Catalogue


Russian opera and the symbolist movement [electronic resource] /
Simon Morrison.
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c2002.
description
xii, 362 p. : ill.
ISBN
0520229436 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
added author
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c2002.
isbn
0520229436 (alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
Chaikovsky and decadence -- Rimsky-Korsakov and religious syncretism -- Scriabin and theurgy -- Prokofiev and mimesis.
catalogue key
8846328
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2003-04-01:
Morrison (Princeton Univ.) offers a historical and analytical study of four operas that are in various ways linked to the symbolist movement in Russia at the turn of the 20th century: Tchaikovsky's Queen of Spades (1890), Rimsky-Korsakov's Legend of the Invisible City of Kitezh (1905), Scriabin's Mysterium (1902-15), and Prokofiev's Fiery Angel (1919-27). He considers the best known, The Queen of Spades, to be an anticipation of Russian symbolism; Legend represents a reaction to the decadence of the aesthetic; Angel parodies symbolist ideals. Mysterium--and its planned antecedent, Preparatory Act--reveals an obsession with symbolist ideas in a work that was never--perhaps could not be--finished. An appendix contains the complete libretto of Preparatory Act in transliterated Russian and English translation. Each essay provides not only a revealing analysis of the work at hand but also a meticulously documented context for the operas' relationship to Russian symbolism. Musical examples are well chosen and intelligently discussed. This is a difficult book, both for its largely unfamiliar material and its interdisciplinary approach, but it offers an exemplary study of the intersections of Russian opera and the symbolist aesthetic. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. Graduate and research collections only. K. Pendle University of Cincinnati
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, April 2003
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
An aesthetic, historical, and theoretical study of four scores, "Russian Opera and the Symbolist Movement "is a groundbreaking and imaginative treatment of the important yet neglected topic of Russian opera in the Silver Age. Spanning the gap between the supernatural Russian music of the nineteenth century and the compositions of Prokofiev and Stravinsky, this exceptionally insightful and well-researched book explores how Russian symbolist poets interpreted opera and prompted operatic innovation. Simon Morrison shows how these works, though stylistically and technically different, reveal the extent to which the operatic representation of the miraculous can be translated into its enactment. Morrison treats these largely unstudied pieces by canonical composers: Tchaikovskys "Queen of Spades, "Rimsky-Korsakovs "Legend of the Invisible City of Kitezh and the Maiden Fevroniya, "Scriabins unfinished "Mysterium, "and Prokofievs "Fiery Angel. "The chapters, revisionist studies of these composers and scores, address separate aspects of Symbolist poetics, discussing such topics as literary and musical decadence, pagan-Christian syncretism, theurgy, and life creation, or the portrayal of art in life. The appendix offers the first complete English-language translation of Scriabins libretto for the "Preparatory Act." Providing valuable insight into both the Symbolist enterprise and Russian musicology, this book casts new light on operas evolving, ambiguous place in fin de siecle culture.
Main Description
An aesthetic, historical, and theoretical study of four scores, Russian Opera and the Symbolist Movement is a groundbreaking and imaginative treatment of the important yet neglected topic of Russian opera in the Silver Age. Spanning the gap between the supernatural Russian music of the nineteenth century and the compositions of Prokofiev and Stravinsky, this exceptionally insightful and well-researched book explores how Russian symbolist poets interpreted opera and prompted operatic innovation. Simon Morrison shows how these works, though stylistically and technically different, reveal the extent to which the operatic representation of the miraculous can be translated into its enactment. Morrison treats these largely unstudied pieces by canonical composers: Tchaikovsky's Queen of Spades, Rimsky-Korsakov's Legend of the Invisible City of Kitezh and the Maiden Fevroniya, Scriabin's unfinished Mysterium, and Prokofiev's Fiery Angel. The chapters, revisionist studies of these composers and scores, address separate aspects of Symbolist poetics, discussing such topics as literary and musical decadence, pagan-Christian syncretism, theurgy, and life creation, or the portrayal of art in life. The appendix offers the first complete English-language translation of Scriabin's libretto for the Preparatory Act. Providing valuable insight into both the Symbolist enterprise and Russian musicology, this book casts new light on opera's evolving, ambiguous place in fin de si├Ęcle culture.
Long Description
An aesthetic, historical, and theoretical study of four scores,Russian Opera and the Symbolist Movementis a groundbreaking and imaginative treatment of the important yet neglected topic of Russian opera in the Silver Age. Spanning the gap between the supernatural Russian music of the nineteenth century and the compositions of Prokofiev and Stravinsky, this exceptionally insightful and well-researched book explores how Russian symbolist poets interpreted opera and prompted operatic innovation. Simon Morrison shows how these works, though stylistically and technically different, reveal the extent to which the operatic representation of the miraculous can be translated into its enactment. Morrison treats these largely unstudied pieces by canonical composers: Tchaikovsky'sQueen of Spades,Rimsky-Korsakov'sLegend of the Invisible City of Kitezh and the Maiden Fevroniya,Scriabin's unfinishedMysterium,and Prokofiev'sFiery Angel.The chapters, revisionist studies of these composers and scores, address separate aspects of Symbolist poetics, discussing such topics as literary and musical decadence, pagan-Christian syncretism, theurgy, and life creation, or the portrayal of art in life. The appendix offers the first complete English-language translation of Scriabin's libretto for thePreparatory Act. Providing valuable insight into both the Symbolist enterprise and Russian musicology, this book casts new light on opera's evolving, ambiguous place in fin de siegrave;cle culture.
Long Description
An aesthetic, historical, and theoretical study of four scores, Russian Opera and the Symbolist Movement is a groundbreaking and imaginative treatment of the important yet neglected topic of Russian opera in the Silver Age. Spanning the gap between the supernatural Russian music of the nineteenth century and the compositions of Prokofiev and Stravinsky, this exceptionally insightful and well-researched book explores how Russian symbolist poets interpreted opera and prompted operatic innovation. Simon Morrison shows how these works, though stylistically and technically different, reveal the extent to which the operatic representation of the miraculous can be translated into its enactment. Morrison treats these largely unstudied pieces by canonical composers: Tchaikovsky's Queen of Spades, Rimsky-Korsakov's Legend of the Invisible City of Kitezh and the Maiden Fevroniya, Scriabin's unfinished Mysterium, and Prokofiev's Fiery Angel. The chapters, revisionist studies of these composers and scores, address separate aspects of Symbolist poetics, discussing such topics as literary and musical decadence, pagan-Christian syncretism, theurgy, and life creation, or the portrayal of art in life. The appendix offers the first complete English-language translation of Scriabin's libretto for the Preparatory Act. Providing valuable insight into both the Symbolist enterprise and Russian musicology, this book casts new light on opera's evolving, ambiguous place in fin de siegrave;cle culture.
Unpaid Annotation
An aesthetic, historical, and theoretical study of four scores, "Russian Opera and the Symbolist Movement "is a groundbreaking and imaginative treatment of the important yet neglected topic of Russian opera in the Silver Age. Spanning the gap between the supernatural Russian music of the nineteenth century and the compositions of Prokofiev and Stravinsky, this exceptionally insightful and well-researched book explores how Russian symbolist poets interpreted opera and prompted operatic innovation. Simon Morrison shows how these works, though stylistically and technically different, reveal the extent to which the operatic representation of the miraculous can be translated into its enactment.Morrison treats these largely unstudied pieces by canonical composers: Tchaikovsky's "Queen of Spades, "Rimsky-Korsakov's "Legend of the Invisible City of Kitezh and the Maiden Fevroniya, "Scriabin's unfinished "Mysterium, "and Prokofiev's "Fiery Angel. "The chapters, revisionist studies of these composers and scores, address separate aspects of Symbolist poetics, discussing such topics as literary and musical decadence, pagan-Christian syncretism, theurgy, and life creation, or the portrayal of art in life. The appendix offers the first complete English-language translation of Scriabin's libretto for the "Preparatory Act."Providing valuable insight into both the Symbolist enterprise and Russian musicology, this book casts new light on opera's evolving, ambiguous place in fin de siecle culture.
Main Description
A pioneering study of the Symbolist Movement in early twentieth-century Russian opera.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgments
Note on Dating and Transliteration
Introduction
Chaikovsky and Decadence
Rimsky-Korsakov and Religious Syncretism
Scriabin and Theurgy
Prokofiev and Mimesis
Conclusion
Appendix: The Libretto of the Preparatory Act
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem