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Someplace like America [electronic resource] : tales from the new Great Depression /
Dale Maharidge ; photographs by Michael S. Williamson ; with a foreword by Bruce Springsteen.
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c2011.
description
x, 244 p., [72] p. of plates : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
9780520262478 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c2011.
isbn
9780520262478 (cloth : alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8847033
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 234-244).
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"'Someplace Like America' is unrelenting prose, not poetry, but what the book lacks in intimacy it makes up for in breadth and persistence. There's something doggedly heroic in this commitment to one of journalism's least glamorous, least remunerative subjects." --George Packer"These boys saw the floorboards giving out while the rest of America danced in the pig and whistle. Maharidge and Williamson have a document here that may be even more important in a generation than it is today."--Charlie LeDuff, author of Work and Other Sins: Life in New York City and Thereabouts "Through the voices and stories of working-class people, Maharidge and Williamson provide insight into the current situation, reminding us of the history of economic struggle and the importance of understanding our culture from the bottom up." --John Russo, co-author of Steeltown U.S.A.: Work and Memory in Youngstown "This is a deeply felt and beautifully crafted book. Maharidge and Williamson are brave and clear-eyed in chronicling the struggle of America's workers." --Todd DePastino, author of Citizen Hobo: How a Century of Homelessness Shaped America "In this moving and urgent book, Maharidge and Williamson continue to dig through the social wreckage of three decades of economic plunder, courageously documenting the uprooted and displaced, the uncertain and the fearful. Someplace Like America peers into the dark heart of a society that has turned its back on working people--and that may be on the cusp of abandoning its dignity as well. In the smoldering occupational ruins of what once was, Maharidge also manages to find hopeful embers of what might one day be. A disturbing retrospective on twenty-five years of reporting on the long-term dissolution of the American dream." --Jefferson Cowie, Cornell University, author of Stayin' Alive: The 1970s and the Last Days of the Working Class
Flap Copy
"These boys saw the floorboards giving out while the rest of America danced in the pig and whistle. Maharidge and Williamson have a document here that may be even more important in a generation than it is today."- Charlie LeDuff, author of Detroit: An American Autopsy "Through the voices and stories of working-class people, Maharidge and Williamson provide insight into the current situation, reminding us of the history of economic struggle and the importance of understanding our culture from the bottom up." -John Russo, co-author of Steeltown U.S.A.: Work and Memory in Youngstown
Flap Copy
"These boys saw the floorboards giving out while the rest of America danced in the pig and whistle. Maharidge and Williamson have a document here that may be even more important in a generation than it is today."- Charlie LeDuff, author ofDetroit: An American Autopsy "Through the voices and stories of working-class people, Maharidge and Williamson provide insight into the current situation, reminding us of the history of economic struggle and the importance of understanding our culture from the bottom up." -John Russo, co-author ofSteeltown U.S.A.: Work and Memory in Youngstown "This is a deeply felt and beautifully crafted book. Maharidge and Williamson are brave and clear-eyed in chronicling the struggle of America's workers." -Todd DePastino, author ofCitizen Hobo: How a Century of Homelessness Shaped America
Flap Copy
"These boys saw the floorboards giving out while the rest of America danced in the pig and whistle. Maharidge and Williamson have a document here that may be even more important in a generation than it is today."--Charlie LeDuff, author of Detroit: An American Autopsy "Through the voices and stories of working-class people, Maharidge and Williamson provide insight into the current situation, reminding us of the history of economic struggle and the importance of understanding our culture from the bottom up." --John Russo, co-author of Steeltown U.S.A.: Work and Memory in Youngstown "This is a deeply felt and beautifully crafted book. Maharidge and Williamson are brave and clear-eyed in chronicling the struggle of America's workers." --Todd DePastino, author of Citizen Hobo: How a Century of Homelessness Shaped America "In this moving and urgent book, Maharidge and Williamson continue to dig through the social wreckage of three decades of economic plunder, courageously documenting the uprooted and displaced, the uncertain and the fearful. Someplace Like America peers into the dark heart of a society that has turned its back on working people--and that may be on the cusp of abandoning its dignity as well. In the smoldering occupational ruins of what once was, Maharidge also manages to find hopeful embers of what might one day be. A disturbing retrospective on twenty-five years of reporting on the long-term dissolution of the American dream." --Jefferson Cowie, Cornell University, author of Stayin' Alive: The 1970s and the Last Days of the Working Class
Flap Copy
"These boys saw the floorboards giving out while the rest of America danced in the pig and whistle. Maharidge and Williamson have a document here that may be even more important in a generation than it is today."--Charlie LeDuff, author of Work and Other Sins: Life in New York City and Thereabouts "Through the voices and stories of working-class people, Maharidge and Williamson provide insight into the current situation, reminding us of the history of economic struggle and the importance of understanding our culture from the bottom up." --John Russo, co-author of Steeltown U.S.A.: Work and Memory in Youngstown "This is a deeply felt and beautifully crafted book. Maharidge and Williamson are brave and clear-eyed in chronicling the struggle of America's workers." --Todd DePastino, author of Citizen Hobo: How a Century of Homelessness Shaped America "In this moving and urgent book, Maharidge and Williamson continue to dig through the social wreckage of three decades of economic plunder, courageously documenting the uprooted and displaced, the uncertain and the fearful. Someplace Like America peers into the dark heart of a society that has turned its back on working people--and that may be on the cusp of abandoning its dignity as well. In the smoldering occupational ruins of what once was, Maharidge also manages to find hopeful embers of what might one day be. A disturbing retrospective on twenty-five years of reporting on the long-term dissolution of the American dream." --Jefferson Cowie, Cornell University, author of Stayin' Alive: The 1970s and the Last Days of the Working Class
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 2011-04-04:
The Pulitzer Prize-winning author and photographer team Maharidge and Williamson continue their heartfelt chronicle of the travails facing America's poor and homeless in this follow-up to the 1995 Journey to Nowhere. Presenting new stories from today's "Great Depression" and updating their accounts of those impoverished during the recession of the '80s and the supposed boom years of the '90s, this book evokes the Depression-era collaboration of Walker Evans and James Agee. Maharidge delves into causes: the pernicious effects of NAFTA; the hollowing-out of the Rust Belt of the Midwest through deindustrialization; a deeply unbalanced tax system in which the middle classes pay a higher proportion of their income than the wealthy, even in the face of ever-skyrocketing pay for CEOs. However, at the core of the narrative are the individuals who've found themselves dispossessed, hopping freight trains to look for work, waiting in food bank lines, huddling in shanties hand-built from scraps and billboard tarps, and mourning the closings of the steel mills where they once worked. Williamson's gritty photographs-of blind storefronts, abandoned lots choked with weeds, faces lined with dirt and worry, stalwart families, and squatters hunched over meager campfires-are an equally eloquent testimonial. (June) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Deserves high praise . . . . Undeniable relevance to today's American experience."
"Deserves high praise . . . . Undeniable relevance to today's American experience."-- Foreword
"Evokes the Depression-era collaboration of Walker Evans and James Agee."
"Evokes the Depression-era collaboration of Walker Evans and James Agee."-- Publishers Weekly
"Maharidge's straightforward-but-impassioned prose and Williamson's gritty black-and white photographs make you angry. They're an indictment."
"Maharidge's straightforward-but-impassioned prose and Williamson's gritty black-and white photographs make you angry. They're an indictment."-- American Studies
"'Someplace Like America' is unrelenting prose. . . . There's something doggedly heroic in this commitment to one of journalism's least glamorous, least remunerative subjects."
This item was reviewed in:
Publishers Weekly, April 2011
ForeWord Magazine, June 2011
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Dale Maharidge and photographer Michael S. Williamson take us to the working-class heart of America, bringing to life the deepening crisis of poverty and homelessness. They follow the lives of several families over 30 years to present an intimate and devastating portrait of workers going jobless.
Main Description
In Someplace Like America , writer Dale Maharidge and photographer Michael S. Williamson take us to the working-class heart of America, bringing to life--through shoe leather reporting, memoir, vivid stories, stunning photographs, and thoughtful analysis--the deepening crises of poverty and homelessness. The story begins in 1980, when the authors joined forces to cover the America being ignored by the mainstream media--people living on the margins and losing their jobs as a result of deindustrialization. Since then, Maharidge and Williamson have traveled more than half a million miles to investigate the state of the working class (winning a Pulitzer Prize in the process). In Someplace Like America , they follow the lives of several families over the thirty-year span to present an intimate and devastating portrait of workers going jobless. This brilliant and essential study--begun in the trickle-down Reagan years and culminating with the recent banking catastrophe--puts a human face on today's grim economic numbers. It also illuminates the courage and resolve with which the next generation faces the future.
Main Description
InSomeplace Like America, writer Dale Maharidge and photographer Michael S. Williamson take us to the working-class heart of America, bringing to life--through shoe leather reporting, memoir, vivid stories, stunning photographs, and thoughtful analysis--the deepening crises of poverty and homelessness. The story begins in 1980, when the authors joined forces to cover the America being ignored by the mainstream media--people living on the margins and losing their jobs as a result of deindustrialization. Since then, Maharidge and Williamson have traveled more than half a million miles to investigate the state of the working class (winning a Pulitzer Prize in the process). InSomeplace Like America, they follow the lives of several families over the thirty-year span to present an intimate and devastating portrait of workers going jobless. This brilliant and essential study--begun in the trickle-down Reagan years and culminating with the recent banking catastrophe--puts a human face on today's grim economic numbers. It also illuminates the courage and resolve with which the next generation faces the future.

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