Catalogue


Sick to death and not going to take it anymore! [electronic resource] : reforming health care for the last years of life /
Joanne Lynn.
imprint
Berkeley, Calif. : University of California Press ; New York : Milbank Memorial Fund, c2004.
description
xii, 205 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0520243005 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
added author
imprint
Berkeley, Calif. : University of California Press ; New York : Milbank Memorial Fund, c2004.
isbn
0520243005 (cloth : alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
Just the facts: serious chronic disease in the last phase of life -- Seeing the world differently: ideas to shape reform -- Good care for some people, sometimes -- Surveying the terrain: opportunities and challenges -- Good care for us all: building the care system to count on.
catalogue key
8846792
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 167-189) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Joanne Lynn is Director of The Washington Home Center for Palliative Care Studies, Senior Scientist at the RAND corporation, and President of Americans for Better Care of the Dying.
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"Joanne Lynn is a national treasure--the most articulate, courageous, and scientifically-grounded voice in our nation for the improvement of health care for people approaching the end of life. For the public and professionals alike, her work provides motivation and sound guidance for building the care system we need, a system that we do not yet, by any means, have."--Donald M. Berwick, M.D., M.P.P., President and CEO, The Institute for Healthcare Improvement
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2005-04-01:
Lynn (Washington Home Center for Palliative Care Studies; RAND Corp.) offers a thoroughly researched, persuasively written book of rare clarity and relevance that stands out in a crowded field of publications on the impact of an aging population and increasing medical costs. Her writing is especially strong in its depictions of recent changes in end-of-life trajectories, needs of those nearing the end of life, and roles of vital caregivers. The book ends with a comprehensive exploration of promising health care delivery and funding options. Anyone with current or anticipated financial, professional, or personal engagement in the welfare of the United States' aging population will find it immediately relevant. Perhaps more importantly, it should serve as a guide for anyone with potential for shaping health care policy--politicians, voters, and professionals. This reviewer was left with an overwhelming sense of the task ahead. Nevertheless, Lynn's thought-provoking strategies for assuring adequate care and support for caregivers makes this one of the most accessible approaches to long-term health care reform available. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. All levels. M. D. Lagerwey Western Michigan University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, April 2005
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Short Annotation
A manifesto arguing for changing the US health care system to provide better care for serious chronic illness and disability at the end of life.
Unpaid Annotation
A manifesto arguing for changing the US health care system to provide better care for serious chronic illness and disability at the end of life. In the authors words, the book is "an owner's manual for the health care system for all of us who hope to live long and die slow."
Bowker Data Service Summary
Joanne Lynn offers a discussion of the looming health care crisis in the America. With increasing numbers of people living longer, she argues, the current health care & community services are not up to the task. She lays out a plan for fundamental reform.
Main Description
Just a few generations ago, serious illness, like hazardous weather, arrived with little warning, and people either lived through it or died. In this important, convincing, and long-overdue call for health care reform, Joanne Lynn demonstrates that our current health system, like our concepts of health and disease, developed at a time when life was mostly short, serious illnesses and disabilities were common at every age, and dying was quick. Today, most Americans live a long life, with the disabilities and discomforts of progressive chronic illness appearing only during the final chapters of their life stories. Sick to Death and Not Going to Take It Anymore! maintains that health care and community services are not set up to meet the needs of the large number of people who face a prolonged period of progressive illness and disability before death. Lynn offers what she calls an "owner's manual for the health care system," which lays out facts, concepts, strategies, and action plans for genuine reform and gives the reader new ways to interpret information creatively, imagine innovative possibilities, and take steps to implement them.
Long Description
Just a few generations ago, serious illness, like hazardous weather, arrived with little warning, and people either lived through it or died. In this important, convincing, and long-overdue call for health care reform, Joanne Lynn demonstrates that our current health system, like our concepts of health and disease, developed at a time when life was mostly short, serious illnesses and disabilities were common at every age, and dying was quick. Today, most Americans live a long life, with the disabilities and discomforts of progressive chronic illness appearing only during the final chapters of their life stories.Sick to Death and Not Going to Take It Anymore!maintains that health care and community services are not set up to meet the needs of the large number of people who face a prolonged period of progressive illness and disability before death. Lynn offers what she calls an "owner's manual for the health care system," which lays out facts, concepts, strategies, and action plans for genuine reform and gives the reader new ways to interpret information creatively, imagine innovative possibilities, and take steps to implement them.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrations and Tablesp. vii
Forewordp. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Introductionp. 1
Just the Facts: Serious Chronic Disease in the Last Phase of Lifep. 4
Living with Chronic Conditions
Shortcomings in Current Care
The Baby Boom Grows Old
Who Will Provide Care?
"Dying" and the Problem of Prognostication
Which Illness Will It Be?
Costs and Who Pays
The Shape of Things to Come
Perspective: The Loneliness of the Long-term Care Giverp. 32
Seeing the World Differently: Ideas to Shape Reformp. 35
Life Span Perspective
Rethinking the Transition Model
Misleading Words and Ideas
The "No Surprise" Question
Trajectories of Illness across Time
Frequency of Trajectories
Anticipating Challenges
Creating and Naming a Category
More Patients, Fewer Caregivers
Working Out Patterns of Cost
Summary of Ideas to Shape Reform
Perspective: Quality Comes Homep. 63
Good Care for Some People, Sometimesp. 66
Hospice
Palliative Care at Home
Palliative Care in Hospitals
PACE: All-Inclusive Care
The Chronic-Care Model
Coordinating and Managing Care
Quality Improvement
Caregiver Programs
Practice Guidelines and Audit Tools
Gems and Strategies for Change
Perspective: In Britain, Progress in Care for the Last Part of Lifep. 88
Surveying the Terrain: Opportunities and Challengesp. 91
Key Features of Change
Caregivers as a Political Force
The Business Case for Change
Promoting Coordinated Care
Barriers to Reform
Avoiding Low-Impact Reforms
Perspective: The Case for Reforming U.S. Health Carep. 118
Good Care for Us All: Building the Care System to Count Onp. 121
Reprise of the Current Situation
Trajectories Form a Basis for Achievable Excellence
MediCaring: From Promises to Practical Program
Methods to Achieve Reform
Reforms to Implement Right Away!
Forging the Will to Make Improvements Happen
An Agenda for Actionp. 151
Referencesp. 167
Indexp. 191
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem