Catalogue


The spectacle of intimacy [electronic resource] : a public life for the Victorian family /
Karen Chase and Michael Levenson.
imprint
Princeton, N.J. : Princeton University Press, c2000.
description
viii, 250 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0691006687 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
series title
imprint
Princeton, N.J. : Princeton University Press, c2000.
isbn
0691006687 (cloth : alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8847108
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"A major, often dazzling work of fascinating implications and interest. Scholars of such diverse subjects as Dickens, Tennyson, Victorian sensation fiction, the Divorce Bill of the 1850s, Lord Melbourne, Victorian feminism, the history of sexual scandal, or changing ideas of Empire will want and need to consult this book. Students of epistemes, eras, and broad cultural phenomena will also have to reckon with it. Written with clarity and wit,The Spectacle of Intimacyis a pleasure as well as an intellectual boon to read."--Robert M. Polhemus, Stanford University "The Spectacle of Intimacyoffers wonderfully intelligent and vivacious literary and cultural analyses of domesticity in Victorian Britain. It approaches its subject through a broad array of sources and engages those materials with great canniness, cogency, subtlety, and wit. Any reader interested in Victorian Britain will want to read this book."--James Eli Adams, Indiana University "An important study. This is a major work in Victorian and nineteenth-century scholarship. It functions both as a synthesis of cultural material and as an analysis of particular subjects. It is also a pleasure to read and a scholarly and intellectual boon to read clear, lucid, witty, and expert prose by Chase and Levenson, it has point, simplicity, and elegance."--Robert Polhemus,Novel: A Forum on Fiction
Flap Copy
"A major, often dazzling work of fascinating implications and interest. Scholars of such diverse subjects as Dickens, Tennyson, Victorian sensation fiction, the Divorce Bill of the 1850s, Lord Melbourne, Victorian feminism, the history of sexual scandal, or changing ideas of Empire will want and need to consult this book. Students of epistemes, eras, and broad cultural phenomena will also have to reckon with it. Written with clarity and wit, The Spectacle of Intimacy is a pleasure as well as an intellectual boon to read."-- Robert M. Polhemus, Stanford University " The Spectacle of Intimacy offers wonderfully intelligent and vivacious literary and cultural analyses of domesticity in Victorian Britain. It approaches its subject through a broad array of sources and engages those materials with great canniness, cogency, subtlety, and wit. Any reader interested in Victorian Britain will want to read this book."-- James Eli Adams, Indiana University "An important study. This is a major work in Victorian and nineteenth-century scholarship. It functions both as a synthesis of cultural material and as an analysis of particular subjects. It is also a pleasure to read and a scholarly and intellectual boon to read clear, lucid, witty, and expert prose by Chase and Levenson, it has point, simplicity, and elegance."-- Robert Polhemus, Novel: A Forum on Fiction
Flap Copy
"A major, often dazzling work of fascinating implications and interest. Scholars of such diverse subjects as Dickens, Tennyson, Victorian sensation fiction, the Divorce Bill of the 1850s, Lord Melbourne, Victorian feminism, the history of sexual scandal, or changing ideas of Empire will want and need to consult this book. Students of epistemes, eras, and broad cultural phenomena will also have to reckon with it. Written with clarity and wit, The Spectacle of Intimacy is a pleasure as well as an intellectual boon to read."--Robert M. Polhemus, Stanford University " The Spectacle of Intimacy offers wonderfully intelligent and vivacious literary and cultural analyses of domesticity in Victorian Britain. It approaches its subject through a broad array of sources and engages those materials with great canniness, cogency, subtlety, and wit. Any reader interested in Victorian Britain will want to read this book."--James Eli Adams, Indiana University "An important study. This is a major work in Victorian and nineteenth-century scholarship. It functions both as a synthesis of cultural material and as an analysis of particular subjects. It is also a pleasure to read and a scholarly and intellectual boon to read clear, lucid, witty, and expert prose by Chase and Levenson, it has point, simplicity, and elegance."--Robert Polhemus, Novel: A Forum on Fiction
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2000-11-01:
A must-read study of Victorian domesticity and its eruptions and discontents, this book takes its place next to excellent recent works that destabilize the boundaries of the domestic, works such as Monica Cohen's Professional Domesticity in the Victorian Novel: Women, Work and Home (CH, Nov'98) and Sharon Marcus's Apartment Stories: City and Home in Nineteenth-Century Paris and London (CH, Jul'99). In each of the ten chapters, Chase and Levenson (both Univ. of Virginia) study domestic space and ideology from a compelling angle that is not only full of interest in itself but suggestive of further research. The authors treat subjects such as Queen Victoria's "Bedchamber Crisis," Tennyson's Princess, the fad of bloomerism, and Dickens's household idyll with intelligent commentary and historical context. Class and gender boundaries are given regular scrutiny, although Chase and Levenson have no particular theoretical axe to grind. All the readings are original, but the work on Victorian architecture--on Victorian walls and on Robert Kerr's The Gentleman's House (1864)--promises especially new and fascinating paths of research into Victorian culture. The only surprise for this reviewer was that in such a model of interdisciplinary study, and among such a varied wealth of topics, there are no examples from Victorian spectacle or theater. All academic collections. S. C. Dillon; Bates College
Reviews
Review Quotes
In readings that diplomatically maintain alliances among literature, politics, the law and social history, Chase and Levenson disclose a complex economy of public and private that transversed Victorian life. No separate spheres here; this is first-rate interdisciplinary scholarship.
"In readings that diplomatically maintain alliances among literature, politics, the law and social history, Chase and Levenson disclose a complex economy of public and private that transversed Victorian life. No separate spheres here; this is first-rate interdisciplinary scholarship."-- Sarah Churchwell, Times Literary Supplement
In readings that diplomatically maintain alliances among literature, politics, the law and social history, Chase and Levenson disclose a complex economy of public and private that transversed Victorian life. No separate spheres here; this is first-rate interdisciplinary scholarship. -- Sarah Churchwell, Times Literary Supplement
One of Choice 's Outstanding Academic Titles for 2000
A major, often dazzling work of fascinating implications and interest. Scholars of such diverse subjects as Dickens, Tennyson, Victorian sensation fiction, the Divorce Bill of the 1850s, Lord Melbourne, Victorian feminism, the history of sexual scandal, or changing ideas of Empire will want and need to consult this book. Students of epistemes, eras, and broad cultural phenomena will also have to reckon with it. Written with clarity and wit,The Spectacle of Intimacyis a pleasure as well as an intellectual boon to read.
An important study. This is a major work in Victorian and nineteenth-century scholarship. It functions both as a synthesis of cultural material and as an analysis of particular subjects. It is also a pleasure to read and a scholarly and intellectual boon to read clear, lucid, witty, and expert prose by Chase and Levenson, it has point, simplicity, and elegance.
The Spectacle of Intimacyoffers wonderfully intelligent and vivacious literary and cultural analyses of domesticity in Victorian Britain. It approaches its subject through a broad array of sources and engages those materials with great canniness, cogency, subtlety, and wit. Any reader interested in Victorian Britain will want to read this book.
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, November 2000
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Summaries
Main Description
Love of home life, the intimate moments a family peacefully enjoyed in seclusion, had long been considered a hallmark of English character even before the Victorian era. But the Victorians attached unprecedented importance to domesticity, romanticizing the family in every medium from novels to government reports, to the point where actual families felt anxious and the public developed a fierce appetite for scandal. Here Karen Chase and Michael Levenson explore how intimacy became a spectacle and how this paradox energized Victorian culture between 1835 and 1865. They tell a story of a society continually perfecting the forms of private pleasure and yet forever finding its secrets exposed to view. The friction between the two conditions sparks insightful discussions of authority and sentiment, empire and middle-class politics. The book recovers neglected episodes of this mid-century drama: the adultery trial of Caroline Norton and the Prime Minister, Lord Melbourne; the Bedchamber Crisis of the young Queen Victoria; the Bloomer craze of the 1850s; and Robert Kerr's influential treatise, celebrating the ideal of the English Gentleman's House. The literary representation of household life--in Dickens, Tennyson, Ellis, and Oliphant, among others--is placed in relation to such public spectacles as the Deceased Wife's Sister Bill of 1848, the controversy over divorce in the years 1854-1857, and the triumphant return of Florence Nightingale from the Crimea. These colorful incidents create a telling new portrait of Victorian family life, one that demands a fundamental rethinking of the relation between public and private spheres.
Table of Contents
Prefacp. ix
Introductionp. 1
History and Doctrinep. 11
Freedom from Compelled Profession of Belief, Adverse Targeting, and Discriminationp. 35
Conscientious Objection to Military Servicep. 49
Religious Exemptions and Drug Usep. 68
Free Exercise Objections to Educational Requirementsp. 86
Sincerityp. 109
Saying What Counts as Religiousp. 124
Controlled Environments: Military and Prison Lifep. 157
Indirect Impingements: Unemployment Compensationp. 172
Sunday Closing Laws and Sabbatarian Business Ownersp. 184
Government Development of Sacred Propertyp. 192
Difficult Determinations: Burden and Government Interestp. 201
Land Development and Regulationp. 233
Confidential Communications with Clergyp. 246
Settling Disputes over Church Propertyp. 261
Wrongs and Rights of Religious Association: The Limits of Tort Liability for Religious Groups and Their Leadersp. 290
Employment Relations: Ordinary Discrimination and Accommodationp. 326
Employment Relations: Harassmentp. 359
Rights of Religious Associations: Selectivityp. 377
Medical Proceduresp. 396
Child Custodyp. 421
Conclusion (and Introduction)p. 439
Indexp. 445
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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