Catalogue


Smallpox [electronic resource] : the fight to eradicate a global scourge /
David A. Koplow.
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c2003.
description
ix, 265 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0520237323 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c2003.
isbn
0520237323 (cloth : alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8846928
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 247-258) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
David Koplow is Professor of Law at Georgetown University
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"David Koplow gathers, organizes, and lucidly presents the large body of material from a wide range of disciplines, which bears on the important public policy question whether or not to destroy existing stocks of variola. Engagingly written and accessible to a wide audience, this book will provide both policy makers and citizens with the basic information they need to reach informed and thoughtful judgments on this urgent issue."--John S. Applegate, author ofThe Regulation of Toxic Substances and Hazardous Wastes "David Koplow's book is an important work on a crucial subject. The author brings together an extraordinary amount of information on a vital policy issue. There is nothing available that treats the issue of smallpox with any comparable degree of completeness. Koplow marshals sources from myriad disciplines in a coherent, well-rounded discussion providing a service to the casual as well as the sophisticated reader. This book is a one-stop reference, containing virtually all the information an analyst needs to know."--Barry Kellman, Director of the International Weapons Control Center, DePaul University College of Law.
Flap Copy
"David Koplow gathers, organizes, and lucidly presents the large body of material from a wide range of disciplines, which bears on the important public policy question whether or not to destroy existing stocks of variola. Engagingly written and accessible to a wide audience, this book will provide both policy makers and citizens with the basic information they need to reach informed and thoughtful judgments on this urgent issue."--John S. Applegate, author of The Regulation of Toxic Substances and Hazardous Wastes "David Koplow's book is an important work on a crucial subject. The author brings together an extraordinary amount of information on a vital policy issue. There is nothing available that treats the issue of smallpox with any comparable degree of completeness. Koplow marshals sources from myriad disciplines in a coherent, well-rounded discussion providing a service to the casual as well as the sophisticated reader. This book is a one-stop reference, containing virtually all the information an analyst needs to know."--Barry Kellman, Director of the International Weapons Control Center, DePaul University College of Law.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2003-06-01:
"Smallpox" writes Koplow, "is one of the few potential biological weapons agents that has actually been used for hostile military purposes. The Japanese ... applied it against the Chinese during World War II...." He notes that even if we were to destroy the two known stockpiles of the virus, one American and one Russian, "[v]irologists are like squirrels. A lot of ... stuff goes in deep freezes.... At no time should you ever say ... that there were no smallpox [virus] anywhere." This chilling, well written, thought-provoking book traces the history of the disease, the fight to eradicate it in the wild, and the debate over whether or not to destroy the official depository stockpiles. Koplow argues "no" to destruction, because in the future scientists might learn from the virus. A specialist in arms control and national security, he notes weaknesses in the US's biological warfare defense program and explains how easily bio-attacks might be mounted. "Experts and journalists," he writes, "have already done some of the terrorists' conceptual work ... publishing vivid detailed descriptions of how a secret BW incursion might be effectuated anonymously yet with devastating impact." A book that everyone should read--but not at bedtime! Summing Up: Essential. All levels. I. Richman Pennsylvania State University, Harrisburg Campus
Appeared in Library Journal on 2003-01-15:
Considering the ongoing debate over the final destruction of the smallpox virus, Koplow (law, Georgetown Univ.), a former senior legal adviser on biological weapons to the Pentagon, provides a brief overview of the disease's history, its basic biology, biodiversity concerns, and the role of the World Health Organization in the virus's eradication. He concludes his timely book with a lengthy consideration of the pros and cons of eliminating the smallpox stockpiles. Jonathan Tucker's Scourge offers more in-depth information on the eradication process but does not have the advantage of Koplow's post-9/11 insights. Elizabeth Fenn's Pox Americana is a detailed analysis of the history of smallpox in America, though public libraries may prefer Richard Preston's highly readable but very dramatic Demon in the Freezer. While lay readers may find Koplow's legal writing style and terminology somewhat tedious, an extensive bibliography adds value for academic readers. Recommended for academic, medical, and larger public libraries.-Tina Neville, Univ. of South Florida at St. Petersburg Lib. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 2002-11-18:
In this accessibly written analysis of smallpox policy, Koplow (By Fire and Ice), Georgetown University law professor and one-time deputy counsel at the U.S. Department of State, begins with two major points: smallpox has killed millions of people over the millennia, and the eradication of naturally occurring smallpox from the world has been one of humankind's most amazing success stories. Koplow brings readers up to date on the ongoing debate over whether the last known quantities of the smallpox virus, currently stored in Atlanta, Ga., and Novosibirsk, Russia, should be destroyed. While Koplow adequately presents all sides, his approach, unfortunately, only scratches the surface. (Readers will find a much more comprehensive and informative read in Jonathan Tucker's recent offering, Scourge, or Richard Preston's just released Demon in the Freezer.) Although Koplow asserts that his goal is to help readers decide whether smallpox should be eradicated, some of his chapters-"Environmental Law and Policy" and "World Health Organization" for example-are only marginally relevant to his purpose. (Jan.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Publishers Weekly, November 2002
Booklist, December 2002
Library Journal, January 2003
Choice, June 2003
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
David Koplow, a thirty-year veteran of arms control issues and a senior advisor to the Pentagon on biological warfare issues, explores the history of smallpox and the potential dangers of the virus being used in a terrorist attack.
Main Description
Smallpox is one the world's deadliest diseases and was eradicated from the planet two decades ago. Koplow looks at the long and fascinating history of the smallpox virus, with an informative overview of the political, biological, environmental, medical, and legal issues surrounding the extermination debate.
Long Description
Though smallpox was eradicated from the planet two decades ago, recent terrorist acts have raised the horrific possibility that rogue states, laboratories, or terrorist groups are in possession of secret stockpiles of the virus that causes the disease, and may be preparing to unleash it on target populations. Because it is a far deadlier killer than other biological warfare agents such as anthrax, and because the universal vaccination against smallpox was halted decades ago, a smallpox attack today would be nothing short of catastrophic. This clear, authoritative study looks at the long and fascinating history of the virus, with an informative overview of the political, biological, environmental, medical, and legal issues surrounding the question of whether or not the virus should be exterminated. The only two known samples of the virus are currently stored in Atlanta and Russia. The World Health Organization has repeatedly scheduled their destruction--an action that would rid the planet of all publicly acknowledged smallpox strains forever. Opponents of this plan argue that by destroying these last samples we are denying the possibility that this unique virus could be turned to beneficial purposes in basic scientific research. Others see the stockpile as part of a deterrent against future germ attacks. Proponents of prompt eradication argue that scientists have already learned all they can from this particular virus, and that by destroying the stockpile we are preventing it from ever falling into the wrong hands. As a thirty-year veteran of arms control issues, David Koplow is uniquely suited to provide readers with an informed and well-considered understanding of the complexities involved in the handling of this deadly virus.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Introductionp. 1
The Rise and Fall of Smallpoxp. 9
The Biology of Virusesp. 32
Smallpox as a Biological Weaponp. 58
Environmental Law and Policyp. 104
The World Health Organizationp. 137
The Morality of Extinctionp. 158
The Case for Exterminationp. 179
The Case against Exterminationp. 193
Conclusions and Recommendationsp. 205
Notesp. 229
Select Bibliographyp. 247
Indexp. 259
Table of Contents provided by Rittenhouse. All Rights Reserved.

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