditional distinctions. With her own remarkable powers of rhetorical persuasion, Connolly seduces the reader into entering the complex negotiations of Roman political life."--Elizabeth Asmis, University of Chicago"This is an admirable book in every way: in its ambition to read Roman rhetorical thought seriously, as political thought, in the breadth of its reference and the depth of its learning, and in its desire to connect the "mores" of the Romans with our own."--Robert Kaster, Princeton University
Flap Copy
"This is a brilliant exploration of how rhetoric works as a means of fashioning political awareness. Showing an enviable command of political theory from Plato to Habermas and a sure grasp of Roman political practice, Connolly has written a seminal work that opens up a rich array of new insights by breaking up and infusing new life into traditional distinctions. With her own remarkable powers of rhetorical persuasion, Connolly seduces the reader into entering the complex negotiations of Roman political life."-- Elizabeth Asmis, University of Chicago "This is an admirable book in every way: in its ambition to read Roman rhetorical thought seriously, as political thought, in the breadth of its reference and the depth of its learning, and in its desire to connect the mores of the Romans with our own."-- Robert Kaster, Princeton University
Flap Copy
"This is a brilliant exploration of how rhetoric works as a means of fashioning political awareness. Showing an enviable command of political theory from Plato to Habermas and a sure grasp of Roman political practice, Connolly has written a seminal work that opens up a rich array of new insights by breaking up and infusing new life into traditional distinctions. With her own remarkable powers of rhetorical persuasion, Connolly seduces the reader into entering the complex negotiations of Roman political life."--Elizabeth Asmis, University of Chicago "This is an admirable book in every way: in its ambition to read Roman rhetorical thought seriously, as political thought, in the breadth of its reference and the depth of its learning, and in its desire to connect the mores of the Romans with our own."--Robert Kaster, Princeton University
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2008-06-01:
Connolly (NYU) has applied her impressive theoretical and methodological strengths to this exciting examination of Roman rhetorical and political theory. Delving deeply into Cicero's works, Connolly considers the relationship between Cicero's vision of the Republic and of the Republican citizen. She proposes that rhetoric provides a crucial lens through which to understand Cicero and Roman politics. Connolly commands a wide range of resources to undergird her argument, including the traditions of Greek rhetoric as well as post-classical authors such as Gramsci, Foucault, and Habermas. In keeping with her scholarship to date, Connolly incorporates into this book analyses of education, class distinctions, and gender politics as they relate to the role of rhetoric in Rome. She observes that scholars have returned to studying Cicero not only for his perspective on the political mayhem of the 60s to 40s BCE, but for his rhetorical and political theory and its contribution to understanding Roman ideology and the establishment of self-identity. Chapters include the rhetoric of equality, the aesthetics of virtue, Catullus' republican rhetoric, women and speech, and Republican theater. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. J. de Luce Miami University
Reviews
Review Quotes
Connolly has applied her impressive theoretical and methodological strengths to this exciting examination of Roman rhetoric and political theory. Delving deeply into Cicero's works, Connolly considers the relationship between Cicero's vision of the Republic and of the Republican citizen. She proposes that rhetoric provides a crucial lens through which to understand Cicero and Roman politics. Connolly commands a wide range of resources to undergird her argument, including the traditions of Greek rhetoric as well as post-classical authors such as Gramsci, Foucault, and Habermas. In keeping with her scholarship to date, Connolly incorporates into this book analyses of education, class distinctions, and gender politics as they relate to the role of rhetoric in Rome.
Connolly has applied her impressive theoretical and methodological strengths to this exciting examination of Roman rhetoric and political theory. Delving deeply into Cicero's works, Connolly considers the relationship between Cicero's vision of the Republic and of the Republican citizen. She proposes that rhetoric provides a crucial lens through which to understand Cicero and Roman politics. Connolly commands a wide range of resources to undergird her argument, including the traditions of Greek rhetoric as well as post-classical authors such as Gramsci, Foucault, and Habermas. In keeping with her scholarship to date, Connolly incorporates into this book analyses of education, class distinctions, and gender politics as they relate to the role of rhetoric in Rome. -- de Luce, Miami University, for "Choice
I have learned much from this book, and it is certain to continue to stimulate my thinking throughout this important election year in the United States. . . . The need for a political community that depends upon mutual trust between leaders and led has received here an eloquent expression.
"I have learned much from this book, and it is certain to continue to stimulate my thinking throughout this important election year in the United States. . . . The need for a political community that depends upon mutual trust between leaders and led has received here an eloquent expression."-- Anthony Corbeill, Rhetorical Review
I have learned much from this book, and it is certain to continue to stimulate my thinking throughout this important election year in the United States. . . . The need for a political community that depends upon mutual trust between leaders and led has received here an eloquent expression. -- Anthony Corbeill, Rhetorical Review
This is, in the best sense, a very American book--thoughtful, historically aware, yet infused with optimism and vigor and deep republican ideals. . . . Against the current American political scene, its conclusions read as nothing short of prescient.
"This is, in the best sense, a very American book--thoughtful, historically aware, yet infused with optimism and vigor and deep republican ideals. . . . Against the current American political scene, its conclusions read as nothing short of prescient."-- Catherine Conybeare, Bryn Mawr Classical Review
This is, in the best sense, a very American book--thoughtful, historically aware, yet infused with optimism and vigor and deep republican ideals. . . . Against the current American political scene, its conclusions read as nothing short of prescient. -- Catherine Conybeare, Bryn Mawr Classical Review
With a comprehensive grasp of political theory and literary criticism, Connolly creates a compelling case for using classical rhetorical texts as a lens for viewing political thought.
"With a comprehensive grasp of political theory and literary criticism, Connolly creates a compelling case for using classical rhetorical texts as a lens for viewing political thought."-- Laurie Wilson, Journal of Roman Studies
With a comprehensive grasp of political theory and literary criticism, Connolly creates a compelling case for using classical rhetorical texts as a lens for viewing political thought. -- Laurie Wilson, Journal of Roman Studies
This is a brilliant exploration of how rhetoric works as a means of fashioning political awareness. Showing an enviable command of political theory from Plato to Habermas and a sure grasp of Roman political practice, Connolly has written a seminal work that opens up a rich array of new insights by breaking up and infusing new life into traditional distinctions. With her own remarkable powers of rhetorical persuasion, Connolly seduces the reader into entering the complex negotiations of Roman political life.
This is an admirable book in every way: in its ambition to read Roman rhetorical thought seriously, as political thought, in the breadth of its reference and the depth of its learning, and in its desire to connect themoresof the Romans with our own.
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, June 2008
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Reading Roman rhetorical writing as a mode of political thought, this text focuses on Rome's greatest practitioner and theorist of public speech, Cicero.
Main Description
Rhetorical theory, the core of Roman education, taught rules of public speaking that are still influential today. But Roman rhetoric has long been regarded as having little important to say about political ideas. The State of Speech presents a forceful challenge to this view. The first book to read Roman rhetorical writing as a mode of political thought, it focuses on Rome's greatest practitioner and theorist of public speech, Cicero. Through new readings of his dialogues and treatises, Joy Connolly shows how Cicero's treatment of the Greek rhetorical tradition's central questions is shaped by his ideal of the republic and the citizen. Rhetoric, Connolly argues, sheds new light on Cicero's deepest political preoccupations: the formation of individual and communal identity, the communicative role of the body, and the "unmanly" aspects of politics, especially civility and compromise. Transcending traditional lines between rhetorical and political theory, The State of Speech is a major contribution to the current debate over the role of public speech in Roman politics. Instead of a conventional, top-down model of power, it sketches a dynamic model of authority and consent enacted through oratorical performance and examines how oratory modeled an ethics of citizenship for the masses as well as the elite. It explains how imperial Roman rhetoricians reshaped Cicero's ideal republican citizen to meet the new political conditions of autocracy, and defends Ciceronian thought as a resource for contemporary democracy.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Abbreviations usedp. xiii
Introduction: Rhetoric and political thoughtp. 1
Founding the state of speechp. 23
Politics in publicp. 30
Ideology and powerp. 38
Expressions of traditional authorityp. 47
The rhetoric of equalityp. 56
The rationalized republicp. 65
Naturalized citizensp. 77
The nature of republicsp. 82
Introducing the problem: The Ciceronian prefacep. 89
Rome, naturallyp. 104
Hybridityp. 113
The body politicp. 118
The problem with philosophersp. 121
The corporeal citizenp. 130
A theory of political communicationp. 137
An alternative history of the selfp. 148
Fragilityp. 151
The aesthetics of virtuep. 158
The problem of libertyp. 158
The republic of passionsp. 163
Decorum: Enactment of civic lovep. 169
Catullus's republican rhetoricp. 175
Oratory and liberty, decorum and consentp. 185
Falling in love with the lawp. 191
Republican theaterp. 198
Being and seemingp. 200
The civic stagep. 211
Women and speechp. 214
The best oratorp. 223
The terrors of collectivityp. 231
Imperial reenactmentsp. 237
Replay and parodyp. 239
Reading resistance in Augustan declamationp. 242
Quintilian: A republican education for autocracyp. 254
Conclusion: The Ciceronian citizen in a global worldp. 262
Bibliographyp. 275
Ancient sourcesp. 293
Indexp. 295
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem